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Photography Books

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    ray1
    ray1  10515 forum posts England1 Constructive Critique Points
    2 May 2010 - 9:31 PM

    What photography books have you found the most useful or have influenced your photography the most.

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    2 May 2010 - 9:31 PM

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    StrayCat
    StrayCat  1014446 forum posts Canada2 Constructive Critique Points
    2 May 2010 - 9:54 PM

    I haven't read Pete's book that was sold on here, but it rec'd rave reviews.

    My favourites are; John Shaw's Guide to Nature Photography, by John Shaw; and Close Ups in Nature, again by John Shaw.

    I am reading the Magic Lantern Guide to the K20D right now, and would recommend it for your camera model. It has lots of helpful tips and hints for photography in general, and a wealth of well written info on the specific camera model.

    Overread
    Overread  63746 forum posts England18 Constructive Critique Points
    2 May 2010 - 9:57 PM

    Thus far I'd have to say a few books have helped me at different stages;

    When I started out photography with a DSLR (400D) I was starting from nothing, not even a point and shoot, so everything was totaly new to me - especailly these 3 magical settings! At that time I found
    The Digital Photography Book by Scot Kelby
    A great way to get a starting point with the settings for different situations. It didn't go too far into explaining all the settings and such, but at that time I didn't need that, what I needed was a place to start working from and be able to get some decent results.

    After that I hit the forums and learnt a heck of a lot - and to this day most of my learning has come from people and websites that I have met/found online. In the offline world the book
    Understanding Exposure by Bryan Peterson
    Helped me in getting a better grip over the technicalities and creativity options with the 3 key settings in the camera.

    Since those two early books I have a few of the John Shaw books on nature photography and really must read them more in depth when I next get a chance. I've also read few generalist (read highstreet shop) nature/wildlife photography books, but overall I tend to find that they are repeating much of the basic approaches to photography and in general action and animals; with a few suggestions on typical methods in the field being skimmed over and often a little snip at the end about editing. Overall the greater content is the authors own photography itself, no bad thing, but from a book calling itself a guide I expect more words and expansion of points.
    Sadly I've yet to find a good wildlife book that really goes into the whole wildlife side of the photographic experience or even one that gives a more detailed and wholesome view to the editing side.

    justin c
    justin c  104512 forum posts England36 Constructive Critique Points
    2 May 2010 - 10:00 PM

    When first starting out I enjoyed and got inspiration from many (wildlife) photography books by photographers such as: Niall Benvie, Laurie Campbell, Paul Harcourt Davies, John Shaw, Stephen Dalton,etc. etc.
    The books still have pride of place on the book shelf but more useful resources now come from the web, i.e. articles, forum posts and I enjoy regularly browsing the latest work of many favourite photographers too.

    Last Modified By justin c at 2 May 2010 - 10:02 PM
    joolsb
    joolsb  927115 forum posts Switzerland38 Constructive Critique Points
    2 May 2010 - 10:09 PM

    Looking at a tiny image on a website is simply not comparable to lingering over a photo in a well-printed book so I am slowly putting together a library of inspirational books by the likes of Jack Dykinga, Jan Töve, Shinzo Maeda, Ansel Adams and a bunch of others.

    StrayCat
    StrayCat  1014446 forum posts Canada2 Constructive Critique Points
    2 May 2010 - 10:12 PM

    Reading is a must, but practising what you read is the most important part of the learning process. "Hands on!"

    Graywolf
    Graywolf  7964 forum posts United Kingdom
    5 May 2010 - 9:57 PM

    Nature Photography by John Shaw
    Macro Photography Robert Thompson
    Exposing Nature Frank Greenaway

    amongst many others

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