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Photography and coping with depression


LVanDhal 2 126 1 United Kingdom
15 Feb 2013 4:57PM
I understand what you are saying Fogey, and why you might see it that way, in terms of "Problems" that can be solved, but....
its kind of like saying if you have a cold take asprin or paracetamol, and then you'll never have to worry about that cold again.
Some people think they get colds alot, they put up with them, and maybe after time discover that actually those endless colds are actually a symptom of something far worse.
Creativity and Depression/ mental health issues, are inter linked, is one a symptom of the other ? possibly?,
the incidence of creative behavior and poor mental health is very widely documented through out history.

Many of the current medications do not restore a person to full mental well being,
they only control the extreme affect's of the symptoms, which is how the Anti psychotic medications gained the nick name "The chemical cosh"
Because these medications are so difficult to tolerate in the body and have such a blanket effect, people will often refuse or go off them against medical advice, its only recently the medical profession has had to start listening to mental health patients about how dreadful some of the medication is for them, and how even the most severely ill person has a right to better treatment than just ones that effectively make them silent.

Anti depressant medication does not remove the depression, they mask the depression enough for the person to resume a semblance of usual behaviors, MRI scans have shown changes in the brain functioning of those with diagnosed depressive illness, and it continues even whilst on medication, its been this evidence that has brought about the now re think on Depression as a identifiable biological illness.

The ability to think in the abstract, which is a prerequisite of creative action can be learned, but for some it is also a natural function, as natural as breathing, that in itself can create problems in a society that has yet to evolve enough to support creative thinkers, would it not follow that those who can think outside the box can also think about the box itself and how society refuses to let them out of it with out condemnation?

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Paul Morgan e2
13 15.7k 6 England
15 Feb 2013 5:30PM

Quote:Many of the current medications do not restore a person to full mental well being,
they only control the extreme affect's of the symptoms, which is how the Anti psychotic medications gained the nick name "The chemical cosh"
Because these medications are so difficult to tolerate in the body and have such a blanket effect, people will often refuse or go off them against medical advice, its only recently the medical profession has had to start listening to mental health patients about how dreadful some of the medication is for them, and how even the most severely ill person has a right to better treatment than just ones that effectively make them silent



Tell me about it Sad
CathyT e2
8 7.3k 18 United Kingdom
15 Feb 2013 5:43PM
If depression comes at you like a thick blanket of dark cloud , sitting staring at the wall for hours on end neither eating or sleeping and exhausted then no amount self help does really help.....probably medication is the answer short term...just for a while. As for opening up, well, some boxes should remain closed (maybe) for many various reasons.....I suppose it depends how much it all interferes with life compared to how much devastation it will cause??

I think once the worst has lifted then there are many things you can do..... exercise everyday, dump people that drag you down ( I have a dump list)...laugh every day ....buy a dog (they are VERY funny) , eat healthily and be pro active. Go to classes, see a councillor, they will give you the tools to recognise triggers. Once you know the triggers you can head them off and break the downward spiral.

I found both these books very helpful.....opened my eyes and made me feel normal again.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Depressive-Illness-curse-strong-3rd/dp/1847092357

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Stress-related-Illness-Tim-Cantopher/dp/0859699714/ref=pd_sim_b_1/280-2607460-6761827

...photography helped me...although I have lost my Mojo for now I don't necessarily see it as a negative just one of those things for now......not worth stressing over.
Paul Morgan e2
13 15.7k 6 England
15 Feb 2013 5:50PM
CathyT e2
8 7.3k 18 United Kingdom
15 Feb 2013 6:03PM
Thanks Paul...I'll take a look.
Paul Morgan e2
13 15.7k 6 England
15 Feb 2013 6:14PM
This is taken from the same site, notes for journalist, interesting.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=oAOXxcpA32c

Last year I had to go for a mental health assessment, it scared the crap out of me.

I was eventually diagnosed with PTSD, but what I hate the most is the medication and its side effects, it dumbs me down a fair bit.
brian1208 e2
11 10.4k 12 United Kingdom
15 Feb 2013 6:56PM
A good link Paul, thanks
Camairish 9 1.3k Scotland
16 Feb 2013 1:05AM
Best advice on this thread............get a dog.
LVanDhal 2 126 1 United Kingdom
16 Feb 2013 1:56PM

Quote:This is taken from the same site, notes for journalist, interesting.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=oAOXxcpA32c

Last year I had to go for a mental health assessment, it scared the crap out of me.

I was eventually diagnosed with PTSD, but what I hate the most is the medication and its side effects, it dumbs me down a fair bit.



My first episode of mental illness when I was much younger, left me terrified, after it had passed off, I willingly took what ever was prescribed,
and clung to the idea that the medication would be a cure, I wanted to be free of the knowledge of where mental illness can take a person.

Many years down the line, I found myself questioning who am I taking this medication for ? I had grown familiar with my own mental illness, its rhythms, and depth, and perhaps most importantly that it passes, more than any medication it was the self knowledge that it will pass that kept me going through an episode.
Having added up that the majority of my life had been spent trying Medications, and spending the times free of an episode inwardly frightened of the next, I thought about taking a different approach, a selfish approach.

