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Photo nicked AGAIN, should i try and get it removed ?

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LVanDhal
LVanDhal  1126 forum posts United Kingdom1 Constructive Critique Points
17 Apr 2013 - 9:51 PM

Awhile ago i created a photograph for a food competition of a rose made out of bread, it didn't win, but it did prove to be rather popular,
and with out my permission it was lifted wholesale from the site I had submitted it to.

I chased around the net mostly getting it removed,
the biggest problem was pinterest who have quite ( to my mind) a complicated procedure to
prove ownership of the image,
so I settled for disabling links on the site I submitted it to, and gradually it fade away from the pinners memory !

I did give permission to the only two websites that actually asked me if they could have the image for use, and for no payment either.

But because pinterest allows other to just re-pin, the photo has turned up on a couple of Company's web sites and that I object to,
so far I have been able to get the image taken off.

Tonight I've just found another company in Canada using the image, no credit given, and its on the company face book feed, with the tag line
"Give us bread,roses, and Gay lea butter"
"Gay Lea" being the company name ,

its also been "Pinned" on the company pinterest board, so its back on pinterest again.

I don't have a Face book account, so I cannot contact the company that way,
the actual Gay Lea butter website has no email address that I could find,
only a telephone number and its in Canada !!!

Should i just give up trying to keep this image??

Or is it worth trying to get it taken off the company site and stick to my principles that big business should not help themselves to images when they can afford to pay a photographer to take them.

What would you do if it was your work ?
(given that I am an amateur not a professional.)

All replies very much apreciated,
liz.

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17 Apr 2013 - 9:51 PM

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Jestertheclown
17 Apr 2013 - 10:26 PM

I seem to remember this from the first time around.
Personally, I never upload anything to anywhere on the internet that I'm not prepared to see turning up unexpectedly in the 'wrong' place.
Rightly or wrongly (and I'd imagine you'll receive chapter and verse on that subject, having opened this thread), any image that's uploaded to any site for any reason will be considered 'fair game' by a vast number of people and they'll help themselves to it.
I've only ever had one image suddenly appear on a (slightly bizarre) Arabian website and getting that removed would have been nigh on, if not absolutely, impossible.
It turned out that the image was actually 'hot linked' to a version on my own website and thanks to the advice of a member on here, I was able to get the link removed.
My point being that had I not been able to, the image would still be being used and I'd just have to get used to the idea.

Bren.

mike0101
mike0101  10 United Kingdom1 Constructive Critique Points
17 Apr 2013 - 10:40 PM

The Gay Lea website has a red 'contact' icon near the top rh corner; it looks like a phone + envelope. It leads to a contact form.
Have a try...

LVanDhal
LVanDhal  1126 forum posts United Kingdom1 Constructive Critique Points
17 Apr 2013 - 10:40 PM


Quote: I seem to remember this from the first time around.
Personally, I never upload anything to anywhere on the internet that I'm not prepared to see turning up unexpectedly in the 'wrong' place.
Rightly or wrongly (and I'd imagine you'll receive chapter and verse on that subject, having opened this thread), any image that's uploaded to any site for any reason will be considered 'fair game' by a vast number of people and they'll help themselves to it.
I've only ever had one image suddenly appear on a (slightly bizarre) Arabian website and getting that removed would have been nigh on, if not absolutely, impossible.
It turned out that the image was actually 'hot linked' to a version on my own website and thanks to the advice of a member on here, I was able to get the link removed.
My point being that had I not been able to, the image would still be being used and I'd just have to get used to the idea.

Bren.

Oh bren I am cringing with embarrassment here, Blush
I should have read the forum first, their is a very similar thread further down with someone having the same trouble and quandary over a wall paper site.
Your advice is sound though, image = fair game, and i guess its up to just how much of a hobby I want to turn hunting them down in to lol.
I think I'll have a cup of tea, send the company an email ( there will be an address somewhere) and then let it go.
that way I will feel like i've done something but not got over wound up about it.
Thanks for the reply,
liz.

LVanDhal
LVanDhal  1126 forum posts United Kingdom1 Constructive Critique Points
17 Apr 2013 - 10:42 PM


Quote: The Gay Lea website has a red 'contact' icon near the top rh corner; it looks like a phone + envelope. It leads to a contact form.
Have a try...

Thanks Mike, I just replied to Bren and I knew they would have one some where, I let myself get flustered by it lol.

Coventryphotog
Coventryphotog Junior Member 1149 forum posts United Kingdom
17 Apr 2013 - 11:02 PM

I wonder if Apple would accept an argument whereby someone said - you put Ipads in shop windows, therefore I am free to take one gratis....honestly - what is all this Copyright legislation for?

