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Photography and coping with depression

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brian1208
brian1208 e2 Member 1110152 forum postsbrian1208 vcard United Kingdom12 Constructive Critique Points
2 Jan 2013 - 5:11 PM


Quote: Simarlarly I have always avoided counselling in the belief that some boxes should be closed and never be opened again, though as I get older, those once secure boxes are developing more and more holes

Its interesting you use this analogy as its exactly the one I found when going through counselling. After one very frightening session the therapist and I worked out a strategy fror sealing all the evil memories back in a secure place which, some 16 years later, still remains not lost but securely sealed.

If you haven't already done so maybe consider at least having a chat with your Doc or local counselling service to see what is available.

Cognitive Therapy is interesting because it is more about developing a coping strategy to deal with the situation than its is about exploring the reasons for the depression and is thus less likely to "open the box"

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2 Jan 2013 - 5:11 PM

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Paul Morgan
Paul Morgan e2 Member 1314820 forum postsPaul Morgan vcard England6 Constructive Critique Points
2 Jan 2013 - 5:20 PM


Quote: Cognitive Therapy is interesting because it is more about developing a coping strategy to deal with the situation than its is about exploring the reasons for the depression and is thus less likely to "open the box"

I`ve recently started with this therapy for PTSD, it deals with the present and the future, not the past.

http://www.nhs.uk/Conditions/Post-traumatic-stress-disorder/Pages/Treatment.aspx

Last Modified By Paul Morgan at 2 Jan 2013 - 5:26 PM
Griff2012
Griff2012 e2 Member 2323 forum postsGriff2012 vcard United Kingdom1 Constructive Critique Points
2 Jan 2013 - 5:26 PM


Quote:
I like the idea of a project, though the only thing that comes to mind at present is perhaps a series of images about depression (I'm not sure whether that would count!)

Hi Pete,

why not try the project that you suggest. It may be cathartic. From experience I have found that using your strengths to examine and express your fears is an effective tool.

Another suggestion for a topic is to portray a bit of that colour that Alexandra SD refers to. By actively looking for the colour in life you will start to notice it more.

Let the warm and sincere responses of everyone here keep your fire alight,

J

Eviscera
Eviscera  81096 forum posts United Kingdom149 Constructive Critique Points
2 Jan 2013 - 5:53 PM

Photography can be good therapy Peter.

Not just the "geting out there" in the wind and rain but an outlet for expressionism.

I like this description , there are others.

"Expressionism is an artistic style in which the artist attempts to depict not objective reality
but rather the subjective emotions and responses that objects and events arouse in him. He accomplishes his aim through distortion,exaggeration, primitivism, and fantasy and through
the vivid, jarring, violent, or dynamic application of formal elements."

And in that context , I think you should separate your camera club frustrations (good for a social mix , but rubbish at encouraging innovation) and embark on your own form of escapism.


Its not a panacea , but you could start closing your own boxes...

Anyway , far better than spending loads of dosh on expensive kit and doing bird on stick images !

Dr Dave

Smile

Fogey
Fogey  168 forum posts United Kingdom13 Constructive Critique Points
2 Jan 2013 - 5:57 PM


Quote: This thread has produced some great suggestions, but one thing that is apparent is that depression effects people in many different ways. It therefore follows that what is right for one may not be the answer to someone else. Someone mentioned "wallowing in pity" earlier. I can honestly say that for my own part, this has never been the issue. Guilt, self-loathing and anger yes, but pity, no. I have never considered medication and not sure I could. The suspicion that my creativity is born form my "damaged" self leads me to the conclusion that to dull those senses with medication would somehow ruin that small part of me that still functions. Simarlarly I have always avoided counselling in the belief that some boxes should be closed and never be opened again, though as I get older, those once secure boxes are developing more and more holes!

I like the idea of a project, though the only thing that comes to mind at present is perhaps a series of images about depression (I'm not sure whether that would count!)

The Americans call it closure. Once you have opened those boxes and aired what is in them, you'll find that your problems are halved.

p12owe
p12owe  1101 forum posts United Kingdom2 Constructive Critique Points
2 Jan 2013 - 6:16 PM

Quote: The Americans call it closure. Once you have opened those boxes and aired what is in them, you'll find that your problems are halved.

I am sure for many that might be the answer, however I also believe that much might also depend upon the contents of those boxes. Perhaps the remembering of some experiences, however well controlled and professionally led would have only negative and perhaps catastrophic consequences.

Paul Morgan
Paul Morgan e2 Member 1314820 forum postsPaul Morgan vcard England6 Constructive Critique Points
2 Jan 2013 - 6:30 PM


Quote: Perhaps the remembering of some experiences, however well controlled and professionally led would have only negative and perhaps catastrophic consequences

This is pretty much how I see it, for me its dealing with the triggers that open these boxes, some boxes are best kept under lock and key.

