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SH 1Ds Mk II price

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patters
patters  91781 forum posts United Kingdom1 Constructive Critique Points
5 Sep 2011 - 1:54 PM

London Camera Exchange offered me 'between 5-600 squids' for my 1Ds Mk II body in a part ex for a 5D Mk II. Any opinions on if I could get more for it in the classifieds or on eBay? I cant see others for sale anywhere and so don't know how much they go for (mint nic but no box etc, just cam & charger

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ChrisV
ChrisV  7725 forum posts United Kingdom26 Constructive Critique Points
5 Sep 2011 - 2:05 PM

I see four on ebay at the moment. [click the link to view].

They seem to be around the £1,200 mark on BiN. So it doesn't sound like you're being offered a particularly great deal and it may well be worth the hassle of selling it yourself. Trade-ins don't very often offer market value...

User_Removed
5 Sep 2011 - 2:23 PM


Quote: Trade-ins don't very often offer market value...

Trade-ins will NEVER offer market value... - it's called Business.

Wink

patters
patters  91781 forum posts United Kingdom1 Constructive Critique Points
5 Sep 2011 - 2:42 PM

I suppose I could stick it on eBay with a reserve of 700 and see what happens? Never sold anything on eBay before, quite exciting really Smile

Carabosse
Carabosse e2 Member 1139389 forum postsCarabosse vcard England269 Constructive Critique Points
5 Sep 2011 - 2:45 PM

Be brave and stick it on at 99p - no reserve. It will find its level, don't worry... but the low starting price and no reserve pull in the punters! Wink

patters
patters  91781 forum posts United Kingdom1 Constructive Critique Points
5 Sep 2011 - 5:10 PM

and Carabosse gets a new camera for his collection for a pound!

Carabosse
Carabosse e2 Member 1139389 forum postsCarabosse vcard England269 Constructive Critique Points
5 Sep 2011 - 5:19 PM

Damn.................. I've been sussed! Sad

Lol! Grin I have done this for everything I have sold on eBay, including stuff for which I wanted even more than you are looking for, for the 1DsII. I have always got a pleasing result. Smile

ChrisV
ChrisV  7725 forum posts United Kingdom26 Constructive Critique Points
5 Sep 2011 - 5:24 PM

I agree with Carabosse here - if you start low with no reserve it will cost a lot less [almost free] to list - and it will gain you attention virtually straight away. I really don't think there's all that much of a risk it would fetch less than £700 - if there's any demand for something it will get something like a 'true' market value, which should be over a grand. You'll need to factor in eBay's commission. A lot of bidders [I'm one of them] will leave it until the very last moment to put in a substantial bid - so you might be sweating a bit close to the finish time.

Proxy bids may pile in during the last few seconds! If you lose your nerve you can always withdraw from sale before the auction closes and only pay the listing fee - it's legitimate to say you've had an offer off-line for more than the currently highest bid. If you allow the auction to close however, eBay will expect you to sell to the highest bidder as long as they fulfill their bid.

As for trade-ins not offering market value - it depends what margin they're making on the price of what you're buying. You lose one way or the other!

BarrieNeilPhotography

Personally, it would be a very brave man (or a very.. no I won't go there Grin) to put a valuable item to auction either without reserve or without a realistic starting price. My partner and I buy and sell on eBay and at conventional auctions very frequently (collectibles and ceramics mainly) and you'll be surprised how often something without reserve does NOT make its true market value (last week we bought a £400+ Moorcroft bowl for £15 as it had no reserve and had been slipped in at the end of the sale).

Listing fees are comparatively small (a few pounds) compared to the value of an item and the amount you could lose if it doesn't reach its true potential and it DOES happen.

I've got a Nikon 70-200 f/2.8 lens on there at the moment and I started it at a price I would be happy for it to go at; no point otherwise is there?

Your choice of course but for the sake of a few quid, is it worth the risk? Smile

Last Modified By BarrieNeilPhotography at 5 Sep 2011 - 5:42 PM
colin beeley
colin beeley e2 Member 111070 forum postscolin beeley vcard England10 Constructive Critique Points
5 Sep 2011 - 5:53 PM

why do you want to swap ? the 1d camera's feel much better in the hand.

patters
patters  91781 forum posts United Kingdom1 Constructive Critique Points
5 Sep 2011 - 6:17 PM

I havent the gumption to put a camera I paid 5 grand for up for 99p !
I fancy something smaller and the 5d has some cool features and what seems like a better processor, sensor etc, and I'm fed up with the permanent grip adding to the bulk, quite a few reasons really, oh, and 1/3rd lighter!

rogerfry
rogerfry e2 Member 8501 forum postsrogerfry vcard United Kingdom
5 Sep 2011 - 9:23 PM

Go ahead and put it on ebay with no reserve....you'll definitely achieve a realistic price at the end of the day. If you put too high a price on as a starting point, a lot of people won't bother to watch your item, and you can wind up with no sale. (Once the item is up and running, the seller can keep track of the number of people watching their item). As has been said above, the serious bidders will wait right up to the last minute to bid, and it's normally in the last minute that you get your best bids. We've sold two 5D mk I bodies and a Hasselblad 30mm Xpan lens on ebay, all starting with no reserve, and they all reached a realistic selling price.....all of them in the last five minutes of the auctions........not too good for your heart rate, but quite exciting ! ..(and much better than you'll get in p/ex.)

User_Removed
5 Sep 2011 - 11:20 PM

Take the 600 quid part ex for it. As an ebay newbie you will attract a lot less bids than a seller with good feedback and you won't be as wise to potential scams as an experienced ebayer. You will still pay a big chunk of the final selling price to ebay and you will pay PayPal a percentage on the transaction.

colin beeley
colin beeley e2 Member 111070 forum postscolin beeley vcard England10 Constructive Critique Points
6 Sep 2011 - 6:35 AM

if i were you i would not take that £600 that's taking the piss ! i would stick it on ebay try a buy by now if you don't have the bottle to go for the auction , 1d mk II still go for £500 to £ 600 , 1d mk III for £1200 + . when you get your money i would not buy from London Camera Exchange either the piss takers ! take a look here. another thing as well the 5d II has been out a while now there must be a new one soon .

Last Modified By colin beeley at 6 Sep 2011 - 6:37 AM
BarrieNeilPhotography


Quote: when you get your money i would not buy from London Camera Exchange either the piss takers

That's really harsh. A dealer has massive overheads that have to be paid for. If they buy in equipment they are making a financial commitment in equipment they may not even really want (they have to find the money from somewhere) and in theory, they could have that money tied up for months. As I said before, they have to pay staff, rent, rates, heating etc etc etc (all the costs with running a retail operation which believe me having done it, are massive) and then if they are lucky, make a profit which is then taxed. As I mentioned before, most offer a guarantee which has to be paid for too (most have their guarantees underwritten by a third party which also has to be paid for).

So before launching into to the use of impolite epithets, have a thought for the dealers. Their profit margins on equipment is in fact extremely low (on a new body Nikon D3s for instance retailing at over £3500, the margin can be as low as £125 - less than 5%).

Smile

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