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Carabosse
Carabosse e2 Member 1139497 forum postsCarabosse vcard England269 Constructive Critique Points
11 Dec 2005 - 10:34 AM

Hang on, Frank - you said you'd posted a pic: where is it if not in your folio?

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11 Dec 2005 - 10:34 AM

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barnowl
barnowl  9697 forum posts
11 Dec 2005 - 10:40 AM

Hey, what about the settings on my 10D.

Carabosse
Carabosse e2 Member 1139497 forum postsCarabosse vcard England269 Constructive Critique Points
11 Dec 2005 - 10:42 AM

Oh who cares! Grin





................sorry! Wink

barnowl
barnowl  9697 forum posts
11 Dec 2005 - 10:43 AM

Fine. Walks off in huff catching big toe on the skirting board on the way out.

Craftysnapper
11 Dec 2005 - 10:44 AM

LOL I just love the sense of humour on these forums...it is humour isn't it? Wink

Paul

barnowl
barnowl  9697 forum posts
11 Dec 2005 - 10:48 AM

Not when you've just walked in to the skirting board.

agoreira
agoreira  106001 forum posts Wales
11 Dec 2005 - 11:22 AM

Try this then Gary!

Carabosse
Carabosse e2 Member 1139497 forum postsCarabosse vcard England269 Constructive Critique Points
11 Dec 2005 - 11:26 AM

Gary, the general advice is that if you intend to use your pics commercially (books, mags), Adobe 1998 is the way to go: it is the industry standard.

But if you are just taking pics for your own use, you may find you get better results by sticking with sRGB.

AdrianTurner
11 Dec 2005 - 11:36 AM

Intrigued, why would that give better results? CB.

Carabosse
Carabosse e2 Member 1139497 forum postsCarabosse vcard England269 Constructive Critique Points
11 Dec 2005 - 12:12 PM

The sensor in your camera is sRGB. It captures the colour range equivalent to sRGB and not Adobe 1998. Thus if you select Adobe 1998 on your camera the camera processes the sRGB data to give Adobe 1998. But you are still capturing in sRGB.

You can do exactly the same conversion in PS. However, most PCs are sRGB-based and most printers' default profiles are also sRGB-based. So you may find you actually get better results using sRGB. I have seen comparisons and Adobe 1998 can look a little flat.

However, if you want to send your pics to mags etc you will have to convert to Adobe 1998, because they will generally only accept that.

Hope that helps!

barnowl
barnowl  9697 forum posts
11 Dec 2005 - 12:29 PM

So by converting in PS and saving you will save in Adobe RGB. Have I understood that correctly. Elements 3 was much simpler.

Carabosse
Carabosse e2 Member 1139497 forum postsCarabosse vcard England269 Constructive Critique Points
11 Dec 2005 - 12:32 PM

You can convert to Adobe RGB but it is still a conversion - whether your camera does it or whether you do it in imaging software. The capture is still in sRGB, whatever your camera setting, so you can't have anything that wasn't there in the first place!

barnowl
barnowl  9697 forum posts
11 Dec 2005 - 12:35 PM

OK thanks. My eyes are seeing 256 bloody colours after all the reading I've been doing.

AdrianTurner
11 Dec 2005 - 12:59 PM

Gary, please read page 58 of the 10D manual where you will find that though CB is correct in some of his points i.e. commercial printing. He is off the mark when intimating that sRGB is better for post processing on a PC. The only time Adobe 1998 RGB will look flat in comparison with sRGB is if you are viewing in a sRGB colour space and the point to this thread is that your workflow is Adobe 1998 RGB, in addition to this most modern printers allow you to set Adobe 1998 RGB as your default and many Labs honour a number of embedded colour profiles, you can bet that Adobe 1998 RGB will be honoured by these Labs.

Excerpts from manual.
top of page 58
The camera is compatible with the sRGB and Adobe RGB colour spaces

selecting Adobe RGB
Select Adobe RGB if you want to use a personal computer to adjust the colour saturation or if.

Images captured with Adobe RGB . no mention of in-camera conversion from sRGB to be found.

Hope this is of some help

Adrian.

Carabosse
Carabosse e2 Member 1139497 forum postsCarabosse vcard England269 Constructive Critique Points
11 Dec 2005 - 1:02 PM


Quote: He is off the mark when intimating that sRGB is better for post processing on a PC.

I think you are in danger of misrepresenting what I have said. Re-read carefully!

Gary should try all the possible methods to see what works best on his setup.

You can bet your life that images captured on a 10D's sensor will be in sRGB!

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