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Should a murderer get a whole-life sentence?


richmowil e2
5 279 1 England
9 Jul 2013 10:47PM

Quote:What the hell has this got to do with photography?!


Not a lot!!

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Newdevonian 2 452 United Kingdom
9 Jul 2013 10:49PM

Quote:What the hell has this got to do with photography?!


Regard it as a snapshot into this weird system we live in.
answersonapostcard e2
10 12.7k 15 United Kingdom
9 Jul 2013 10:50PM
Its in 'Healthy Debate' so other topics other than photography are quite ok. Grin
Paul Morgan e2
13 16.1k 6 England
9 Jul 2013 11:18PM

Quote:Should a potential victim's human rights be considered when a killer, known to be dangerous, is released?


Known to be dangerous when convicted or known to be dangerous when released, there is a difference.
thewilliam 6 4.8k
9 Jul 2013 11:23PM
In the USA, they sometimes give 999 year prison sentences. This is very sensible because the offender will be eligible for parole when 10% of the sentence has been served.

Could a UK judge now impose a 99 year tariff? This will give the required "hope of release!
thewilliam 6 4.8k
9 Jul 2013 11:24PM

Quote:Its in 'Healthy Debate' so other topics other than photography are quite ok. Grin


I thought this was the right topic for an argument and it's been quiet for too long!
Paul Morgan e2
13 16.1k 6 England
9 Jul 2013 11:28PM

Quote:In the USA, they sometimes give 999 year prison sentences. This is very sensible because the offender will be eligible for parole when 10% of the sentence has been served


Anyone see the Trevor Mcdonald series on American Prisons Smile
cathal 10 492 4 Ireland
9 Jul 2013 11:51PM
The EU and the ECHR are not the same thing, as has been posted already. However, membership of the EU now requires the member state to sign up to the ECHR.

This ruling though, really is an argument about semantics. Previously, a whole life tariff couldn't be reviewed. Now, if the government accepts the ruling, it can be. Review doesn't mean change, (as people with annual salary reviews will tell you!) and I would doubt if any of those incarcerated under a whole life tariff will see any difference in their treatment or sentencing.

As has been said earlier... storm in a teacup!
llareggub 4 756 United Kingdom
10 Jul 2013 6:43AM
Absolute storm in a teacup that means nothing other than a procedural difference in the way that sentences are administrated!

The one thing that I feel very strongly about is the influence of victims in the legal process, I believe there is no room for it in any way shape or form... I believe law should be objective and above petty 'restorative justive' and as far as I am concerned the length of a jail sentence should reflect the risk an offender presents to the public, where as most victims want the perpetrator of ay crime to 'go down' forever.
lemmy 7 2.0k United Kingdom
10 Jul 2013 7:40AM

Quote: the length of a jail sentence should reflect the risk an offender presents to the public


Administration of justice has always incorporated an element of punishment as well as protective custody, which I understand that your point of view would reject.

But in many cases the perpetrator of a crime is and never was a danger to the public. For example, a man murders his wife for infidelity. He is himself shocked and sorry for what he has done. He represents no danger to the public at large and since his wife is dead, he can be no further danger to her. There have been many cases where the judges have acknowledged these factors.

In your system would this man walk free? He poses no danger to the public and never did, so only a lack of jail would reflect his risk to the public (that is, none).

While I understand that point of view, it rests uneasily that such a man will be punished by a fine or community service in the same way as a shoplifter or a careless driver.
lemmy 7 2.0k United Kingdom
10 Jul 2013 7:52AM

Quote:What the hell has this got to do with photography?!


gingerdougie, I don't understand that remark. What does this forum's title 'General - For Off Topic Discussions/Healthy Debate' mean to you? If you are in doubt, see below from the Read First! Announcement thread from ePZ staff memeber David Burleson at the head of this forum

>
Welcome to the Healthy Debate forum on ePHOTOzine.

This forum is intended to be used for discussion of current affairs and non photography issues.
<
mikehit e2
5 7.1k 11 United Kingdom
10 Jul 2013 7:54AM
He should be jailed, certainly. But in all cases of murder (including the example you quoted) he still has a life sentence but is released 'on license'. This means he can be recalled to prison at any time in his life and for any reason whatsoever, though in practice it is usually done if he commits another crime. This is what happened with the highly publicised ohn Venables case.
A lot of judges are uncomfortable with the idea that a 'crime of passion' such as this should get an automatic life sentence, and there are calls for 'grades' of murder as there are in the US.
llareggub 4 756 United Kingdom
10 Jul 2013 8:07AM

Quote:the length of a jail sentence should reflect the risk an offender presents to the public

Administration of justice has always incorporated an element of punishment as well as protective custody, which I understand that your point of view would reject.

But in many cases the perpetrator of a crime is and never was a danger to the public. For example, a man murders his wife for infidelity. He is himself shocked and sorry for what he has done. He represents no danger to the public at large and since his wife is dead, he can be no further danger to her. There have been many cases where the judges have acknowledged these factors.

In your system would this man walk free? He poses no danger to the public and never did, so only a lack of jail would reflect his risk to the public (that is, none).

While I understand that point of view, it rests uneasily that such a man will be punished by a fine or community service in the same way as a shoplifter or a careless driver.



Largely I have little problem with that in principle however the example is a little off the mark, I would personally argue that a man who murders his wife as a result of infidelity is most definitely a risk to the public... It is an act of barbarism that by far exceeds an 'expected' reaction to an act that, whilst distasteful, is a fact of human existence and always will be!

She slept with someone else, he pranged my car, she cut me up at the lights, he looked at my pint are all instances where violence is an over reaction to the situation and as such an act of violence says a great deal about the person committing the act of violence.

That is how I would view it.
kodachrome 3 530
10 Jul 2013 8:44AM
Quite so, in retrospect I don't think it was a good idea to raise this subject on a photographic forum. Admin should have edited this.
llareggub 4 756 United Kingdom
10 Jul 2013 8:50AM

Quote:Quite so, in retrospect I don't think it was a good idea to raise this subject on a photographic forum. Admin should have edited this.


Why it is in the healthy debate, 'miscellaneous' section of the website and any discussions have been respectful and in a tone that does nothing to damage the reputation of the website???

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