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Raw vs JPEG Is it worth the extra space and effort?

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Paul Morgan
Paul Morgan e2 Member 1315383 forum postsPaul Morgan vcard England6 Constructive Critique Points
25 Mar 2014 - 10:36 PM


Quote: Yep only because the out of camera jpegs were once so bad.

no they weren't

If your getting it all right in camera, is there any point.

yes

It makes a whole load of sense to some people, but its still good do have a raw backup just in case.

The raw is the seed - which you can grow in which ever way you like - you may choose to edit it as bright colourful thing one day, then return and from the same DNA, create a moody, dark mono

I wouldn't call it a "backup"


no they weren't


You said so yourself earlier on in this thread Ade Smile

And its getting talked about a lot these days.

http://www.smallcamerabigpicture.com/what-are-you-shooting-this-weekend/

Each has there place and given the choice I use both but prefer raw, you can do so much more with a raw.

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25 Mar 2014 - 10:36 PM

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ade_mcfade
ade_mcfade e2 Member 1014816 forum postsade_mcfade vcard England216 Constructive Critique Points
25 Mar 2014 - 10:45 PM

they'e always been bad...

Paul Morgan
Paul Morgan e2 Member 1315383 forum postsPaul Morgan vcard England6 Constructive Critique Points
25 Mar 2014 - 10:52 PM

I think the jpeg has improved a lot, but so has the raw software and the power of the average PC.

I can now apply settings to 40 or 50 raw files and save them as tiffs, jpegs or what ever, in this same amount of time it would have taken me to simply open up a raw program using an older PC a few yours ago.

ade_mcfade
ade_mcfade e2 Member 1014816 forum postsade_mcfade vcard England216 Constructive Critique Points
25 Mar 2014 - 11:01 PM

think we're agreed Smile

I still find it hard to believe anyone would choose JPG over RAW, but I guess there is no accounting for taste - or perhaps it's just ignorance ?

I'll have to do a youtube vid on it...

Paul Morgan
Paul Morgan e2 Member 1315383 forum postsPaul Morgan vcard England6 Constructive Critique Points
25 Mar 2014 - 11:27 PM

think we're agreed

Jeh I`m not really disagreeing Smile

StrayCat
StrayCat e2 Member 1014816 forum postsStrayCat vcard Canada2 Constructive Critique Points
26 Mar 2014 - 4:52 AM

I found working on RAW files a huge task till I started using Canon's DPP, which made it no more difficult than working on jpegs. Then when I moved on to Olympus, I buckled down and finally came to terms with LR4, which I had tried before, but gave up on. This time I used Adobe's tutorials on their website, and it all came together. I now use it in conjunction with onOne programs, and I'm happy with it. If you go along and are continually concerned with storage space, you're not going to get much enjoyment out of it. Spend a little over 100 pounds and get yourself a 3 TB external drive, and your worrying days are over.

It took me a long time to switch to RAW due to laziness.

Last Modified By StrayCat at 26 Mar 2014 - 4:53 AM
ade_mcfade
ade_mcfade e2 Member 1014816 forum postsade_mcfade vcard England216 Constructive Critique Points
26 Mar 2014 - 9:09 AM

so is it fair to say that really just "ignorance" which would make people choose JPG over RAW?

TanyaH
TanyaH e2 Member 11532 forum postsTanyaH vcard United Kingdom40 Constructive Critique Points
26 Mar 2014 - 11:06 AM

I wouldn't say 'ignorance' at all ... it all depends on what they want to do with the images. If someone takes JPEGs on holiday, and just wants to upload them onto Face(less)Book or whatever, then JPEG is absolutely fine. If they want to (as you said earlier) develop the seed of an image time and time again, depending on either mood, feeling or intended output, then RAW's the way to go.

Last Modified By TanyaH at 26 Mar 2014 - 11:06 AM
MichaelMelb_AU
26 Mar 2014 - 11:26 AM

One man's "laziness" or "ignorance" may be others necessity. As for now, no camera takes series of RAWs and series of JPGs with the same speed and same number of shots. This may be vital with sports or when trying to catch a particularly interesting aspect of any fast moving action.

