Take your photography to the next level and beyond...

  • NEWS
  • REVIEWS
  • INSPIRATION
  • COMMUNITY
  • COMPETITIONS

Why not join for free today?

Join for Free

Your total photography experience starts here


Olympus OM-D EM-5 Discussion


Carabosse e2
11 39.5k 269 England
20 Feb 2012 1:32PM
For most enthusiasts, the lighter the camera + lenses, the more likely they are to take the kit out with them.

There is, of course, a balance between light enough and too light, for hand-held work anyway.

Join ePHOTOzine for free and remove these adverts.

User_Removed 4 4.6k 1 Scotland
20 Feb 2012 1:43PM

Quote:'Has anyone really picked up a DSLR and thought - "Christ thats heavy!"'

Yes!



Me too.

I just sold my D3s and posting it this morning, the package weighed 3 Kg (including a battery charger and spare battery but no lens - and even a 24-70mm lens weighs more than the battery and charger).

One of the reasons for opting to "downgrade" to a D800 was the weight issue.

Admittedly Nikons have always been more substantially built than Canons and I guess that does carry a weight penalty.
Overread 6 3.8k 18 England
20 Feb 2012 2:07PM

Quote:For most enthusiasts, the lighter the camera + lenses, the more likely they are to take the kit out with them.



I can certainly second that - especially if one does not have a car just to dump stuff in when travelling around. It makes a heck of a difference between a hybrid camera and a light zoom lens against something like a 7D and 120-300mm f2.8 lens - the weight alone is a massive difference and then you've the size difference as well.
kaybee 10 3.9k 24 Scotland
20 Feb 2012 2:54PM
I would add the word 'proffesional' to Keiths question.

There is a real difference in what a pro and an amature is looking for in the equipment and weight
does not come into it.

The new OM system is not really being geared to the pro

Quote:I would add the word 'proffesional' to Keiths question.

There is a real difference in what a pro and an amature is looking for in the equipment and weight
does not come into it.



Are you speaking from the point of view as a working pro.
Ive been a pro now for some years and Weight does play an important part in my choice of camera. Have you tried working all day everyday with a camera in your hand? I swapped from Nikon to Canon because at the time canon did a similar spec camera in a much lighter body. In fact I'm looking forward to a print test from the OM-D as i might add it to my camera bag. And i will be using it for Professional image making.

Why do amateurs get so hung up on equipment. I could pick up any DSLR on the market today an get pro results that would satisfy any client. You can not buy a bad camera today. As regards the new OM-D. your missing the point. this is a beautiful camera. specifications are not everything. The best camera you can have is the one you like using the most. not the one with all the bells and knobs on it.
It is the limitations in our equipment that make us creative photographers. If you want to improve and become a better photographer Have less equipment. The bigger your camera bag the smaller your talent.
User_Removed 4 4.6k 1 Scotland
20 Feb 2012 3:44PM

Quote: The best camera you can have is the one you like using the most. not the one with all the bells and knobs on it..


Can't argue with that.

But, of course, for many of us enthusiastic amateurs, the camera we enjoy using most might be the one with the most bells and knobs on it.

Some Forumites are going to get fed up with me saying this so often on here - but the reason why many amateurs have bigger, better, more expensive cameras than many professionals is that we do not have to justify our purchases in cost-benefit accounting terms. We can indulge our hobby, even to the extent of spending "silly money" on it. Of course it doesn't guarantee that we will take better photographs but it does mean that, if we take a poor photograph, we can't blame our equipment.

That is not dissimilar to the reason why some amateurs take far better photographs than many professionals - nothing to do with equipment and possibly little to do with relative skill levels. It is simply that, for the professional, time is money. As an amateur, I can afford to spend several days and hundreds of s in travel costs just to get one photograph that I have visualised. If the light isn't right, I can go back next week and the week after that. Because I am doing it purely as a hobby for my own satisfaction, with no intention of selling the final result, cost does not come into it. Very few professionals would earn enough from a single image to justify such costs, certainly not on a speculative basis.

