Login or Join Now

Upload your photos, chat, win prizes and much more

Username:
Password:
Remember Me

Can't Access your Account?

New to ePHOTOzine? Join ePHOTOzine for free!

Like 0

Scottish referendum.

Join Now

Join ePHOTOzine, the friendliest photography community.

Upload photos, chat with photographers, win prizes and much more for free!

collywobles
16 Feb 2014 - 10:56 AM

It will be interesting to see how the vote will go.

Sponsored Links
Sponsored Links 
16 Feb 2014 - 10:56 AM

Join ePHOTOzine for free and remove these adverts.

thewilliam
16 Feb 2014 - 11:25 AM

The Czech republic and Slovakia went their separate ways and survived.

daviewat
daviewat  104104 forum posts Scotland
16 Feb 2014 - 11:35 AM


Quote: Google's great

If you need it , yes Smile

parallax
parallax e2 Member 5116 forum postsparallax vcard United Kingdom
16 Feb 2014 - 12:16 PM

This situation is just an attempt at a power grab by Salmond and co., so he can swan about as the self appointed King of Scotland. Digging up old Braveheart grievances and anti English sentiments. He's a sly old fox granted and the London centric toffs have played into his hands but the Scots are not daft. Where are the hard facts in the proposals? There's not that much oil left to fund their utopia.

collywobles
16 Feb 2014 - 12:56 PM

The latest news is interesting, that all UK parties have said that Scotland cannot retain the pound sterling and Barrosa has adamantly stated that Scotland will have to apply to join the EU which means they will have to take on the Euro. DOH! Mr Salmon......... sort of shot yourself in the foot.....

saltireblue
saltireblue Site Moderator 43913 forum postssaltireblue vcard Norway25 Constructive Critique Points
16 Feb 2014 - 1:51 PM


Quote: This situation is just an attempt at a power grab by Salmond and co., so he can swan about as the self appointed King of Scotland.

I heard that Salmond has publicly stated that he is not interested in becoming the first (modern) king, or president of Scotland.
In the unlikely event of the vote being in favour of devolution, then he will step down.

Andy_Cundell
16 Feb 2014 - 1:58 PM


Quote: This situation is just an attempt at a power grab by Salmond and co., so he can swan about as the self appointed King of Scotland.
I heard that Salmond has publicly stated that he is not interested in becoming the first (modern) king, or president of Scotland.
In the unlikely event of the vote being in favour of devolution, then he will step down.

He will step down so he doesn't have to clean all the mess up!!! There will be a hell of a lot of it to clean!!!

mikehit
mikehit  56449 forum posts United Kingdom9 Constructive Critique Points
16 Feb 2014 - 2:02 PM


Quote: Does anyone understand wats totally involved in this. iv not seen or heard anyone that totally understands wat the end result will be wat ever the out come.will they understand fully wat theyr asked to vote for ?

That's the problem- they don't because no-one else does.

In 1999, Salmond called the pound 'a millstone round Scotland's neck' - yet as soon as the Chancellor suggests they will not have the pound, the SNP claim he is playing politics and bullying the Scottish voters. There is also a massive difference between 'Scotland using they pound' (they could use the US dollar if they wanted) and having currency union where the government in London underwrites the Scottish monetary system - a differentiation that Salmond I am sure is quite happy to cloud the issue so he can let the UK Govt piss off the voters an feed his independence vote.
But this spat came after Salmond claimed Scotland would join the EU and use the Euro all without any negotiation necessary. A point on which the EU ministers were very quick to put him right.
The rapid rebuttal of all these 'claims' suggests to me (and many others) that Salmond doesn't actually know what is going to happen after the independence vote. Everyone is voting blind.

And, of course, there is the oil. All of the SNPs claims about Scotland being a nett contributor to the UK are based on the assumption that all of the oil belongs to Scotland and good luck to them on that one after independence!!


