Take your photography to the next level and beyond...

  • NEWS
  • REVIEWS
  • INSPIRATION
  • COMMUNITY
  • COMPETITIONS

Why not join for free today?

Join for Free

Your total photography experience starts here


PRIZES GALORE! Enter The ePHOTOzine Exclusive Christmas Prize Draw; Over £10,000 Worth of Prizes! Plus A Gift For Everybody On Christmas Day!

Selling in a restaurant


phil_24 8 532 2 England
12 Oct 2008 9:49PM
Ok, Im desiging a website at the moment for a restaurant in my area and during one of our meetings I took in some of my photos for him to ahve a look at.

He sells artwork and photographic reprints in his restuarant and they start at around 150 to around 400 - I counted 2 with sold stickers on too and one wrapped up and ready to be picked up.

Anyway, he said he wanted to do this with my photos too - the best bit is he doesnt take a commision....AT ALL! What they sell for, I will get.

Im going to get one pritned to start with, on canvas and at a decent size...Ide be interested to know two things.

1. what price you think I can sell MY photos for
2. where I should get them printed on canvas to increase my profit margins

Oh, and bare in mind im 16

Phil

Join ePHOTOzine for free and remove these adverts.

Lou_C 7 755 2 England
12 Oct 2008 10:18PM
If you're only 16 Phil get someone to check the legalities. You're too young to make a contract at 16, you have to be over 18. Therefore it could be a get out clause for him not to pay you because there is no legal contract. You might need to get your mum or dad to make the contract on your behalf.
lobsterboy e2
11 14.3k 13 United Kingdom
12 Oct 2008 10:24PM

Quote:where I should get them printed on canvas to increase my profit margins


You'll only increase your margins if it actually sells...otherwise you have simply parted with a lot of money for a canvas print that is gracing someone elses walls.
phil_24 8 532 2 England
13 Oct 2008 8:01AM
Ok - I spose it could seem like I am going to be taken advantage of becuase of my age from what I wrote...

...but Ive been doing website design for over a year now for various businesses, have neer signed a contract and have always been payed - Im already doing his website for him and I trust him, the same way he trusts me to get his website done on time.

Maybe I should no ask the question of where can i get a good canvas print printed for a relatively cheap price - anything up to around 40-50
joolsb 10 27.1k 38 Switzerland
13 Oct 2008 8:12AM
Why do you think putting it on canvas is going to make a difference? If the photos are any good, surely it's better to print them on a medium which shows them to their best advantage - be that gloss, matte, art paper or canvas?

In any case, shouldn't it be up to the customer to decide how they want the image presented?
phil_24 8 532 2 England
13 Oct 2008 8:28AM
Ok - well the restaurant owner only has canvases on show and says he would only really want to show canvases too - He keeps selling them too so im not going to complain...Im just going to cross my fingers
dasantillo 9 231 1 Wales
13 Oct 2008 8:28AM
I find a lot of the time, the customer won't necessarily know what they want until it's placed in front of them. They may not consider canvas if they just see a print, for example, possibly because they find it difficult to imagine how it will look printed on a different medium. Doing canvases do have a larger amount of risk in the cost involved, but when they sell the profit margin is much higher.

Personally, I find canvas prints add a lot of depth to the photo and are very good at grabbing attention. At craft fairs, if I display a 40x12" panorama canvas, it draws people in and is often a talking point.

Maybe you could try doing 1 or 2 canvases and the rest prints to see how it goes?
phil_24 8 532 2 England
13 Oct 2008 8:37AM
Its a could suggestion - having a mix and match of mediums...

I might take in a canvas to him to put up along with a framed, average sized print and see what he thinks.
lobsterboy e2
11 14.3k 13 United Kingdom
13 Oct 2008 8:42AM
Phil - have you considered if you are selling one-offs, open editions or limited editions yet?
This can have an effect on the price people are willing to pay.
JBA 6 341 1 United Kingdom
13 Oct 2008 9:09AM
Framing a print under glass proffesionally is expensive too don't forget. And a big print under glass is heavy. Canvas is light. You are going to have to fork out to start with i guess. i hope you sell a few prints. Good luck.
Jon
agoreira 11 6.0k Wales
13 Oct 2008 9:46AM

Quote:Phil - have you considered if you are selling one-offs, open editions or limited editions yet?
This can have an effect on the price people are willing to pay.



You might be right, but personally I would not pay more because it was a limited edition, unless it was someone well known. I see lots of people selling prints limited to 100, 200, 250 etc, the majority are dreaming if they think they will sell more than a handful. Maybe one in a million will go on to become famous and thus make the print more valuable, but the huge majority will not be worth anymore than what you originally paid for it. And the only reason for buying a LE print, is that it may go up in price, otherwise why pay extra. If it works fine, but for me, the "run of the mill tog" selling LE prints is a nonsense, there will be a very limited number of the prints sold anyway because not sufficient people will be interested. I bet the number of people here that have reached the max number of their limited run will be in single figures, especially if the limit is 250. Id be thinking of doing a LE of 2 maybe! Wink
lobsterboy e2
11 14.3k 13 United Kingdom
13 Oct 2008 9:56AM
Well it makes a difference to the people I sell to Wink

Though the point I was making to Phil was that 400 for an original painting is one thing but few people would pay that money for a photo if they think you are going to run off hundreds of them.
agoreira 11 6.0k Wales
13 Oct 2008 1:15PM

Quote:Well it makes a difference to the people I sell to




If it works, don't knock it! Wink Maybe it's just me, but I don't buy into this LE stuff. As I said, most of the stuff we would sell, would be a very limited edition anyway.
phil_24 8 532 2 England
14 Oct 2008 8:19AM
I have considered the idea of one-offs, limited editions etc but have not come to a conclusion yet - Im only 16 and its a tough one....any ideas?
lobsterboy e2
11 14.3k 13 United Kingdom
14 Oct 2008 8:29AM
Well for the moment I would just go with open editions (i.e. print as many as you like). Stick some on the wall and see what sells.

Sign In

You must be a member to leave a comment.

ePHOTOzine, the web's friendliest photography community.

Join For Free

Upload photos, chat with photographers, win prizes and much more.