AlexandraSD
2 Jan 2013 - 6:37 PM


Quote: I like the idea of a project, though the only thing that comes to mind at present is perhaps a series of images about depression (I'm not sure whether that would count!)

Without sounding flippant, thats a depressing idea, but its a start Wink

A series of images portraying depression could turn out to be a low key, monochromatic study of a bucketfull of negativity. Rather than give your photography a focus, it could really do more harm than good, in so many ways. Colour really does influence how we feel, so how about something so simplistic as capturing one colour per week? Anything yellow this week. anything crimson the week after, etc.

From my standpoint photography helped me a lot, so so much, in fact it helped to change me. I simply photographed myself, wore my heart on my sleeve and bared everything, expressing myself through the medium of photography, and colour was vital for this, i just had a brief flick through my port here and primary colours featured a lot during 2012, and i uploaded any old crap really, some real naff images, but that didnt really matter to me, i enjoyed taking those photo's, those snapshots of my life at that moment in time, and just sharing those images here was therapeutic, and in the process i have connected with people here who i am proud to call friends, they know who they are.

You dont need platitudes, but its true, your never alone even if you think you are.

AlexandraSD
2 Jan 2013 - 6:52 PM


Quote: This is pretty much how I see it, for me its dealing with the triggers that open these boxes, some boxes are best kept under lock and key.

I do not agree, we are talking about feelings here, emotion, not something you can easily put away or hide from, conceal in a box and pretend it isn't really that important. Feelings are important, feelings are what makes us tick, without them we would be robots. Surely suppressing feelings is what makes us depressed in the first place to a degree? While being true in my case, it may be different for others, but feelings and emotions are often ignored and dismissed as trivial, when in reality they are not, far from it.

There is no shame in getting emotional, without emotions you may as well be a piece of wood, and everyone's feelings and needs are important, even yours! And there ain't no mental box on earth that can hide emotion so strong that it has a detrimental effect on our health.

p12owe
p12owe  1101 forum posts United Kingdom2 Constructive Critique Points
2 Jan 2013 - 7:12 PM

Quote we are talking about feelings here, emotion, not something you can easily put away or hide from, conceal in a box and pretend it isn't really that important

I think it is important to distinguish between feelings or emotions and the effect of real memories of real events. Strange as it may seem, I have very few easily recalled memories of a large part of my childhood. It is, I assume my own defence mechanism against something that could still cause further damage. I am, rightly or wrongly, rather inclined to trust that mechanism. As somebody else suggested, it may be more fruitful to explore the triggers instead.

Paul Morgan
Paul Morgan e2 Member 1314820 forum postsPaul Morgan vcard England6 Constructive Critique Points
2 Jan 2013 - 8:57 PM


Quote: I do not agree, we are talking about feelings here, emotion, not something you can easily put away or hide from, conceal in a box and pretend it isn't really that important

Feelings, emotions, there all part of the end result aren`t they, for me its more about controlling the triggers, learning how to spot them and stop them, its a lot easier said than done but I`m getting there.

collywobles
2 Jan 2013 - 9:05 PM

Peter have PM'd you

p12owe
p12owe  1101 forum posts United Kingdom2 Constructive Critique Points
6 Jan 2013 - 8:32 PM

Many thanks to all those who took the time to respond to this thread. I have taken the advice offered, and although not "out and about" with my camera just yet, I have spent some time on a triptych project at home. I have uploaded the first image today. Hopefully the spring will bring new enthusiasm and ideas!

StrayCat
StrayCat  1014407 forum posts Canada2 Constructive Critique Points
6 Jan 2013 - 10:57 PM

Glad to see you're on the mend, hopefully. One of the best ways to control depression naturally, is excercise; that's why winter is likely to bring it on; weather too miserable to go out for a walk, much shorter days, less sunlight, etc. However, a doctor's advice is still the number one way to approach it, if you think you're suffering from depression. I have to push myself in winter to go out and get fresh air, and walk, and it gets harder the longer I put it off.

Fogey
Fogey  168 forum posts United Kingdom13 Constructive Critique Points
15 Feb 2013 - 3:12 PM


Quote: This thread has produced some great suggestions, but one thing that is apparent is that depression effects people in many different ways. It therefore follows that what is right for one may not be the answer to someone else. Someone mentioned "wallowing in pity" earlier. I can honestly say that for my own part, this has never been the issue. Guilt, self-loathing and anger yes, but pity, no. I have never considered medication and not sure I could. The suspicion that my creativity is born form my "damaged" self leads me to the conclusion that to dull those senses with medication would somehow ruin that small part of me that still functions. Simarlarly I have always avoided counselling in the belief that some boxes should be closed and never be opened again, though as I get older, those once secure boxes are developing more and more holes!

I like the idea of a project, though the only thing that comes to mind at present is perhaps a series of images about depression (I'm not sure whether that would count!)

Think you are wrong. You were born with your creativity which has nothing to do with your problems. Get your problems sorted and your creativity will soar - promise!

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