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selling my photos


jme 3 Australia
3 May 2011 8:48AM
I'm looking at getting into extreme sports photography (skate parks, motocross ect) and was wondering if anyone could give me some advice on how I go about selling my shots. I know about stock photos but I cant see that making me much money or much of a future in it. My major goal would be to shoot for a sporting mag.
Any help would be gr8.

Thanks. Jayme

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Ian-Munro 7 200 15 Wales
3 May 2011 8:53AM
IMO you won't go far wrong approaching actual skaters and motor X competitors directly. Usually they love to see images of themselves especially if they are done well and processed well etc.

I would maybe suggest getting a PF of the said competitors and approacking them with the images and offer your sevices for future events or commissions.

I know that the surfers here in Wales and also the mountain bikers are always on the look out for images.

Ian
Andy_Cundell 3 1.1k 5 England
3 May 2011 9:12AM
You beat me to it Ian!

Also, try going to events and 'take orders' for pictures of competitors with an advertising stand. This may put you under a bit of pressure to produce good quality images but with good advertising it could fill your day and your wallet. Some people will wonder "Why has he got a camera man after him, Oh, they booked him for the event, he has a desk/ stall over there."

Good Luck!

Andy
Pete e2
13 18.7k 96 England
3 May 2011 9:37AM
Following on from Ian's advice, once you have a good portfolio, pick out some of your very best and submit to one or two magazines editorial departments. We have an article on submitting to magazines . It's design for those wanting to break into the photography market but much of the advice reaches all markets. The main thing to do in the cover letter is explain what aspects you can cover and your location coverage/ flexibility etc. Key thing is to find out if they have a freelance budget and what they need covering.

The BFP's Freelance photographer's Market Handbook has a good list of most magazines, freelance requirements and editorial contacts for UK, perhaps there's a similar product in Australia?
User_Removed 5 4.6k 1 Scotland
3 May 2011 10:07AM
In the "olden days" Pete's advice would have been spot on. Back in the 60s/80s I sold a lot of photographs to magazines and, even at the price levels in those days, images for interior use would get 10 - 20 and good MF trannies for covers could get 100.

However, many magazine publishers no longer maintain their own photo libraries, preferring to search the online stock image libraries to meet their needs.

Often a more profitable strategy with specialist magazines is to write articles and use your own photographs to illustrate the articles. In those cases, editors may use the pics you submit, rather than go searching for stock images to suit your article.
PhillipMinnis 4 94 4 Australia
3 May 2011 1:29PM

Quote:In the "olden days" Pete's advice would have been spot on. Back in the 60s/80s I sold a lot of photographs to magazines and, even at the price levels in those days, images for interior use would get 10 - 20 and good MF trannies for covers could get 100.

However, many magazine publishers no longer maintain their own photo libraries, preferring to search the online stock image libraries to meet their needs.

Often a more profitable strategy with specialist magazines is to write articles and use your own photographs to illustrate the articles. In those cases, editors may use the pics you submit, rather than go searching for stock images to suit your article.



I have to agree with you! These days, there are microstock sites that have in excess of 10 million shots in their libraries. The cost of 'generic' images fitting this description costs just a fraction of having a professional photographer shoot images.

I have over 1500 images on 13 microstock photography sites, and I earn several thousands of dollars each year this way. Some of my images have sold over 200 times. It's bad for some professional photographers that it's gone this way, however, it seems to be the way this digital age is going.
LensYews 6 1.3k 1 United Kingdom
3 May 2011 9:58PM
I agree with Ian and Andy, and recommend you go down the route of selling to the competitors. The key is in how you market yourself. Go to a few of the larger local events, see who is working there and get chatting with them, and ask them who they sell to - some will be happy to talk to you. You will soon get a pretty good idea of where there are gaps in the market. You can roughly expect to sell to 4% of competitors through a website or 20% by printing on site (higher costs as you will need Sales staff). You will find both sports are community based and word of mouth will get you sales once you are known. Having competed in the sports helps as well as you then have a better idea of the kind if shots the rider will want. You can always sell to magazines and stock as well, but remember you may need model and/or property releases to do so and that's not always easy for everyone in shot (according to my legal advisor that includes spectators!). News publications you can probably do on an editorial rights basis.

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