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Photography in Churches

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Carabosse
Carabosse e2 Member 1139430 forum postsCarabosse vcard England269 Constructive Critique Points
11 Oct 2012 - 1:21 AM


Quote: Gosh, how do you know - do tell!


Quote: God only knows. Wink

Good Lord, you could just be right, Jas - heaven help us! Grin

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11 Oct 2012 - 1:21 AM

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Focus_Man
Focus_Man  4481 forum posts United Kingdom631 Constructive Critique Points
11 Oct 2012 - 8:49 AM


Quote: If the church decides no photography at certain points that is it. I attended one wedding where the vicar announced there would be no photographs during the service take it or find another church as they were fed up with people not paying respect to the building or the service. so.

STRAWMAN your comment is quite offensive, please reread my text IN FULL then have a rethink.

It wasn't his property he was a 'jobsworth' - - - - as I said I my upload "Nevertheless I just laughed and carried on as I had sought the necessary permission from the correct source before carrying out the commission." ie the priest who as to perform the service, as I did with every wedding that I ever covered.

Last Modified By Focus_Man at 11 Oct 2012 - 8:53 AM
Focus_Man
Focus_Man  4481 forum posts United Kingdom631 Constructive Critique Points
11 Oct 2012 - 9:08 AM


Quote: It is the churches property, and they are allowed to ban photography if they choose to do so. Yep. It's private property - just like one's own home.


CARABOSSE you too also please reread my comments correctly and in full. thank you.

peterjones
peterjones e2 Member 123927 forum postspeterjones vcard United Kingdom1 Constructive Critique Points
11 Oct 2012 - 10:30 AM

in my experience the vast majority of UK churches do not present any barrier to amateur photography, one or two cathedrals ban photography e.g. Durham; Christchurch, Oxford encourages photography but bans tripods, most cathedrals just charge 5-10 for tripod use. Very few parish churches ban amateur photography; with my wedding photography hat on apart from a very few dinosaurs most vicars are happy for a marriage ceremony to be photographed without flash and much jumping around.

Abroad I have had little problem; I waved a tripod around Rouen cathedral and took pictures without issue or any charge; I know the French have some law about property owners having the copyright to your images or something like that but the French themselves have a very healthy disdain for the law. In a Maltese church there were some signs around forbidding photography but nobody was taking a blind bit of notice.

There are two approaches: you can go in and take photographs straightaway and accept the consequences which can be mitigated with a polite friendly response or you can research as to what permission you need.

Perhaps in the end if it seems wrong it probably is.

G' luck, Peter.

strawman
strawman  1022006 forum posts United Kingdom16 Constructive Critique Points
11 Oct 2012 - 11:45 AM

I read your text in Full with and without highlights. I have been at a wedding practice where the Vicar said to the photographer there would be no photography during the service. It is their right to do so, you being employed by people using said church does not give you automatic rights to take photo's.

If you had already sought permission why not say so to the person. The reply was in line with your own post. you were hardly being respectful about the other person involved so received as respectful a reply. What was wrong with saying to the person you had already obtained permission.

Last Modified By strawman at 11 Oct 2012 - 11:51 AM
Jestertheclown
11 Oct 2012 - 12:31 PM

Photography is banned at the school where I used to work.

In a similar vein to the above, on one occasion, the headteacher had told the audience, before the Christmas play began, that there was to be no photography.
Everyone was OK with that except for one father who thought he knew it all and claimed to have been given permission by one of the governors (who would have no right to do so), so as soon as the play began, he began taking photographs.
I doubt that he'd taken more than half a dozen before the play was halted and he was escorted from the building by the site agent.

Any parents wanting photographs of the play were able to buy prints, cheaply, from the school office, of the shots that I, as the school photographer, had been allowed to take for that purpose.

Focus_Man
Focus_Man  4481 forum posts United Kingdom631 Constructive Critique Points
11 Oct 2012 - 1:19 PM


Quote: What was wrong with saying to the person you had already obtained permission.

This guy was a 'jobsworth' he had no right to be dictating anything he was not a cathedral official just a 'jobsworth' as I said!!!!!!!!!

