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Photographing the planets and stars ?


pulsar69 10 1.6k 6 United Kingdom
30 Sep 2011 7:24PM
I have a great viewing position from our garden at home and would love to take some astronomical photos , I can get ok shots of the moon with my 70-200 but looking for a lot more, dont want to spend the earth as its just hobbyist stuff and have seen things like this http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/15-30x-50-1200mm-2500mm-DSLR-Telescope-Canon-Rebel-Kiss-X4-5D-XT-20D-10D-/320763380875?pt=AU_Cameras_Telescopes_Binoculars&hash=item4aaefcc48b any advice from anyone would be appreciated , kit is canon 5dmk2 ..

Andrew

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MrGoatsmilk 6 1.5k England
30 Sep 2011 8:10PM
Have a look on stargazers lounge there are a few threads re astrophotography that will really help. I think you would be wasting your money on the item you link to. I use a made lx90 gps 8" with various attachments and still find it hard.
MrGoatsmilk 6 1.5k England
30 Sep 2011 8:12PM
Meade not made (damn predictive text) Tongue
ianrobinson e2
5 1.2k 8 United Kingdom
30 Sep 2011 10:15PM
Get a telescope and an adaptor for your camera and hey presto you have your close up images.
(caps lock turned off - mod)
oldblokeh 3 920 United Kingdom
1 Oct 2011 11:12AM
There are lots of reasons why this kit will not produce good results. If you really want to have a go at low-cost astrophotography, maybe have a try at constructing a barn door: Wikipedia article on barn door tracker. It's a device that allows you to track the apparent movement of the stars across the sky so as to take exposures without star trailing.
1 Oct 2011 9:05PM
Oldblokeh is correct, buy a 6'' telescope plus adaptor for your camera and make sure the telescope comes with a motor, i paid 250 for mine. you need the motor to move the telescope in time with the earths rotation.
User_Removed 10 3.3k 4 United Kingdom
1 Oct 2011 9:27PM
The earth is rotating?
snapbandit 10 2.2k 3 Northern Ireland
1 Oct 2011 9:32PM

Quote:The earth is rotating?


Don't be ridiculous!!!!, the Earth is flat & the universe rotates around it, the motor will track with the movement of the skies.....obviously!! TongueWink

(P.S. Saturns rings are made up from lost lens caps!! )...probably....
User_Removed 10 3.3k 4 United Kingdom
1 Oct 2011 9:37PM
Yes the motor will track the movement of the skies!
snapbandit 10 2.2k 3 Northern Ireland
1 Oct 2011 9:45PM
(Back on topic) I'm interested in this as well but have absolutely no knowledge of the subject, another question...roughly what would the magnification (in focal length/mm terms for a simpleton like me Sad ) of the aforementioned 6" telescope? & what size in the frame would the other planets, such as Saturn or Jupiter when visible, be?

Joe B
oldblokeh 3 920 United Kingdom
1 Oct 2011 10:04PM
Well now, let's see... 2000mm will make the moon nearly full frame in 35mm format, and the angular diameter of the moon is about 30 arcminutes. The angular diameter of Jupiter at opposition (closest approach) is about 30 arcseconds, so to get it nearly full frame would need 60 times the focal length. Of course, the image will be pretty dim by then.

Another issue is that you need very still air, what astronomers call 'good seeing', to capture decent planetary images. If the stars are at all twinkly forget it.
User_Removed 10 3.3k 4 United Kingdom
1 Oct 2011 11:34PM

Quote:to get it nearly full frame would need 60 times the focal length. Of course, the image will be pretty dim by then.


He didn't ask about getting it full frame. He asked how big such planets might appear using the aforementioned 6" telescope
oldblokeh 3 920 United Kingdom
2 Oct 2011 8:24AM
Correct, but I can't give an answer since I don't know the focal length of the 6" telescope objective. He may know and be able to do the arithmetic.
pulsar69 10 1.6k 6 United Kingdom
2 Oct 2011 10:15AM
Is a motor really able to allow a precise sharp shot over a long exposure with a telescope , seems like a pretty exact science ! is the earths rotation an exact constant or is that something that also needs to be worked out , sorry if Im sounding thick ! but never looked into this before .. ( well looked into the sky but not the workings of it )
bfgstew 8 668 105 England
2 Oct 2011 10:56AM
This Astrophotography should give you all the info you need to get going, or at least think about it!!!!

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