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779HOB
779HOB  21020 forum posts United Kingdom
6 Nov 2012 - 7:45 PM

I actually don't mind the cookies on sites that track what I am looking at - I have had some pretty good targeted advertising chucked my way because of it. I'd rather have advertising for things I might actually be interested in than crap I am not.

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pulsar69
pulsar69  101611 forum posts United Kingdom6 Constructive Critique Points
6 Nov 2012 - 7:59 PM

We really do make too much hoo-haa about things sometimes , facebook isn't really that bothered about our images and for most of us it is an important networking tool, I have copyright logos on things i am bothered about and to be fair all small print aside I have not agreed to anyone using my images to make money and if i found they did in some major way then would take action. Facebook would not really want to be going to court with small photographers, it just isn't worth their while they can get images from so many other places.

So whilst yes I agree there can be an issue I think it is being blown out of all proportion as usual with the media just wanting to get their hooks into another successful business and tear it down, and lets face it that's the same media that has been hacking our phones and spying on us for years !

Lets all just get back to sharing and enjoying images Smile

User_Removed
7 Nov 2012 - 12:22 PM


Quote: Bugs - very entertaining - do you hide you IP address too?

don't need to - have dynamic IP- it just goes back to the ISP.

User_Removed
7 Nov 2012 - 12:34 PM


Quote: We really do make too much hoo-haa about things sometimes , facebook isn't really that bothered about our images and for most of us it is an important networking tool, I have copyright logos on things i am bothered about and to be fair all small print aside I have not agreed to anyone using my images to make money and if i found they did in some major way then would take action. Facebook would not really want to be going to court with small photographers, it just isn't worth their while they can get images from so many other places.

So whilst yes I agree there can be an issue I think it is being blown out of all proportion as usual with the media just wanting to get their hooks into another successful business and tear it down, and lets face it that's the same media that has been hacking our phones and spying on us for years !

Lets all just get back to sharing and enjoying images Smile

Look for the most part FB's T & C's are aimed at allowing them to do the necessary sharing to make the site function. However I do think they go a step or two further than is absolutely necessary. EPZ must have similar conditions built into their T & C's enabling them to publish your photos on the site, but they don't strip you of all your rights - so right there is proof that a site can gain the necessary permissions to run the site without stripping you of your rights of ownership of the material.

And the problem is not so much FB itself (even though the article I originally posted stated as much), it is what happens when your photo is taken from FB .. you have no recourse against it because essentially you have no rights and FB isn't going to sue one of their advertisers for "stealing" one of their images. Some of those targeted adverts attach their advertising to your photos / posts and use it as if it is theirs. Some people have had their photos used for online dating sites and others far less innocuously have been posted on porn sites.

By all accounts it is a long arduous and never ending battle to get stuff taken down from those sites once that happens. And while it may make an amusing story to read about when it happens to some one else, or something to tut-tut about when it happens to some one else's kids - the fact remains that it is preventable if you take precautions from the get go and understand that anything on the net is there for every one to see and use.

So if you don't like the idea of your face being used to advertise the before photo of some anti-aging treatment or your kids photos being put on some kiddy porn site - protect your photos, protect your privacy and only put stuff you don't mind the whole world seeing and knowing on the net.

Last Modified By User_Removed at 7 Nov 2012 - 12:35 PM
mattw
mattw  105189 forum posts United Kingdom10 Constructive Critique Points
7 Nov 2012 - 1:17 PM

So, the evil fbook empire sneakily collects all our personal data... and uses it for their evil plot....

To show me ads for things I may actually be interested in???

Are we being a bit paranoid here?

Carabosse
Carabosse e2 Member 1139452 forum postsCarabosse vcard England269 Constructive Critique Points
7 Nov 2012 - 1:29 PM


Quote: So, the evil fbook empire sneakily collects all our personal data... and uses it for their evil plot....

To show me ads for things I may actually be interested in???

Scary, eh? Lol! Grin

whipspeed
whipspeed e2 Member 104040 forum postswhipspeed vcard United Kingdom22 Constructive Critique Points
7 Nov 2012 - 1:43 PM

To be honest, how many shots of kids are going to end up on porn sites, apart from the shots these people horrendously make themselves. Most people I know happily post shots of their kids fully clothed, both on here, facebook and other websites I am a member of & I don't think that is the sort of shots these freaks get their rocks off on. I am a Mum myself & post shots of my lad (although he is now 21 & says he doesn't think they would be interested in him) & I find all this scaremongering about a paedo on every corner & nicking every photo you may post online to be really quite scaremongering. You've posted twice now about photo's being taken for online dating sites and porn sites, I wonder if you have you personal experience of this or has it happened to people you know? If so I can understand you worry, but I think that is probably a tiny, tiny percentage, most images nicked on the web are going to be for general sites where people want a stock image but don't want to pay.

User_Removed
7 Nov 2012 - 2:12 PM

once is once too often if it's you it happens to. I guess my perspective is a litle biased. I would rather take reasonable precautions and only share what I'm comfortable sharing online for all the world to see than cry after the fact, and that's really all I'm saying - just be aware you aren't just sharing with a select group of friends and family unless you take active steps to protect your privacy and each person must decide for themselves where their comfort level is. Mine, both in real life and online is slightly more private than some without being neurotic about it. I don't lose sleep over what might happen but there are things I just don't do either.

pulsar69
pulsar69  101611 forum posts United Kingdom6 Constructive Critique Points
7 Nov 2012 - 5:20 PM

I think looking at the replies and the likes the consensus of opinion is that this really isn't an issue anyone needs to worry about , better things to do ....