LVanDhal
LVanDhal  1126 forum posts United Kingdom1 Constructive Critique Points
17 Apr 2013 - 11:34 PM

Hi coventryphotog, its a good point, what is this copyright legislation for, to me it seems only the big fish in the pond can afford to use it.
I recall the case of a young girl who had an etsy account to sell craft items she made at home, she used some bottle caps from a well known brand of cola, and received a cease and desist noticed from the corporate giant itself.

At my local market some years a go trading standards did a sweep,
arrested quite a few stall holders for selling fake items.
But if you found me running a market stall selling giant canvases with your photos printed on them, I don't think trading standards would be that interested?
let alone arrest me and prosecute ( not that i would ever do such a thing Smile )

It seems to me that we here in the uk are told we have all these Rights, and laws in many areas, but oh boy when you try to use them it always comes down to "But can you afford a solicitor at a minimum of £120 an hour?"

MikeRC
MikeRC e2 Member 93489 forum postsMikeRC vcard United Kingdom
18 Apr 2013 - 7:26 AM


Quote: What would you do if it was your work ?
(given that I am an amateur not a professional.)

I would move on ....get over it....don't let it take over your life.
I'm sure it's very good but it's only a picture....EPZ members weren't even keen on it.

.....just my opinion... sorry

keithh
keithh e2 Member 1022898 forum postskeithh vcard Wallis and Futuna31 Constructive Critique Points
18 Apr 2013 - 7:29 AM


Quote: EPZ members weren't even keen on it

Not the yardstick for commercial viability i would use Wink

answersonapostcard
answersonapostcard Site Moderator 1012601 forum postsanswersonapostcard vcard United Kingdom15 Constructive Critique Points
18 Apr 2013 - 7:44 AM

If anyone is gaining commercially from a pilfered image they should be made to pay Wink

Nothing should be 'fair game' we live in an digital world, its all about education and taking ownership, you'd be surprised but a lot of people really dont understand copyright/intellectual property.

Shame they dont have a twitter account, things get noticed quickly on there Wink

keithh
keithh e2 Member 1022898 forum postskeithh vcard Wallis and Futuna31 Constructive Critique Points
18 Apr 2013 - 9:03 AM

We can't stop music and movies being downloaded illegally - what chance do you think anybody has of stopping the 'borrowing' of digital images?

samueldilworth
18 Apr 2013 - 9:30 AM

I know next to nothing about copyright law, but I would think commercial entities like Gay Lea Foods – which seems to be a large 55-year-old cooperative with an expensive website – should know better than to nick photos for their advertising, on social media or elsewhere. At the very least I’d harass them over that.

Whether individuals with no commercial interest should be hounded for blogging a photo is a slightly different question, the answer to which I don’t know. Nor do I know where fair use starts, or should start, and where copyright starts interfering with free speech, artistic expression, and ultimately culture. Presumably it does interfere eventually – though I’m sure there are people who would defend copyright even then.

adrian_w
adrian_w e2 Member 73294 forum postsadrian_w vcard Scotland4 Constructive Critique Points
18 Apr 2013 - 10:13 AM


Quote: But if you found me running a market stall selling giant canvases with your photos printed on them, I don't think trading standards would be that interested?

They would be if they knew the photos were improperly acquired.


Quote: but I would think commercial entities like Gay Lea Foods – which seems to be a large 55-year-old cooperative with an expensive website – should know better than to nick photos for their advertising

They probably acquired it in good faith from an image supplier who would be the one who originally nicked it.

samueldilworth
18 Apr 2013 - 10:18 AM

adrian_w:

Quote: They probably acquired it in good faith from an image supplier who would be the one who originally nicked it.

Is that how it normally works? All the more reason to protest to Gay Lea Foods: the company might come down hard on its image supplier, which in turn might be forced to change its practices.

Ade_Osman
Ade_Osman e2 Member 114493 forum postsAde_Osman vcard England36 Constructive Critique Points
18 Apr 2013 - 10:59 AM

The moral of the story is, if you don't want your work copied, stolen, pilfered or used elsewhere on the net, don't post the damn things online in the first place, especially to the likes of sites such as Facebook, Pinterest and a host of other picture sites. If you must post images on the web, use some sort of watermark, though even that won't protect you from someone desperate to use an image.

I limit my postings to EPZ and as yet haven't had any problems, probably because my images ain't good enough Sad But my point is if you must post images here there and everywhere, you have to expect to have a few of the turn up somewhere they don't belong. Doesn't make it right I know, but sadly it's a fact of life. It's why so many pros don't use the likes of Facebook or even post and keep their images on display on EPZ. You could spend half your life chasing around the web looking for images that may have been stolen or inadvertently borrowed Smile and then spend as much time again trying to get them removed from site that have used them.

Best to just move on and learn from it and give yourself a smile that someone thought your image would work on their site Wink

Last Modified By Ade_Osman at 18 Apr 2013 - 11:05 AM

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