I did tell him but he had no right to be teklling me anything he was a 'jobsworth' OK.. just because I failed to go to a lengthy reply does not mean that my comments to him did not occur. I did say I had asked the officiating priest in advance that should be sufficient for you to realise what went on. perhaps next time I will write 1000000 words to be sure you understand.

In my wedding photographer days I always respected authorities and always asked whoever was in charge well in advance, just what and when I was permitted to take pictures inside the church, ensuring naturally that he/she was the correct person to ask. Seems a shame to have to go to such detail is that clear to you now?

Last Modified By Focus_Man at 11 Oct 2012 - 1:25 PM
lobsterboy
lobsterboy Site Moderator 1014135 forum postslobsterboy vcard United Kingdom13 Constructive Critique Points
11 Oct 2012 - 1:27 PM


Quote: he was not a cathedral official just a 'jobsworth' as I said

So if he was not a cathedral official, who did he work for? I assume he has to have a job to be a jobsworth.

Focus_Man
Focus_Man  4481 forum posts United Kingdom631 Constructive Critique Points
11 Oct 2012 - 2:07 PM


Quote: So if he was not a cathedral official, who did he work for? I assume he has to have a job to be a jobsworth.

The shop which sold the picture postcards, Enough of this how many words do I need to use to tell a quick story of somebody who does everything in the correct manner getting permission whatsoever when interrupted by a bloody jobsworth. What is your problem site moderator?

Last Modified By Focus_Man at 11 Oct 2012 - 2:08 PM
lobsterboy
lobsterboy Site Moderator 1014135 forum postslobsterboy vcard United Kingdom13 Constructive Critique Points
11 Oct 2012 - 2:11 PM


Quote: What is your problem site moderator?

Why the aggressive tone? I asked a simple question about a story which to you clearly makes sense but to those of us unfamiliar with the story didn't make much sense.

Focus_Man
Focus_Man  4481 forum posts United Kingdom631 Constructive Critique Points
11 Oct 2012 - 2:17 PM


Quote: What is your problem site moderator?

Why the aggressive tone? I asked a simple question about a story which to you clearly makes sense but to those of us unfamiliar with the story didn't make much sense.

Because I have explained the story and all people seem to be interested in is arguing the facts. Enough is enough, I have explained myself clearly about 3 messages ago.

Last Modified By Focus_Man at 11 Oct 2012 - 2:17 PM
Carabosse
Carabosse e2 Member 1139430 forum postsCarabosse vcard England269 Constructive Critique Points
11 Oct 2012 - 2:21 PM

As a general rule anyone employed by the owner of a private property, and with authority to do so, can ask you to stop taking photos. They can even use reasonable force to eject you, if you do not comply with the request.

However, in the cathedral incident cited by Frank, it is clear the message about him having permission had not been passed to the employee involved. The lack of communication is hardly anything unusual. All that needs to be said, in such instances, is that you have permission and to invite the employee concerned to check that with his/her employer should it be desired.

lobsterboy
lobsterboy Site Moderator 1014135 forum postslobsterboy vcard United Kingdom13 Constructive Critique Points
11 Oct 2012 - 2:21 PM

Oh I see it's our fault for not understanding what you typed....

Fair enough, if you say so.

Focus_Man
Focus_Man  4481 forum posts United Kingdom631 Constructive Critique Points
11 Oct 2012 - 2:25 PM


Quote: Oh I see it's our fault for not understanding what you typed....
.

In a nutshell not 'our fault' you made the comments so 'your fault' YES. If you read my first mention of this all IS QUITE CLEAR.

Last Modified By Focus_Man at 11 Oct 2012 - 2:25 PM
lobsterboy
lobsterboy Site Moderator 1014135 forum postslobsterboy vcard United Kingdom13 Constructive Critique Points
11 Oct 2012 - 2:33 PM


Quote: If you read my first mention of this all IS QUITE CLEAR.

To you...
To me it made absolutely no sense whatsoever.

Sheesh - Sorry for taking an interest in your comments. It clearly seems to upset you a lot when people do that. I will try not to be so interested in future.

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