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Pros are ace, amateurs are not......

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ade_mcfade
ade_mcfade e2 Member 1014807 forum postsade_mcfade vcard England216 Constructive Critique Points
28 Feb 2011 - 3:22 PM

.....this seems to be the end result of a lot of debates on EPZ this last year, people getting all stressed about the great divide between those who earn and those do it for fun.

Always seems to end up with 1000 reasons why one's better than the other, everyone assumes that pros can magically do everything, yet amateurs are incapable... Wink

So in the spirit of the GRUMPY GROUP, free up the rest of the forum from this perpetual debate and lance those pro/am debate boils into this melting pot!

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28 Feb 2011 - 3:22 PM

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bppowell
bppowell  122125 forum posts England2 Constructive Critique Points
28 Feb 2011 - 3:46 PM

What about the in betweeners?

Barry

digicammad
digicammad  1121988 forum posts United Kingdom37 Constructive Critique Points
28 Feb 2011 - 3:48 PM

I've been both and can honestly say my photography was just as brilliant as a pro as it is as an amateur! It just wasn't quite as satisfying due to having to cater for a customer's wishes instead of my own.

Also, as an amateur my enjoyment of photography is not spoiled by the knowledge I will spend the next 3-6 months chasing the customers for payment.

Ian

ade_mcfade
ade_mcfade e2 Member 1014807 forum postsade_mcfade vcard England216 Constructive Critique Points
28 Feb 2011 - 3:52 PM

biggest difference I've seen since going pro is that I'm always at networking meetings

actually, I'm learning how to use InDesign properly today, had a go "jumping in at the deep end" and got nowhere, so got a DVD to guide me.

digicammad
digicammad  1121988 forum posts United Kingdom37 Constructive Critique Points
28 Feb 2011 - 3:56 PM

Breakfast meetings are the best Ade. Even if you have to put up with people you wouldn't normally go near at least you get some bacon and egg. Grin

jken
jken  81672 forum posts United Kingdom1 Constructive Critique Points
28 Feb 2011 - 4:02 PM

Indesign is a daunting little beast when you first use it Ade.

CathyT
CathyT e2 Member 87276 forum postsCathyT vcard United Kingdom18 Constructive Critique Points
28 Feb 2011 - 4:06 PM

I think the hardest part in InDesign is designing the template.....once thats done its easy. I use it for Calendars.

Tiz a steep learning curve.

Last Modified By CathyT at 28 Feb 2011 - 4:06 PM
ade_mcfade
ade_mcfade e2 Member 1014807 forum postsade_mcfade vcard England216 Constructive Critique Points
28 Feb 2011 - 4:18 PM

Yeah - I'm on chapter 3 or 4 on this DVD and thank god I know Photoshop, there are commonalities between them which is handy - just the way the environment works.

I think its worth persevering with anyway - if I can save money on paying designers, that's all good Wink

ade_mcfade
ade_mcfade e2 Member 1014807 forum postsade_mcfade vcard England216 Constructive Critique Points
28 Feb 2011 - 4:20 PM

Ian - I've been to a brekky one a few times, not really sentient at that time of day though, I prefer the evening ones like the Yorkshire Mafia, they are in bars with beer flowing - seriously! You turn up and have a few ales whilst making connections...

sut68
sut68 e2 Member 111997 forum postssut68 vcard England76 Constructive Critique Points
28 Feb 2011 - 4:22 PM


Quote: I'm learning how to use InDesign properly today, had a go "jumping in at the deep end" and got nowhere, so got a DVD to guide me.

... it's all about styles Ade, once you get your head around them it's easy enough. Easier to fathom than QuarkXpress, especially if you're new to it.

Last Modified By sut68 at 28 Feb 2011 - 4:25 PM
JackAllTog
JackAllTog e2 Member 53623 forum postsJackAllTog vcard United Kingdom58 Constructive Critique Points
28 Feb 2011 - 7:02 PM

An amateur may be wanting to prove they are good by making a few sales - e.g. me.
A pro is typically often justifying why he needs to charge so much when the customers friend can do it for almost free and micro stock is so cheap. The pro may have years of experience and awards, professional memberships and backup kit. The pro needs to feed his family and amateurs have some small potential to damage that.
Most business are built by well educated hard working individuals, but every so often a barrow boy overcomes obstacles and suceeds - that's life!
But pro's do remember keen amatures pay for most of the R&D in camera equipment, your current camera is what it is due to amateur demand. And keen amatures can often help prospective clients see why a pro is essential.

scottishphototours


Quote: But pro's do remember keen amatures pay for most of the R&D in camera equipment, your current camera is what it is due to amateur demand.

Eh?!!!

So the development of 52-point autofocus using mciro stepper motors to drive the focus motor while being linked to a dynaic metering system was driven by amateur demands??

I think you'll find that the developments that most mainstream consumer grade cameras benefit from - AF, matrix metering, motordrives, TTL flash metering, wireless systems, multi-choice menus setups, dual card slots, multiple file outputs, etc etc - have all been by-products of professional users demands to the camera companies over many years. These developments to me have made their consumer grade products (note - not "amateur" products) more appealing and easier to use to the mass market, and this has resulted in the boom of photography over the last 30 years.

When I was 15, it was a Praktica MTL3. Now we see some junior members on here using 5D MKII's - that's how much the equipment has evolved in 30 years.

scottishphototours

Sorry - that should be "micro" and "dynamic"......

Alan_Warriner
28 Feb 2011 - 9:00 PM


Quote: Quote:But pro's do remember keen amatures pay for most of the R&D in camera equipment, your current camera is what it is due to amateur demand.
Eh?!!!

So the development of 52-point autofocus using mciro stepper motors to drive the focus motor while being linked to a dynaic metering system was driven by amateur demands??

Without a doubt, amateurs are where the camera companies make their money

ade_mcfade
ade_mcfade e2 Member 1014807 forum postsade_mcfade vcard England216 Constructive Critique Points
28 Feb 2011 - 9:49 PM

is like Mercedes - the top end cars get the bells and whistles first, then they gradually get fitted to the lower end ones.

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