But there is one important issue that is not being discussed. The vote in September is one about independence in principle. If they vote 'yes' it is only then that they actually negotiate with Westminster about what terms and conditions, and whether it goes ahead at all - and what if the terms are not as favourable as Salmond suggests? Do they have another referendum north of the border to see if they want to go ahead with it? Or, more fundamentally, with Salmond being so instrumental in all of this it seems that people are voting not so much for independence as for Alex Salmond himself - but what if he is not the first minister when negotiations start or after independence is granted?

thewilliam
16 Feb 2014 - 2:24 PM

Scotland already has its own pound and several of the banks issue currency. The only difference is that it won't be tied to Sterling but that wasn't a problem for Ireland when they used the Punt. US and Canadian dollars have a different value but who gets confused?

nickthompson
16 Feb 2014 - 3:50 PM

If Scotland become independent, will they truly be independent or just an autonomous state? What happens regarding the welfare benefits and the NHS in Scotland. Does it mean there will be no money coming from Westminster/England to maintain these? If so surely that's better for us as it's less money to hand out. Has Scotland got the money to cover these?

Nick

Eastlands
Eastlands e2 Member 3649 forum postsEastlands vcard Northern Ireland3 Constructive Critique Points
16 Feb 2014 - 4:18 PM

What if London could vote to be independent with King Boris as its leader, now that is something I would vote for if I had a vote.

mikehit
mikehit  56449 forum posts United Kingdom9 Constructive Critique Points
16 Feb 2014 - 4:19 PM


Quote: Scotland already has its own pound and several of the banks issue currency. The only difference is that it won't be tied to Sterling but that wasn't a problem for Ireland when they used the Punt. US and Canadian dollars have a different value but who gets confused?

That is where the confusion comes in - Scotland can use a currency called 'the pound', 'the dollar' or the 'spouting Salmond' and they can peg that currency against the pound. What won't happen (according to the three parties this week) is a link where the decisions in Westminster affect the Scottish currency unless the Socttish Parliament decides to peg the Scots pound to the UK pound. Nor would any financial problems in Scotland necessarily affect the financial decisions made in Westminster.

This is what happened to Ireland - they kept the pound and decided to peg it to the UK pound at a 1:1 rate. But UK took decisions in its own interests, not those of Ireland and eventually Ireland decided to break that link and went their own way calling the Pound the punt.

Last Modified By mikehit at 16 Feb 2014 - 4:20 PM
mikehit
mikehit  56449 forum posts United Kingdom9 Constructive Critique Points
16 Feb 2014 - 4:22 PM


Quote: Has Scotland got the money to cover these?

Nick

Very questionable - which is why Salmond's financial predictions rely on owning nearly all oil revenue.

seahawk
seahawk e2 Member 7557 forum postsseahawk vcard United Kingdom
16 Feb 2014 - 4:50 PM

Some weeks ago it was reported that Orkney & Shetland, who do not tend to vote SNP, may consider seceding from Scotland in the event of a 'Yes' vote and apply to rejoin Norway. (They were part of the dowry of Margaret of Norway when she was promised in marriage to Prince Edward of England in the 13th Century; their children were to rule both England and Scotland. Margaret died in Orkney in 1290 while en route to Scotland therefore she never actually set foot in Scotland and that raises the question of whether the dowry remained valid and left Scotland with a succession crisis leading to the Wars of Independence.) Salmond dismissed this as nonsense. Gordon Wilson, former SNP leader and an intelligent man, pointed out in an article that this could not be 'dismissed' - this had to be taken seriously and negotiations opened with those islands if a 'Yes' vote was forthcoming. If Orkney and Shetland returned to Norway, Salmond wouldn't have any oil revenue! Where would that leave Scotland then? There is a view that Scotland had no legal right to keep Orkney and Shetland as the marriage never took place.

I'm an Englishman who's lived in Dumfries & Galloway since 1975; my wife is local. This region and Scottish Borders did not vote for the SNP at the last election and are likely to vote against independence in the referendum. This raises the question 'could D & G and Borders secede from Scotland and remain with England and the rest of the UK'? Lots of people round here would probably be in favour of that though I'm not aware of a legal mechanism for doing it.

Last Modified By seahawk at 16 Feb 2014 - 4:58 PM
seahawk
seahawk e2 Member 7557 forum postsseahawk vcard United Kingdom
16 Feb 2014 - 5:08 PM

I must correct my previous comment as follows:-

Orkney & Shetland were offered as security by the King of Norway against the payment of the dowry of his daughter Margaret on her marriage to the James III, King of Scotland, in 1469. The dowry was never paid and so the islands were annexed to Scotland in 1471. Whether this was legal or not has been questioned.

(Sorry, I had confused the 2 Margarets)

Add a Comment

You must be a member to leave a comment

Username:
Password:
Remember me:
Un-tick this box if you want to login each time you visit.