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Obscure Photoshop(etc) tool you have used.


GlennH 9 1.9k 1 France
20 May 2013 10:41PM
The HSB/HSL plugin is interesting, or little-known at least - used to be tucked away on the PS disc but more recently is only available by free download I think, here.

The HSB/HSL filter is applied to a duplicate layer in Photoshop, then you hit Ctrl + the green channel, create a hue/saturation adjustment layer, delete duplicate layer, then edit hue/saturation layer with a perfectly gradated mask revealing the most saturated areas of the image (or the least if you invert the original selection).

In recent years I guess the vibrance slider serves a similar role, although with the saturation mask you can play around with lightness and selection+feathering sliders to modify the result.

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JackAllTog e2
5 4.0k 58 United Kingdom
20 May 2013 10:46PM
Wow, lots to find here, thanks.
Yes Paul I've done a shoot with a single tall thin softbox with a open grid and loved it, and as you say it was crisper than i usually get, I've also used honeycomb grids on my cheap lights and that too gave great crispness - never tied it together before thanks.

Thanks Arhb, never tried the pen tool before, its got a few modes to master too, but seems to handle curves very well, and clicking the make selection button afterwards looks super to localised edits, i think you told me a bit about this before - i need to try this some more.

Those Channel and Path tabs, I did the "click+alt+control+shift" thing but i think first need to read up about this.

I knew Alt+Ctrl+Shift+E - i call it create a stamp layer - a snapshot of all before and sometimes use it for final liquidify tweaks of colour adjustments.
I tried Shift+Ctrl+Alt+N+E - but for me (cs6) it seemed to do the same thing.

Thanks for some great hints Smile
Paul Morgan e2
13 16.1k 6 England
21 May 2013 8:13AM

Quote:Yes Paul I've done a shoot with a single tall thin softbox with a open grid and loved it, and as you say it was crisper than i usually get, I've also used honeycomb grids on my cheap lights and that too gave great crispness - never tied it together before thanks


I`ll always be an advocate for getting it right in camera, and I admit my PS skills are pretty much limited to just the odd bit of dodging and burning, B&W conversions and so on Smile
JackAllTog e2
5 4.0k 58 United Kingdom
21 May 2013 9:43AM
Thanks Glenn, i did download those extra plugins, though not installed yet. I wonder if that's the kind of thing that
will gradually be lost with the cloud subscription?

Agreed Paul, A good photo to start with is a massive boost, and I think good glass is an overlooked essential here so that you don't lose the initial crispness. Whenever I think this I wonder if choosing the 24-105 over the 24-70 a few years back when the prices were similar was a studio mistake. At the time i wanted a good general lens and in that respect its been a good choice, but maybe less so now.

I've a few new good things to learn some more thanks - Local edits done with the pen tool, and a closer look at the channels tab - thanks will keep me busy on the PC till I get time to do another proper shoot.

Thank you.
ade_mcfade e2
10 15.1k 216 England
21 May 2013 10:01AM
ah ok - gotcha - I've meddled with channels and stuff, rememered you could "intersect" them and all sorts.

I wrote an action which created loads of them - kinda stopped using it when I realised it made each shot about 1 gig in size lol

use them to create masks rather than lots or new channels now Wink
pmorgan e2
8 217 13 England
21 May 2013 10:22AM
Yeah, if you intersect a darks with a lights channel luminosity mask you get a mid-tones mask. This in my opinion is probably the most useful of all. If you make curve adjustments using a mid-tone mask you affect just that, the mid tones leaving the brightest and darkest areas untouched. This is a great way to add contrast without losing shadow or highlight detail.
Paul Morgan e2
13 16.1k 6 England
23 May 2013 8:30AM
Very worthwhile with what you do Stuart.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9hN6TzXdbNs

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