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DrFeelgood
3 Jul 2012 - 9:41 AM

The majority of my photos are taken while hiking using a Panasonic Lumix DSC FS-30. I am keen to upgrade to improve picture quality and have more control over exposure, but I would like to stick with a compact camera that will fit in my pocket. I have been considering the Sony Cybershot DSC HX10V. My question is do you think I would see any appreciable difference in picture quality?

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seahawk
seahawk e2 Member 6488 forum postsseahawk vcard United Kingdom
3 Jul 2012 - 9:57 AM

Don't know about the Sony but I have a Lumix LX5 which I got because it shoots RAW and I think it's excellent. I got mine for the same reason - I don't want to carry DSLR while hiking. The LX5 is not the smallest but is very robust. If you want small ie. pocket-size then look at Canon S95 or S100.

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User_Removed
3 Jul 2012 - 9:59 AM

It really depends how you view your photographs. If you only ever view them on a computer monitor or as an A4 print, then any camera with a 5Mp or higher sensor will give you all the quality you can detect.

Where a more "advanced" camera might help is in terms of taking photographs in poor light or under other "difficult" conditions. Not so much "image quality" as "convenience". It might also allow tighter crops, have a larger zoom range or similar factors.

.

Last Modified By User_Removed at 3 Jul 2012 - 10:00 AM Helpful Post! This post was flagged as helpful
mikehit
mikehit e2 Member 45766 forum postsmikehit vcard United Kingdom9 Constructive Critique Points
3 Jul 2012 - 10:02 AM

Largely, you get whatyou pay for so I would say 'yes'. But a review says that it has limited manual mode so may not be what you want.
For the same price I would go for the Canon S95 or (for a bit more) S100 - you have the option of full manual, exposure compensation and you can also shoot RAW as well as jpeg to give you even more flexibility. Andt it fits in a jeans pocket.
I have the S90 and think it is superb.

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DrFeelgood
3 Jul 2012 - 10:03 AM

Thanks for the advice, many reviews are recommending the Canon S100 even though it has a small zoom range. I suppose I will have to make some compromises.

SlowSong
SlowSong e2 Member 53992 forum postsSlowSong vcard England28 Constructive Critique Points
3 Jul 2012 - 11:07 AM

I've got the S100 and its performance in low light is excellent. Noise is negligible even in very low light situations. This image of a concert audience has no noise reduction used at all. Taken at F4.5, 1/13th, ISO 1600.





Last Modified By SlowSong at 3 Jul 2012 - 11:11 AM Helpful Post! This post was flagged as helpful
Carabosse
Carabosse e2 Member 1139367 forum postsCarabosse vcard England269 Constructive Critique Points
3 Jul 2012 - 12:29 PM

I was very tempted to get a Canon S100 because of the quality and low-light usability. But it's restricted zoom led me to get the Canon Ixus 230 HS instead (8x zoom).

Did I make the right decison? Hmm.......... not sure! Grin

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daviewat
daviewat  104103 forum posts Scotland
3 Jul 2012 - 1:19 PM

The new TZ30 From Panasonic is pretty dammed good and with 35 pound cashback going it comes out reasonable value as well Smile

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Carabosse
Carabosse e2 Member 1139367 forum postsCarabosse vcard England269 Constructive Critique Points
3 Jul 2012 - 1:35 PM

One of the downsides of the Canon S series is the small aperture at the upper end of the zoom. On the S100 it is f5.9 at (FF equiv) 120mm. The Panny TZ30 zooms out to (again FF equiv) 480mm..... and manages f6.4, so you can be sure at 120mm it is a much wider aperture than f5.9. The price you pay for that is a max aperture of f3.3 compared with f2 on the Canon at 24mm equiv.

Really depends on how much low light work you intend doing. If the camera is for hiking, one assumes not much?

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Carabosse
Carabosse e2 Member 1139367 forum postsCarabosse vcard England269 Constructive Critique Points
3 Jul 2012 - 2:46 PM

Another possibility is the Olympus XZ-1. F1.8 lens (which manages f2.5 even at FF equiv 112mm) and got 5 stars for performance in the EPZ review. It has come down from 400 to 270.

This could tempt me away from my Ixus, but again a restricted zoom range.

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DrFeelgood
3 Jul 2012 - 3:30 PM

I don't anticipate much low light work, on the contrary, by the time I have hiked to my destination it is usually midday. (The worst time to take landscape photos, according to the magazines!). I have made a list of requirements.
1/ image quality
2/ 24 - 200+ zoom
3/ bright screen (921k)
4/ manual or at least aperture priority

Anything else I should be looking for for landscape photoraphy?

mikehit
mikehit e2 Member 45766 forum postsmikehit vcard United Kingdom9 Constructive Critique Points
3 Jul 2012 - 4:29 PM

What do you mean by 'image quality'? It sounds a daft question but everyone has their own definition. When a camera has a 10x zoom (the ratio of longest to shorted focal length) you will be taking a hit on image quality comapred to one with a 3x or 4x range.
If you will be viewing your pictures only on a screen, I think you would do just as well getting one of the cameras above and cropping the image
.

Quote:
Anything else I should be looking for for landscape photoraphy?

Actually none of the things you list are 'required' for landsape photography - they are functions that you personally would like to have. One thing I would recommend is a monopod to help hold the camera steady - you can get some that are a walking pole with a screw mount on the top for your camera or a light monopod you can easily strop to your backpack.

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User_Removed
3 Jul 2012 - 5:21 PM


Quote: - you can get some that are a walking pole with a screw mount on the top for your camera .

For hiking or hillwalking, that is a great suggestion.

Paul Morgan
Paul Morgan e2 Member 1214388 forum postsPaul Morgan vcard England6 Constructive Critique Points
3 Jul 2012 - 5:32 PM

What ever you get there`s going to be some compromise somewhere.

These will be to big for a trouser pocket but there plenty of bum/small belt bags.

Fuji X10

Olympus XZ-1


Quote: 1/ image quality
2/ 24 - 200+ zoom
3/ bright screen (921k)
4/ manual or at least aperture priority

The detachable EVF is pretty much the same as found on the EM5, 1.5 million dots and is very good, also dead handy for low level use.

Last Modified By Paul Morgan at 3 Jul 2012 - 5:38 PM Helpful Post! This post was flagged as helpful
neil163
neil163  2 United Kingdom
3 Jul 2012 - 6:24 PM

sony Hx20v does is all well you have to work hard to make it fail on gold setting, never misses . dont worry when it takes multi shots it takes the best lighting shadows etc brilliant NEIL

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