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Shooting Candles and a Model in a studio

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Taya
Taya  8 United Kingdom
23 Jan 2009 - 1:26 PM

I'm not sure if this is the right area, but I am trying to figure out how I would light my model without killing the candle ambeint/light. I would prefer to use studio flash.

I have read that it's ideal to superimpose images, by firstly taking a pic of the candle with the correct exposure and then with the model.

I was thinking of using barn doors, snoots and honey combs directed at the model's face.

Also I will be using a black background which I will be lighting.

Hope someone can help.

Many thanks in advnace Smile
Taya

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23 Jan 2009 - 1:26 PM

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yellowduke
23 Jan 2009 - 2:35 PM

Not a lighting expert by any means but if the candle has no role in illuminating the model then I think your plan to use very directional light would work. There will be an obvious difference in colour temperature though which might require some post processing to balance out unless it adds to the effect, or you are going to convert to B & W.

FatHandedChap
23 Jan 2009 - 2:44 PM

You can light the model using snoots etc as you suggest and set your aperture accordingly. You would need to use the shutter speed to record the ambient light from the candle which will be alot slower than your flash sync. This is not a problem with static subjects, but you would need your model to sit very still for the whole exposure.

Tony

Last Modified By FatHandedChap at 23 Jan 2009 - 2:44 PM
Taya
Taya  8 United Kingdom
23 Jan 2009 - 2:44 PM


Quote: Not a lighting expert by any means but if the candle has no role in illuminating the model then I think your plan to use very directional light would work. There will be an obvious difference in colour temperature though which might require some post processing to balance out unless it adds to the effect, or you are going to convert to B & W.

That's true, I won't be using them to illuminate the model, (maye be for a few shots) and I won't be converting them to BW. However I worry that the flash maybe blow out the flame effect on the candles.

Thanks Smile

Taya
Taya  8 United Kingdom
23 Jan 2009 - 2:53 PM

Hi Fathandedchap,
Thanks for the help Smile

I did think about the shutter speed opotion and selecting a flash power of f/2.8.

Hope my model can sit still and I can adapt to using a tripod!

It seems so complicated!
Smile

yellowduke
23 Jan 2009 - 3:07 PM


Quote: Quote:Not a lighting expert by any means but if the candle has no role in illuminating the model then I think your plan to use very directional light would work. There will be an obvious difference in colour temperature though which might require some post processing to balance out unless it adds to the effect, or you are going to convert to B & W.That's true, I won't be using them to illuminate the model, (maye be for a few shots) and I won't be converting them to BW. However I worry that the flash maybe blow out the flame effect on the candles.

Thanks

I think trial and error will be called for but make a note of the details of the shots that work, shutter speed, ISO, aperture and flash power settings. When I shoot with lights I tend to set the camera once and alter the light to get the exposure I want. In your case I think some fiddling with everything will be needed. A longer exposure will bring the candle light more into play but the model will have to stay still or your set be so dark that they are invisible to your camera without the flash. Sounds like an interesting little project.

BubbaG2000
23 Jan 2009 - 3:31 PM


Quote: but the model will have to stay still or your set be so dark that they are invisible to your camera without the flash. Sounds like an interesting little project.

Agreed. If the set is dark and lit purely by the flash, then you wont get any blur from model movement. And yes, an interesting project. Please post what you get!!

FatHandedChap
23 Jan 2009 - 3:59 PM


Quote: When I shoot with lights I tend to set the camera once and alter the light to get the exposure I want.

Choose your aperture first to suit your subject then adjust your lights accordingly - you may find that f2.8 gives too shallow depth of field. As long as your model isn't holding the candles and the flash is well masked then you shouldn't have too much of a problem.

If you have a light meter then you can take a flash reading to get your aperture, then take an ambient reading to get your shutter speed - it will save loads of messing about in the long run.

Garry_Edwards
23 Jan 2009 - 5:01 PM

I very rarely post in this forum but here goes...

This is 'as is' with no computer work other than desaturating the image.

The candles were arranged around a smoked glass table top.

The beam of light was from a standard reflector on a flash head

The diffraction filter was rotated to channel the light from the modelling lamp, in other words to produce controlled flare.
[img]http://www.photolearn.co.uk/beam.jpg[/img]
From memory, the exposure was 2 secs @ f/11, 100 ISO

User_Removed
23 Jan 2009 - 5:03 PM

Put it in your PF Garry Smile

Garry_Edwards
23 Jan 2009 - 5:08 PM

I did have it in there at one time but it didn't seem to attract much interest, unlike the very badly lit T&B shots that seem to attract so much praise...
I ended up deleting the whole portfolio

User_Removed
23 Jan 2009 - 5:12 PM

Shame Garry. I know it can be frustrating but to be honest, an awful lot of people see and admire photographs without leaving comments or votes - it's just what they do. It's much like visitors to a gallery Smile

If you uploaded photos with information like you have just given or perhaps even wrote a small article for ePz, it would be very popular Smile

Garry_Edwards
23 Jan 2009 - 5:28 PM

Barrie, it's just not going to happen on this forum. I'm active on a few forums, some of which I administer, and used to be active on this one but got a bit sick of my posts being edited and of being accused of spamming when all I was trying to do was to point people to genuinely helpful info or provide honest answers to questions about either technique or equipment.
I appreciate that this is very much a commercial site and that the admins may feel a need to 'protect' members from seeing info on 'competitive' sites and to support the members who advertise on this site, but that isn't an environment that suits me.
I still read posts occasionally and may still offer up the occasional answer, but if I do I'll steer clear of breaking the rules that stop my posts being helpful.

User_Removed
23 Jan 2009 - 5:31 PM

As I say Garry, I understand the frustration

As you point out, it is a commercial site so it's very difficult to get that balance right when some companies are paying for placement (including those offering services not just products) and they then see other companies, organisations or service providers being effectively advertised for free Smile

Last Modified By User_Removed at 23 Jan 2009 - 5:36 PM
mad-dogs
mad-dogs  112201 forum posts England
23 Jan 2009 - 7:59 PM

Try using an orange gel over a flash as a fill light to reduce the contrast.

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