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Shocking and disturbing


StrayCat e2
10 15.5k 2 Canada
9 Jul 2013 9:59PM
I've mentioned this one before; in the US, in an apartment building, there was a woman in the hall who lived in one of the apartments. Another woman opened her apartment door, and her dog got out, attacked her neighbour, killing her. The dog owner was charged and convicted of 2nd degree murder. I'll never forget the look on her face as the verdict was announced.

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Paul Morgan e2
13 16.1k 6 England
9 Jul 2013 10:21PM

Quote:At what point does the owner have responsibility for not properly securing his dog?


The dog was in the car and under normal circumstances that would have been just fine.

That responsibility fell to the police, they saw he had a dog, they would have seen the open car window, they police should have made sure the dog was secured before even attempting to make the arrest.
mikehit e2
5 7.1k 11 United Kingdom
9 Jul 2013 10:42PM
Let's follow this through.
The guy was in a public place and had his dog on a lead as is normal practice. He put the dog in the car where the windows offer no barrier to the dog getting out and he does nothing to secure the dog. The dog is effectively free (like walking it without the lead) - in what way is that 'just fine'? It is not the police's responsibility to make sure the dog is secure. When they arrest someone I am sure that they are not thinking 'is the dog secure' having seen him put it in the car.

The logic of this is that some thug mugs an old lady and the police turn up. He has an aggressive dog and he refuses to tie the dog so the police 'let him go' because they can't arrest him until he does.

This is obviously an irreconcilable difference so I am not sure much else can be said.
Paul Morgan e2
13 16.1k 6 England
9 Jul 2013 11:14PM

Quote:The logic of this is that some thug mugs an old lady and the police turn up. He has an aggressive dog and he refuses to tie the dog so the police 'let him go' because they can't arrest him until he does


You logic is somewhat twisted Smile
mikehit e2
5 7.1k 11 United Kingdom
9 Jul 2013 11:25PM
I have my moments....(mainly 'senior' ones) Wink
thewilliam 6 4.9k
9 Jul 2013 11:27PM

Quote:

The logic of this is that some thug mugs an old lady and the police turn up. He has an aggressive dog and he refuses to tie the dog so the police 'let him go' because they can't arrest him until he does.



Wouldn't this be the correct course of action under Health & Safety law?
mikehit e2
5 7.1k 11 United Kingdom
9 Jul 2013 11:58PM
OO....OOO... sir... I know the answer to this one... it is the fault of those pesky EU brats introducing silly laws and regulations. Let's pull out of the EU...
monstersnowman 9 1.7k 1 England
10 Jul 2013 12:37AM
LOL, Paul Morgan, you are priceless .. I dont think for one second you believe your last few comments lol .. honestly, I really dont. You backed the wrong horse, its dead and youre now flogging it ;o) Its the owners responsibility to secure his dog. You can micro analyse every bit of the police action for some small errors in judgment or perhaps how, in hindsight, things could have gone better BUT they didnt know his dog hadnt been tethered in the car, they didnt know it would come and attack or be able to, just like they dont know if any person they stop is armed and by tackling a man armed with a gun they may have to shoot him, or if he is accompanied by others and by tackling him they will cause others to get involved and escalate the situation ... blah blah blah ... they simply arrested a man who had just put his dog away into the car. Nobody asked the man to pitch up right next to an armed siege with canine units there .. nobody asked him to get too close with a dog and his music blaring out, nobody asked him to continually gob off at officers in a dangerous situation and refuse to leave despite being repeatedly told to do so, nobody asked him to put his dog away but leave it unsecured, nobody asked him to get into a struggle with the police and for him to shout as the dog attacked, thus making his own dog even more aggressive, nobody else owned that dog or caused the scenario apart from the man BUT his dog died in a horrible fashion. Im very sad for the dog and the officer that had to shoot the dog to avoid being mauled by a large aggressive animal but there is only one responsible person here and it isnt anyone in police uniform this time, as much as you may like it to be.
Paul Morgan e2
13 16.1k 6 England
10 Jul 2013 3:41AM
Nah a bad situation all round, bad for the police, bad for the dog owner, bad for the dog.
StrayCat e2
10 15.5k 2 Canada
10 Jul 2013 5:22AM
Isn't it the responsibility of the dog owner to have their dog under control at all times? Here, this also applies to off-leash recreational areas for dogs. Otherwise an out of control dog can attack and injure, or worse, people and other dogs that have just as much right to be there. Does that make sense? Imo, a very high percentage of the problems with dogs, or other pets, rests on the shoulders of irresponsible owners.
answersonapostcard e2
10 12.7k 15 United Kingdom
10 Jul 2013 7:57AM
Logic should suggest that the dog owner should not have put his dog in that position, If I was a conspiracy theorist I could argue that the man knew exactly what he was doing - probably didnt expect the outcome though - or did he?

I feel sorry for the dog, but it was not the policemans fault, dog owner should have got back in his car and gone somewhere else to walk his dog if thats what he was his actual intention for that half hour, doesnt look like it to me though. I'm not surprised its gone viral with the spin thats been put on it.
Paul Morgan e2
13 16.1k 6 England
10 Jul 2013 4:34PM
Who knows, maybe he hadn`t realised he was about to be arrested, it would be just a quick chat and he would be on his way.

Both the police and the dog owner handled the situation badly.
keithh e2
11 23.4k 33 Wallis And Futuna
10 Jul 2013 5:12PM
Trust me - he knew and wanted confrontation from the moment he got out of the Car. The body language and his actions were classic.
monstersnowman 9 1.7k 1 England
11 Jul 2013 3:00AM
[Quote]Both the police and the dog owner handled the situation badly.


No they didn't both handle the situation badly.

Every bit of the man's actions suggested he expected and encouraged conflict and took this situation to the police and the siege unnecessarily. He made a catalogue of numerous bad decisions that precipitated the terrible outcome. The only thing the police didnt do was minutely and accurately analyse, at the brief window of opportunity, every possible outcome, which is an unrealistic expectation for even the most highly trained person. Sadly for everyone the idiot's efforts resulted in a tragic outcome and despite however many numerous, ridiculous, bad decisions he made along his timeline toward the incident, people will micro-analyse the incident to find one single thing the police could have done differently with the benefit of hindsight and pin this on the police as their fault or try to share blame. Thankfully enough people here can see who was at fault.

Unfortunately nobody wins as it is negative press for the police, a police officer has to deal with the trauma of shooting a dog at close range after being attacked, a man is arrested, a dog loses its life, and a dangerous situation is interfered with at the risk of further injury or loss of life ..... All because of a stupid man.
ventile 7 152 Wales
14 Jul 2013 10:03PM
Sad for the dog,dont care about the other two clowns...Especially the copper..

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