779HOB
779HOB  21020 forum posts United Kingdom
8 Nov 2012 - 6:20 AM


Quote: Some of those targeted adverts attach their advertising to your photos / posts and use it as if it is theirs.

Not if you opt out which you can do very easily.


Quote: Are we being a bit paranoid here?

Very. There was a guy on here a few years ago who had conspiracy theories for the conspiracy theories. I miss him, what was his name?


Quote: I think looking at the replies and the likes the consensus of opinion is that this really isn't an issue anyone needs to worry about , better things to do ....

Yep.

User_Removed
8 Nov 2012 - 7:22 AM

Bugs Bunny you make / repeat some fascinating claims re Facebook.

You talk of a case in New Zealand, where Facebook were taken to court by distressed family members after they sold photos of dead car crash victims to the media.

Some of the people who read that claim here will go on to repeat it as if it's a verified fact. Maybe you just read it in some forum somewhere and made the same mistake. I think it's bull that somebody's made up.

Quote: They have been challenged in court by families of victims (there was one case in NZ where family photos were sold to a newspaper)

Can you show any evidence whatsoever for any of these court challenges?

User_Removed
8 Nov 2012 - 8:53 AM

As I already said it was a while ago, unfortunately I don't keep track of sites, which I keep saying i must do, but don't .... c'est la vie ... and the way I use the web it's very hard to back track and find things again. It wasn't on a forum, it was a newspaper report from a local paper in NZ and it was several years ago.

User_Removed
8 Nov 2012 - 9:08 AM

This however is from February this year:

http://www.news24.com/SciTech/News/Facebook-photos-on-porn-site-20120217

One from Singapore:

http://www.more.com/photo-jacking-facebook

November 2011 FB accounts hacked and profile pictures posted on porn sites:

http://www.ibtimes.com/facebook-accounts-hacked-profile-pics-posted-porn-sites-6-easy-steps-secure-your-account-370630

Posting homemade explicit video / pics ends up on porn sites:

http://washington.cbslocal.com/2012/10/23/study-vast-majority-of-homemade-porn-private-photos-end-up-online/


Quote: The study analyzed more than 12,000 sexually explicit images uploaded by young people and found that the great majority of images had been stolen and published to what the organization calls, “parasite” websites.

These “parasites,” which are exclusively designed for hosting sexual images featuring young subjects, allegedly obtain their material from anywhere they can get it: lost or stolen cellphones, hacked private accounts on Photobucket, Flickr, or Facebook, or from chat sites and Tumblr, a blogging platform notorious for the amount of explicit self-published content by high school and college-age students.

So if you are stupid enough to post explicit content of yourself on the web or via cellphone ... its more than likely to end up on a porn site.


Quote: 26-year-old man faces 13 felony charges after being accused of hacking into Facebook accounts, stealing photos of young women and posting them on porn sites

http://digitallife.today.com/_news/2011/04/22/6513470-facebook-hacker-posts-stolen-pics-on-porn-site?lite

And this is all just with 5 minutes search. It happens more than you want to think.

User_Removed
8 Nov 2012 - 9:11 AM

And the cherry on the top:


Quote: Facebook Is the Final Frontier in Amateur Porn

The internet is no longer sated by poorly-lit shoots and shaky cameras. Amateur porn needs to be even more amateur. The cutting-edge of online smut is stalker porn: private sexy pics posted without their subjects' consent, paired with a screenshot of their Facebook profile.

That's the model that's made IsAnyoneUp.com (NSFW) an increasingly popular destination in online porn, with 30 million pageviews a month. The site features nude pictures of young men and women, along with their real names and their Facebook account. Most of the pictures look like they were meant for private sexts with a lover, not the entire internet, and that's because many of them were.

At The Awl, Danny Gold has a great profile of 25-year-old Hunter Moore, the proprietor of IsAnyoneUp. Moore regularly posts nude pics anonymously submitted by spurned ex-lovers without their subjects' consent. He refuses to take them down, no matter how many anguished emails and legal threats he gets.

"What do I have to defend myself against?," he told the Awl. "It comes down to, you're ******* stupid and I'm making money off your mistakes. It might sound rough, but how else are you going to learn not to do this again? It's like you're playing Russian Roulette like, oh, let's hope this doesn't get out."

There's not much Moore's subjects can do to get their pictures taken down—all the pics are user submitted, so he's protected by the Communications Decency Act of 1996. In fact, attempts to evade IsAnyoneUp's attention seems to get Moore and his fans off even more. When one of IsAnyoneUp's subjects tried to vanish online, Moore put out a "hoember alert" for her:

A Hoember Alert is when someone goes missing on any of the social networks online, this cookie monster has unfortunately gone homeber.She deleted her fb and twitter and everything else, i'm really worried she has a kid or something. if you have any information please contact me at isanyoneup@gmail.com

A few days later, Moore had found and posted the girl's new Facebook profile, no doubt helped by Facebook's draconian real name policy. Moore's like a dark Mark Zuckerberg, exploiting people's openness through smut, not ads.

Stalker porn should make you think twice the next time you sext your significant other. It also requires your Facebook account to be wide open, so lock that down tight. The embarrassment of showing up on IsAnyoneUp must be awful—but that's nothing compared to the fact that your mistake is making people like Hunter Moore rich.

User_Removed
8 Nov 2012 - 9:14 AM

So yeah if you want to have a 'head in the sand / it won't happen to me' approach to this - fine by me, but I'm going to carry on keeping my private stuff off the web.

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