As I have said above - all depends on requirements and circumstances. One thing I am pretty sure about - a photographer who can not take a good JPG will never match or excel it with RAW. Skill matters.

derekhansen
derekhansen e2 Member 5185 forum postsderekhansen vcard United Kingdom23 Constructive Critique Points
26 Mar 2014 - 12:49 PM

A camera is a machine. Shooting only Jpegs effectively hands a large degree of control to that machine (or at least the people who created the 'in camera' settings) I want as much control as I can get when it comes to the images I produce. That's why I shoot RAW not Jpeg..

Paul Morgan
Paul Morgan e2 Member 1315383 forum postsPaul Morgan vcard England6 Constructive Critique Points
26 Mar 2014 - 4:13 PM

A camera is a machine. Shooting only Jpegs effectively hands a large degree of control to that machine (or at least the people who created the 'in camera' settings) I want as much control as I can get when it comes to the images I produce. That's why I shoot RAW not Jpeg.

This is were a lot of people get mislead, it it assumed that the camera sets it all up for jpegs, but it don`t, you can also tell the camera what setting to use.

Once upon a time we all shot film, and probably less than 1% of us ever processed our own, the end result sat with the lab, yet most of us were still happy.

The same goes for Jpeg, I guess the figures that amount to raw usage is again less than 1%, and most of those using jpeg only are still happy.

As I have said above - all depends on requirements and circumstances. One thing I am pretty sure about - a photographer who can not take a good JPG will never match or excel it with RAW. Skill matter
s.

This is the best place for a beginner to start, let the camera do the processing and concentrate on getting most of it right in camera to begin with.

Last Modified By Paul Morgan at 26 Mar 2014 - 4:16 PM
goexplorephotography

Im a pro photographer and i do shoot in RAW,
the main reasons are i sometimes shoot once in a life events. so if one day i do make a bit of a mistake on the exposure i have a bit more ability to bring something back from the image. Plus i can get an extra stop on the dynamic range. i can also adjust the WB if needed (but even that can be overcome with a jpeg).
my clients also like the option to print big. so that extra detail really does help. but i am talking big poster or banner size.

Apart from that there not much that couldn't be done with a jpeg.

I also run workshops, and i find a lot of people turn up saying they shoot RAW for the extra image quality. The reality is their editing skills don't match those that are built into their camera. and so there final images tend to be a bit flat and soft. So in those cases i recommend they stick with jpeg or shoot jpeg & RAW until their editing skills are at an adequate level. You will learn a lot more about being a photographer by taking photographs. than sitting in front of a screen.

Being a professional photography is all about making things as simple and getting it right in camera, setting your camera up and pressing as little buttons as possible. You also want to reduce the amount of time it takes from camera to client. If clients wants preview shots quickly i shoot both jpeg & raw so i can email them the jpeg copies quickly. on all occasions they think the jpeg is the finished image and over the moon with them.

If you are happy with how your images look as a jpeg, then bugger what everyone else does. its your photography and your images. it doesn't matter how you took the photograph. its what you think of them that important. or in my case what the person who's paying thinks of them.

You have a good camera so image quality is not a problem. composition is much more important

Garreth

Chris_L
Chris_L e2 Member 924 forum postsChris_L vcard United Kingdom
22 Jul 2014 - 4:59 AM






This is good with real examples


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N0j8QMmglvw

StrayCat
StrayCat e2 Member 1014816 forum postsStrayCat vcard Canada2 Constructive Critique Points
22 Jul 2014 - 7:28 AM

I'm going back to using RAW again, thanks John.

StrayCat
StrayCat e2 Member 1014816 forum postsStrayCat vcard Canada2 Constructive Critique Points
23 Jul 2014 - 11:50 PM

Ok, I spent an evening taking photos in RAW, I should have done RAW+jpeg for a comparison. I think my problem is my skills at developing RAW images aren't anywhere near as good as the processing in-camera of jpeg files, therefore, the extra information is wasted on me. I seem to do better using jpeg. Next time out I'll use both.

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