I have found in my experience that other people view medication for mental distress in similar terms as medication for physical distress,
that leads to a disconnect between those who have tried it, and then felt let down by it, because it isn't a cure, its more a palliative, which gets you through the worst by damping down the entire brain activity,
and those who have never needed to take it, and the assumption that it is as effective in removing the problem as say Anti biotic is on a bacterial infection.
SSRI Anti Depressants were originally devised as Anti Obesity medication !! and as anyone who's acquired the weight gain that often goes with SSRI's you are aloud a long laugh at that one.

I stopped taking medication six or so months ago, I gained permission to carry on with this approach from my psychiatrist only last week, as
I agreed that should i become unwell again I will agree to hospital admission, which is a big step forward for me personally.

From counseling I have learned that those "Boxes" are sometimes given to you by other people for their protection, not yours,
that "going mad" is what we fear most, but not "Being mad."

From Medication Of nearly thirty years I have learned that it can get you through a rough patch, but you've got to keep taking it even when the rough patch has passed as its a mask and no one can tell until you take the mask away how you are doing underneath, which is risky.

The side effects of counseling are a mild amount of frustration at how long it took before you went for it, but as any counseling professional will tell you, you only accept it when you are ready, so, lol, "rolls eyes" just wish I'd been ready sooner!
I hope this offers a positive view on life after diagnosis, and i deeply sympathize about the meds side effects, I had one lot that gave me the shakes so bad i could not drink a cup of tea, I had to have a toddler cup with a lid !!
CathyT e2
8 7.3k 18 United Kingdom
16 Feb 2013 2:47PM
Mental illness is actually a physical illness....as physical as a broken leg....if you were to dissect the brain it would show a break in the `Limbic System'....it is to be treated and recovered from in the same way........first medication to get you through the worst then self help.

Trouble is...unless you understand the fundamental functions of depression you tend to keep quiet and say nothing and think you're slowly going mad. Its the loss of control that got me...my body and mind just wasn't my own anymore....doing things I couldn't stop and reacting in a way I couldn't control.

But......you aren't going mad, you do have control and you can stop it....you just need to tame the beast.

As above...if you get into the mind set of "oh this again.....butI know it will pass" then it does......if you continually dwell and ruminate then all you'll achieve is a downward spiral. The trick is to find something that absorbs you....takes you out of yourself....you will get a glimpse of your previous self and you work from there.

Its the old black dog thing......if the dog whines and gets your attention and it wants to go for a walk, it will always want a walk.....you need to put it in its kennel till it can behave. Dont give it the attention it craves....its all about breaking learned habits .

...also take recovery slowly......its two steps forward one step back...if you rush it you put yourself back further and feel exhausted.
CathyT e2
8 7.3k 18 United Kingdom
16 Feb 2013 2:58PM

Quote:Best advice on this thread............get a dog.


....its the best advice. Learn from your dog, they wake up happy EVERY SINGLE DAY and have the most positive outlook on life. ...one we should all adopt. You have to get out the house and walk them, you get some physical exercise, you meet people you wouldn't usually talk to and they love you no matter what.

Have fun and laugh everyday..buy a dog.Grin
p12owe 1 101 2 United Kingdom
16 Feb 2013 3:22PM

Think you are wrong. You were born with your creativity which has nothing to do with your problems. Get your problems sorted and your creativity will soar - promise!


I do not believe that a person is born creative, any more than they are born a musician, artist, doctor etc. When you look at the number of "creative" people who also suffer extreme and crippling bouts of depression, there may even be a case for saying that much of that creativeness may be born out of depression, or at least the triggers of it.

I certainly believe in my case that this is so... with depession, comes confusion, a lack of self-worth, the constant need to prove ones self. All of this leads me to push harder and look far deeper than someone might if more comfortable with their lot.
Sooty_1 4 1.2k 202 United Kingdom
16 Feb 2013 6:50PM
"Get a dog" is a most facile answer. Some people do not have the wherewithal to buy, care for or home a dog. Some, feeling down at the time, do not think they have the ability to give it the time or attention it needs, nor do they know or can find out what an animal's needs are. That path is akin to "a dog is not just for Christmas" leading potentially to animals being neglected by people buying one in the hope everything will be ok, but not realising how much care it needs.
Some sufferers might not be able to work, or may be on benefits, and animals are expensive. We don't want to encourage the potential abandonment (or worse) of an animal.

This kind of therapy can be good for depressives, as they feel they need to stay well to look after an animal, but by no means all can cope. Lets face it, if some are not able to look after themselves properly, they will never cope with looking after an animal too.

This sort of thing must be put into perspective, and only taken on if it is appropriate on a case by case basis.

Nick
Paul Morgan e2
13 15.7k 6 England
16 Feb 2013 7:14PM
For me the depression is simply a side effect PTSD Sad

I agree getting a dog is not really going to help all.
CathyT e2
8 7.3k 18 United Kingdom
16 Feb 2013 8:29PM
It helped me.

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