Take your photography to the next level and beyond...

  • NEWS
  • REVIEWS
  • INSPIRATION
  • COMMUNITY
  • COMPETITIONS

Why not join for free today?

Join for Free

Your total photography experience starts here


Pricing


Coleslaw e2
9 13.4k 28 Wales
25 May 2013 4:01PM
I have been invited to set up my studio lighting in a private event in London, which would have over 90 participants. As it is a special event, I have said yes.
I could charge for either prints or digi files to the people who wish to have their portraits taken. I am not too bother about making much profit, as long as I could cover my own expenses, anything else is bonus. I plan to shoot tethered so that I could show them the shots immediately and take the orders at the same time.
I might either just sell the digil files (no really extra cost to me) or just 16/18 inches prints. I am just trying to see what people would recommend me to charge.
Any suggestions or advice would be much appreciated.
Cheers.

Join ePHOTOzine for free and remove these adverts.

Chrism8 e2
8 754 14 England
25 May 2013 4:11PM
My suggestion would be a straight 5 for the digi image as a Jpeg, nice easy round figure, pitch any more and they may baulk at say 10, other figures will involve loads of change.

I've some experience at selling Shooting images recently and imo this works
25 May 2013 4:17PM
OK, here goes:

- People will no buy digi files
- People will not buy 16/18 inch prints
- You will need you and an assistant to work the laptop and show people while you shoot
- People won't order to buy later - they will want to see and buy then and they will want it in a protective folder and a protective bag
- They certainly won't buy from your website after it either. so forget that too

But on the bright side:

- They will buy a print straight from the shoot there and then
- They will buy at around 10x8 inch or smaller
- They will buy if at the right price, but as you're not interested in making much of a profit, charge 1 each for the prints and you're still in 75% profit margin category

Just my experience, take it or leave it...
collywobles e2
10 3.4k 9 United Kingdom
25 May 2013 5:04PM
I have attended a number of events similar to what you describe (mainly Masonic Ladies Evenings) and the charges that I can remember were 12 for an 8X6 print in a card folder. I did not see a great response from people but they did sell some prints and only assume costs were covered.
puertouk e2
3 1.1k 17 United Kingdom
26 May 2013 10:57AM
1 per print! You're having a laugh aren't you. Where's the profit at 1 per print? The ink and paper alone will take how much from the profit? Then there's the rent to cover. I would not be doing prints on the spot. What happens if you have a problem with the printer? Put the image(s) on a CD for 6.50 or offer a printing service, say with Whitewall. Have a list of the type of print they can have and charge them accordingly. It shows that you are professional by using a company like Whitewall.
LensYews e2
6 1.3k 1 United Kingdom
23 Jun 2013 1:52AM
Coming to this late, so this may have already happened, but I'd suggest you do need an assistant who can draw people in, manage a queue and sell images to those who are wavering. To make anything from it you need to print on the night, which means a sub-dye so 7x5, 9x6 or 12x8 usually - you can rent one from system insight if you can't borrow one. You'll need public liability insurance, pat tested equipment, etc. 90 people doesn't sound many, and you can probably only expect interest from a maximum of 60%. So pricing will depend very much on your costs and your business model, as a guestimate, costs: travel 50, event contribution 20, assistant 40, printer rental 130, electricity rental 10, printing costs 36, 50 slip-in strut mounts & bags 60, other fixed & variable costs, etc. As for pricing you'll probably get 20 sales, so assuming you're selling 9x6 images, 400 costs divided by 20 gives you 20 per image, and from there adjust up by what ever profit you want to make.

People will accept technically difficulties like printer breakdowns, a backup plan might be to take envelopes with you, have the customer write their name and address on the envelope and put the order form (get a contact number on the form just in case of a mix up), after confirming the image number with them in the envelope. Makes your life easier dealing with prints after the event.

tip: if its a light hearted crowd and there's a bar, take a box of props, hats, feather scarfs, that kind of thing. You'll get people keep coming back to dress up and have new photos in different costumes.
ade_mcfade e2
10 15.1k 216 England
23 Jun 2013 10:01AM

Quote:OK, here goes:

- People will no buy digi files
- People will not buy 16/18 inch prints
- You will need you and an assistant to work the laptop and show people while you shoot
- People won't order to buy later - they will want to see and buy then and they will want it in a protective folder and a protective bag
- They certainly won't buy from your website after it either. so forget that too

But on the bright side:

- They will buy a print straight from the shoot there and then
- They will buy at around 10x8 inch or smaller
- They will buy if at the right price, but as you're not interested in making much of a profit, charge 1 each for the prints and you're still in 75% profit margin category

Just my experience, take it or leave it...



best advice you can get Smile

I've had exactly the same experience - though only really done it a couple of times, not really my thing.

the main thing I learned is that people never never never ever buy after the event.... even for charity. I offered to do a profit split for a charity I liked... the prints were pretty cheap too.

you can shove the gallery down their throat on email/facebook etc. but they will maybe look at the gallery, but never click the "buy print" button.

get them when they're pissed - get their money there and then.

Sign In

You must be a member to leave a comment.

ePHOTOzine, the web's friendliest photography community.

Join For Free

Upload photos, chat with photographers, win prizes and much more.