.
strawman 10 22.0k 16 United Kingdom
20 Feb 2012 4:00PM
I understand goexplore, often with hobbies people enjoy using the equipment as much as anything else and often people love to have the latest and greatest. You see it with cars etc. And then you get one downmanship where people thrive in getting a lot from low cost stuff, then it gets older and becomes classic and you get another bunch of users.

the point of why go lightweight, I always thought photojournalists went for lighter cameras so Leica rangefinder cameras became the icons they are through this. While landscape photographers are hardier more horse hair shirt guys so go for field cameras......

Different uses, different camera choices. Wish I could afford them all.
Good points LeftForum & Strawman,
If you want perfection from your photography you won't get as much time to do if your a working pro. I really like LeftForums approach. Slow and with perfection. the ultimate way to be a photographer.
I love sitting on the side of a mountain for hours waiting for a cloud. pure joy. But then i really love the buzz of the street too.
Your point is also true Strawman. cameras have become icons of their genre because they were the best for the job. not always the most advance but the most reliable and easiest to use.
Carabosse e2
11 39.5k 269 England
20 Feb 2012 7:14PM
I have to say I am unhealthily interested in the OM-D. Sad All my lenses (Olympus and Canon) will fit it.

Uh-oh, I forsee another setback to my financial planning - and my IFA will be annoyed............ again. Lol! Wink
Paul Morgan e2
13 15.7k 6 England
20 Feb 2012 8:13PM
Lol well I`ve recently added a Canon FD 50mm 1.4 to my collection of Zuiko/Nikor lenses and mount lenses, I`m now just waiting for the 20 quid adapter to arrive Smile
User_Removed 4 4.6k 1 Scotland
20 Feb 2012 9:30PM
....but, interesting although this is, let's not forget that I caused this wee diversion by pointing out that Damien McGillicuddy was suggesting he might ditch his dSLR cameras and adopt the OM-D.

And Damien is one professional for whom I have huge respect and the highest regard. Believe me, he will take amazing photographs with virtually any camera he picks up. Especially with the assistance of Charlie and a bundle of latex!
Carabosse e2
11 39.5k 269 England
21 Feb 2012 12:42AM

Quote:Believe me, he will take amazing photographs with virtually any camera he picks up


Indeed, to take amazing photos it is preferable to be an amazing photographer. Merely owning an amazing camera won't do it Wink
Carabosse e2
11 39.5k 269 England
9 Mar 2012 2:22AM
Well given the wallet-busting price of the Canon 5D Mk III, I don't think I'll be galloping back into the Canon fold! Sad I recognise the 5D III and the Nikon D800 are going to be the best DSLRs out there.

But do I actually need a camera of that calibre for enthusiast photography and (exceedingly) occasional paid work? Moreover do I need the weight, and price, of the top-quality lenses which would have to be purchased for these cams? I think the answers have to be: no and no.

So I am looking with renewed interest at the OM-D as a sort of sensible(ish) purchase..... although not particularly cheap, in fact. But, for sure, greatly cheaper, and lighter, than the above-mentioned DSLRs (+ lenses).

A weather-sealed, mirrorless camera with a viewfinder, in-body "5-axis" IS, 9fps and very fast AF. Up to 25,600 ISO... although it remains to be seen how high is usable; I have seen a reasonable ISO 8000 shot (significantly better than my current Pen can manage at ISO 6400).

So............. tell me why I mustn't buy one. Smile
kaybee 10 3.9k 24 Scotland
9 Mar 2012 10:41AM
Does it feel more robust and less plasticy than the PENs?
Carabosse e2
11 39.5k 269 England
9 Mar 2012 11:24AM

Quote:Does it feel more robust and less plasticy than the PENs?


Not sure which Pen you're referring to but, to quote from a review on the E-PL2 (my model): "The E-PL2 is solid and well-built, and most of its control points have a positive, high-quality feel."

So that's not an issue for me, even at present. The only bit of it which feels a bit delicate is the battery/card cover. But I'm ever so careful! Wink

I've no idea when the OM-D is even more solid. I assume so, since they have bothered to weather seal it etc.. I think the OM-D may be Oly's answer to demands for a "Pro Pen", although it is not being marketed as such.

Sign In

You must be a member to leave a comment.

ePHOTOzine, the web's friendliest photography community.

Join For Free

Upload photos, chat with photographers, win prizes and much more.