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setting up a photography studio

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    joekinerman
    26 May 2013 - 9:30 PM

    in the next couple of months im planning on setting up a photography studio business from home to shoot hair photography as thats the industry im involved in already.

    i was wondering if anyone had some advice on this, do's dont's etc

    also equipment people couldn't do without in the studio.

    what sort of prices people started charging for a days shoot etc.

    any advice would be great. thanks

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    thewilliam
    27 May 2013 - 3:59 PM

    I'd visit an already successful hair studio and find out what lights they use.

    We have lighting that will cope with most things but there are two of us sharing the facility. For any one task, only about a quarter of the our lighting kit will be used so it's a good idea to find out what's needed before you go shopping. The Broncolor kit that we use is too expensive to be sitting idle!

    In a studio, you don't need the latest cameras because you'll probably be using base ISO. Something like a Nikon D2Xs would perform as well as you need. To get the hair sharp, you'll need a good lens and the Nikon 24-70 will do the job well.

    ade_mcfade
    ade_mcfade  1014564 forum posts England216 Constructive Critique Points
    27 May 2013 - 4:54 PM

    I saw a talk by a hair photographer at Focus a few years ago, looked pretty involved - wish I could remember the set up. I think there were 2 back lights to create interesting background patters, a light on a boom over head with a grid, couple of rim lights, a key light (large softbox) and reflector...

    but that would be about 5 years ago... so hazy memories now.

    I don't have/use studios so can't really say what I couldn't do without.

    you're in the industry so best positioned to work out the day-rate - or even if people "need" you for a day? Maybe think of packages - e.g. X hours + Y edited high res photos = úZ - that kinda thing.

    thewilliam
    27 May 2013 - 6:15 PM

    One friend, who's a fashion photographer, told me that his pictures need to have this today's look and not the look that was selling yesterday.

    Find out who took the pix in the top hairdressing journals and take your lead from them.

    JackAllTog
    JackAllTog e2 Member 53471 forum postsJackAllTog vcard United Kingdom58 Constructive Critique Points
    28 May 2013 - 1:04 PM


    Quote: business from home........equipment people couldn't do without in the studio.......

    Space is the thing I most miss, will you have enough to separate you and the model and you and the background? Also the space and time for the hair dresser to work their magic before the shoot? I had a pro MUA come round once and lost the entire kitchen as a makeup room and lost the models for an hour before I took the first shot.

    Some kind of insurance if your running the business at home? If you are in the business already would you end up competing with your current employers and would poaching clients be legal?

    thewilliam
    28 May 2013 - 2:18 PM

    If you have customers visit your home, you'll need to tell your house insurer. Many are frightened off when people run a business from home and your cover would be invalid. The insurer is going to look for a way to wriggle out of paying when faced with a claim for 500k, or worse. Tell them at the outset.

    One of the very few insurers who will offer cover is NFU Mutual because it's run by farmers who've always run a business from home!

    goexplorephotography

    I agree NFU are good for insurance, but they probably wont charge much more for working from home. So you can get good business insurance fron Aaduki. As regards lighting equipment. Look at a continuous lighting system. Very easy to use and perfect for head shots. Much cheaper too than flash systems.

    thewilliam
    28 May 2013 - 11:21 PM

    I wasn't referring to business insurance. Most household insurers seem to get frightened off when they see an increased risk such as customers visiting the home. Any increased risk needs to be declared.

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