Take your photography to the next level and beyond...

  • NEWS
  • REVIEWS
  • INSPIRATION
  • COMMUNITY
  • COMPETITIONS

Why not join for free today?

Join for Free

Your total photography experience starts here


Openning a studio ...


13 Jun 2013 2:50PM
I am looking at two options here - not sure which on is the best ... if I were to rent a space say 2500 sqr feet and break it into a couple smaler rooms and rent out some of the space - would photographers use the space and rent per hour or per day/month?

Or do I just get my own space like around 1,000 sqr feet and kepp it to myself - or share the space with other photographers to help cover the costs of the space?

Other then a computer or two, backdrops, lights, and a camera of course - what are other items would be needed when openning a new studio?

Join ePHOTOzine for free and remove these adverts.

13 Jun 2013 4:32PM
a little tip if you get to open your studio would be to make sure there are no spelling mistakes as in your text above ,
it lacks professionalism..

Good luck in your venture

David
scottishphototours 10 2.5k 2 Scotland
13 Jun 2013 4:38PM
You must be mad...

Rent, rates, water rates, gas and electric, heating, insurance, security, LOTS of framed stuff on the walls, brochures, business cards, sofas, stools, props, lighting attachments, radio transmitters, a printer, mount folders, clear bags, carrier bags etc etc, not to mention having to pay staff if you are busy too. We made 50 hiring out the studio in 3 years to other photographers, so I wouldn't bank on that either.

Once you've done all that, a local Max Spielman will open up and they'll be charging 10 for 3 of 8x6's, taken on a bridge camera by a wee lassie who sticks the camera 2 feet from the kid on wide angle, takes the first 3 pics then sticks the card into her 3500 printing machine to generate the worst 3 8x6's you've ever seen. And hey, you know it's crap, but the local ned lassies all think it's wonderful and suddenly your 129 framed print offer doesn't look quite such good value - and then they Facebook all their pals and they all go to Max Spielman too...

If you're talking UK, I'd tell you to forget it as the High Street is DEAD. Dunno about Canada though.
13 Jun 2013 4:46PM
That is something to think about ...

So a start up for a new studio would be??
scottishphototours 10 2.5k 2 Scotland
13 Jun 2013 4:50PM

Quote:That is something to think about ...

So a start up for a new studio would be??



Expensive, Andrew.... expensive!
13 Jun 2013 4:52PM
What do you all think about starting off small and getting an office to use as a studio and offer headshots, single person/couples and babies - just to start out with - rent a space about 10x12 for about 350 Canadian??
scottishphototours 10 2.5k 2 Scotland
13 Jun 2013 5:02PM
You're starting off from the wrong angle my friend.

Work out you're costs, break it down to get your prices and then you'll see what customer uptake you need. Then you'll probably not bother, as you'll see there's no money in it unless you can get daily sales in the hundreds of dollars. Also, most people that want people shots tend to want them done at the weekends when they're free, not during the week, so you can count on having to work every weekend to make it pay.

Sure, start off small but 20x16 feet is the smallest studio I would take, under that and you're limiting what you can do to generate revenue. Our place was 30x20 and was ideal for family groups up to about 16 people. A 10x12 space would get you doing the groups you suggested but may stifle your business if things take off.
Britman 8 1.7k England
15 Jun 2013 10:30AM
If you are just going to start out offering head shots, you don't need a studio. Get a Westcott X-Drop and go to people's homes. Setting up a studio is expensive unless you already have a good customer base that'll follow you there.

Good luck, it hard out there for photographer, very hard to convince Joe public that your pictures are worth the price you charge.
Paul_Anthony 2 369 4 Wales
16 Jun 2013 8:54AM
It's not all doom and gloom Scottishphototours. Not that I am suggesting you do not, but if you are willing to put the effort in then there are rewards to be had from opening a High Street Studio. We have been running a high street studio for the past three years, it has been a success, in fact we are moving studios to a new area which in not only busier but also more expensive to run.

You are correct though, the OP needs to consider so much more than studio layout. But in answer to your question Andrew, a reception, a large studio area (minimum 500cm x 500cm), a viewing area (a projector works well), back office, changing area, toilet & kitchen area.

Products are also important, Frames, Canvases, Acrylics, Prints, Digital Products, Albums.

Your brand is also important, it needs to be memorable, clean, simple, classy. I's stay away from using your own name and think of a Brand Name.

And perhaps most important is the financial side of your business. Only you can decide how much to charge (or need to charge based on customer numbers), only you can source the products that fit in with your pricing and don't forget the tax man.

Paul
scottishphototours 10 2.5k 2 Scotland
16 Jun 2013 10:16PM

Quote:It's not all doom and gloom Scottishphototours. Not that I am suggesting you do not, but if you are willing to put the effort in then there are rewards to be had from opening a High Street Studio. We have been running a high street studio for the past three years, it has been a success, in fact we are moving studios to a new area which in not only busier but also more expensive to run.


Which emphasises the need for a great deal of market research before you even go there and start. We started up and 8 months later the country was in recession, not exactly something you can plan for!! Before that the first 6 months was very good and very rewarding, but no business can sustain 3 years of sales stagnation and so we shut up shop.

Hope things go well for you in the new place.

Andy
Lucian 4 561
17 Jun 2013 1:20AM
Getting a studio is something I have considered for some time now but have not been brave enough to do. I now have 2 homes 35 miles apart from each other and have decided to set up a studio in a room in each of my homes. I don't have a lot of room to work with but I have thought carefully about my setups so I can take photos. I am hoping that with the right marketing it will be a success and I will be able to run the business without the overheads that are involved with being on the high street. I am offering the shoots for free and prints from just 10 each to ensure my shoots are affordable. My intention is to do baby/child portraits and my marketing strategy is to give vouchers out to people with children. The voucher gives people a free 15 min photoshoot. I am distribution the vouchers

1. going round industial estates and offices where I can meet a few people at the same time and can give them vouchers.
2. Giving them to people at galadays because there are lots of kids there.
3. Handing them out in the street when I see someone with a baby or child.
4. Advertising offers on facebook as its free and effective advertising.

I think this sort of advertising will work as it allows me to target clientele with babys and children but I know it wont make enough money to justify having a high street studio. I will inform you of my progress.

Sign In

You must be a member to leave a comment.

ePHOTOzine, the web's friendliest photography community.

Join For Free

Upload photos, chat with photographers, win prizes and much more.