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Resolution Export Settings for ePhotozine Uploads


Merlin_k e2
6 6 2 Netherlands
5 Jun 2011 6:44PM
I currently use Lightroom 3. Up until now in order to upload files to ePhotozine I have transfered them to Photoshop CS3, resized them to 1000 pixels and then saved to web (and have fialed to work out how to include the exif data). I have just realised (doh, I know) that I can export straight from Lightroom in a format that will be fine for ePhotozine uploads. I have even worked out most of the settings I need - JPEG, limit file size to 400k (premium member), resize to fit long edge to 1000 pixels. I am left with one setting I don't know, what should the resolutio pixels per inch be set to? Is 360 too high?

Any guidance appreciated. Thanks.

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lobsterboy e2
11 14.3k 13 United Kingdom
5 Jun 2011 6:50PM
I'm pretty sure pixels per inch doesn't matter for websites.
I seem to remember being told to use 72ppi once but it seems to make no difference AFAICS.
mattw e2
11 5.2k 10 United Kingdom
5 Jun 2011 7:06PM

Quote:I seem to remember being told to use 72ppi once but it seems to make no difference AFAICS.

When viewing on a computer screen, the pixels per inch is governed by the resolution of the monitor, regardless of what it says in the image file.

The Pixels Per Inch setting is only used when making a physical copy of the image (i.e. printing it)
redsnappa e2
12 2.0k United Kingdom
5 Jun 2011 7:23PM
The image size settings for uploading photos to ephotozine is a very common topic & it seems that even experience photographers have experience with this.

To help those who experience problems resizing images would it possible for ephotozine towers to make available a photoshop Action that would create an image the optimum size for uploading to ephotozine galleries.
User_Removed 10 17.9k 8 Norway
5 Jun 2011 7:34PM

Quote:I seem to remember being told to use 72ppi once but it seems to make no difference AFAICS.


... but 'getting it right' (in PPI-terms) from the outset means that sharpening attributes you have applied are not f****d about with by the website algorithms.

Wink
User_Removed 5 4.6k 1 Scotland
5 Jun 2011 7:38PM
72 is the best. Any more just increases file size for no benefit when viewed on a monitor.
Sabreur e2
9 767 England
5 Jun 2011 11:54PM

Quote:72 is the best. Any more just increases file size for no benefit when viewed on a monitor.


?? It doesn't matter. Just set the pixel dimensions correctly. The ppi setting could be 1 or 1000 and it will look the same on screen.
6 Jun 2011 8:51AM
72ppi is a good choice as if someone tries to steel your image from EPZ it's only going to be any good for use on screen, a print from a 72ppi file would tell the viewer it was off the web and most probably nicked.
User_Removed 10 3.3k 4 United Kingdom
6 Jun 2011 9:34AM
Mike, LeftForum and Jken, Guys I'm afraid you're completely wrong about this.

It doesn't matter whether you label it as 72ppi or 720ppi the file size will be the same. A browser won't treat it any differently, neither will your printer or the photo service at ASDA, Photobox etc. It won't make any difference to sharpening or anything else

Only certain software (like InDesign Desk Top Publishing) will use the ppi to determine how much space to take up on the page. That's it.

Read this

Do your own experiments
Jestertheclown
6 6.6k 242 England
6 Jun 2011 1:32PM
I bookmarked that article last time it appeared on here Chris and I think it makes a lot of sense.

By trade, I'm a letterpress printer and in the old days, when such a trade still existed, we used to print photograhic images using something called a "half-tone" which was effectively a metal plate with an image set upon it, using thousands of dots. The more dots there were in a given area, (dots per square inch or DPI) the better the replication of the photograph could be expected to be.
Up to a point.
If there were too many dots, the gaps would fill up and the quality would drop.
Too few and you'd see the gaps, making the image looked washed out.
In other words, the larger the half-tone was physically, the more dots you'd need to get the desired result.
Unfortunately, we referred to this spread of dots and their ability to reproduce an image as "resolution."
And therein, possibly, lies the source of the confusion.

Jester.
Carabosse e2
11 39.7k 269 England
6 Jun 2011 1:47PM

Quote:It doesn't matter whether you label it as 72ppi or 720ppi the file size will be the same.


Totally agree. It makes no difference to your file size or anything else.

And yes, unfortunately ppi and dpi seem to be used interchangeably these days,
gaelldew e2
7 290 United Kingdom
6 Jun 2011 4:34PM

Quote: then saved to web (and have fialed to work out how to include the exif data).
Any guidance appreciated. Thanks.



Use " Save as " to include it.
7 Jun 2011 1:53PM

Quote:Mike, LeftForum and Jken, Guys I'm afraid you're completely wrong about this.

It doesn't matter whether you label it as 72ppi or 720ppi the file size will be the same. A browser won't treat it any differently, neither will your printer or the photo service at ASDA, Photobox etc. It won't make any difference to sharpening or anything else

Only certain software (like InDesign Desk Top Publishing) will use the ppi to determine how much space to take up on the page. That's it.

Read this

Do your own experiments



I was just giving a guide to help the guy standardize Chris. Just makes it easier for people if they don't know. Of course the file size will be the same, but if it's used to print from it's going to be *****.
Carabosse e2
11 39.7k 269 England
7 Jun 2011 2:25PM
'ppi' is used when judging what size of print you can make from the resolution of the photo. It is totally irrelevant when it comes to merely saving or exporting an image. The setting can be safely be disregarded.

Photos can be printed in the range 150-300ppi depending on the size of the image and the distance from which it is to be viewed. 200ppi is usually a good all round figure although industry standard (magazines etc) is 300ppi. If we are talking about very large prints which are to be viewed from quite a long way away, then it is often OK to drop to 150ppi. The quality of the original, not just the resolution, has to be factored into all of this, of course.

Example: Merlin is, I think, using a Canon 40D. Resolution 3888x2592 pixels. At 200ppi you can get photos of up to 19"x13". At the more demanding 300ppi the max would be 13"x9". Beyond those sizes you would need to use interpolative upsizing.

But, just to reiterate, it makes no difference what the setting is when you save or export. Just ignore it. Smile
Sabreur e2
9 767 England
7 Jun 2011 8:11PM

Quote:
I was just giving a guide to help the guy standardize Chris. Just makes it easier for people if they don't know. Of course the file size will be the same, but if it's used to print from it's going to be *****.



It won't make any difference. A file that is 1200 pixels by 800, say, will print the same whether the resolution setting is 72 dpi or 300 dpi - it is the number of pixels that matters.

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