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Photography of Rain by a Point-and-Shoot camera


b_chat e2
2 3 India
5 Sep 2012 4:16AM
A Point-and-shoot camera with an auto focus is unable to produce good detail of rain photographs...
Any Suggestion?...Should i use flash everytime...?

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mikehit e2
5 7.1k 11 United Kingdom
5 Sep 2012 8:56AM
Does the camera have focus lock? By which I mean you can focus, keep the shutter button half-pressed and it will stay focussed at that distance? You can then focus on something at the distance you want and then compose the picture you want.
StuartAt e2
10 1.1k 6 England
5 Sep 2012 12:27PM
When you say 'detail of rain photographs' what exactly do you mean? Are you referring to rain falling, or when it hits the ground/subject. Do you want to freeze the movement in front of something else, or capture the splash as it hits the subject?

I suspect to capture falling rain you would almost certainly need to use flash, due to the transparent nature of the subject, and the speed it is moving at. A point and shoot will have further issues, because you can't manually focus and it will need to 'lock on' to something for focus.

If you provide more info on the type of photo you are after, I'm sure someone can provide some more advice on the bast way to achieve it.
dandeakin e2
7 207 3 England
5 Sep 2012 1:10PM
You might find this useful:

http://www.ephotozine.com/user/dandeakin-67058/gallery/photo/run-for-cover-19143949

I would suggest
1) shooting at the telephoto end of your zoom
2) wait for some really heavy thunderstorms
3) shoot into any sunlight / bright sky so the rain drops are backlit
4) compose so you have a dark background to make the rain drops stand out (eg the side if a building in shadow)
dandeakin e2
7 207 3 England
5 Sep 2012 1:13PM
PS you don't have to worry about focusing on a point and shoot as everything will be in focus anyway given DOF from the small sensor.

Flash would light up rain drops close to the light source but the light would fall off rapidly so I can't see flash being of much use.
Paul Morgan e2
13 16.1k 6 England
5 Sep 2012 1:41PM
Use a good torch.
mikehit e2
5 7.1k 11 United Kingdom
5 Sep 2012 1:50PM

Quote:PS you don't have to worry about focusing on a point and shoot as everything will be in focus anyway given DOF from the small sensor.
.



DOF is due to the short focal-length lenses used in compacts and is nothing to do with sensor size.
User_Removed 5 4.6k 1 Scotland
5 Sep 2012 1:59PM

Quote:PS you don't have to worry about focusing on a point and shoot as everything will be in focus anyway given DOF from the small sensor.
.

DOF is due to the short focal-length lenses used in compacts and is nothing to do with sensor size.



Technically true. But, of course, the short focal length of the lenses is a direct consequence of using a small sensor size. Or vice-versa.
dandeakin e2
7 207 3 England
5 Sep 2012 2:56PM
"DOF is due to the short focal-length lenses used in compacts and is nothing to do with sensor size"

Whatever.
mikehit e2
5 7.1k 11 United Kingdom
5 Sep 2012 3:20PM
Nit-picking maybe but I have seen a lot of posts over the years where people get all sorts of misconceptions about what can and can't be achieved because early in their hobby people gave unnecessarily simplistic explanations. And in this case it was just as easy to say 'the lens used' as it was to say 'the small sensor'. No offence intended.
b_chat e2
2 3 India
5 Sep 2012 3:36PM
@StuartAt...yes, by "detail of rain photographs" i meant the falling of rain...precisely, the extent of rain drops...
By the way,what abt ISO and Aperture ??...Should i maintain high ISO for this type of pic???
b_chat e2
2 3 India
5 Sep 2012 3:38PM
Moreover...what type of editing can be done???....B n W???
5 Oct 2012 11:01AM
When it comes to Aperture, go for a narrow aperture as it helps retain things in sharpness, however this will be at the cost of light - a narrower aperture means less light hitting the sensor. You have to compensate for this, and one way can be ISO. However, note that compacts are notorious when it comes to Noise from high ISOs, so raising ISO should be your last resort in my opinion.

Try to shoot when it's not completely dark, as it can help your picture in no small way. In too much darkness, your camera's limitations will hamper your artistic intent, so keep that in mind. If shooting at night, a tip I can give you is to try and include as many lamps or street lighting as possible as these will illuminate the drops in their light-path. Otherwise, shoot during the day when it's just a drizzle or light rain and the place is still lit from some sunlight.

As regards editing, the sky's the limit I guess. Whatever suits your fancy. Black & white can be nice if applied properly.

Good luck and practice, best way to learn more.

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