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Silly laws


213hardy e2
6 643 England
9 Apr 2012 9:01PM
Thought i'd heard somewhere it was legal to shoot a Scotman with a bow and arrow in york, just checked and have found this little lot.

• Under the reign of Elizabeth I, any person found guilty of "harboring a Catholic priest" would be tortured or even hanged. Any priest of the Catholic faith that was caught would be hanged, drawn, and quartered.
• It is illegal to be drunk on Licensed Premises (in a pub or bar).
• Any person found breaking a boiled egg at the sharp end will be sentenced to 24 hours in the village stocks (enacted by Edward VI).
• Mince pies can not be eaten on Christmas day. (Explanation: Ingredients of mince pies and plum puddings were pagan in origin, and their consumption part of ancient fertility rituals. The law dates from the Puritan era, the same time that dancing in church, maypoles, and holly and ivy decorations were outlawed. The laws were never officially repealed because upon the restoration of the monarchy, (in the form of Charles II) all laws formed under the protectorate were ignored as invalid.)
• The keeper of the Tower of London can levy a charge of sixpence on each English pilgrim visiting Compostela
• Placing a postage stamp that bears the Queen (or King) upside down is considered treason.
• In Chester, you can only shoot a Welsh person with a bow and arrow inside the city walls and after midnight.
• You may not shoot a Welsh person on Sunday with a longbow in the Cathedral Close in Hereford.
• In Liverpool, it is illegal for a woman to be topless in public except as a clerk in a tropical fish store.
• In York, excluding Sundays, it is perfectly legal to shoot a Scotsman with a bow and arrow.

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meercat e2
5 278 United Kingdom
9 Apr 2012 9:20PM

Quote:
• Any person found breaking a boiled egg at the sharp end will be sentenced to 24 hours in the village stocks (enacted by Edward VI).



I'm trying to think of ANY reason this could possibly have become law, I mean seriously WTF????
Jestertheclown
6 6.6k 242 England
9 Apr 2012 9:42PM

Quote:• It is illegal to be drunk on Licensed Premises (in a pub or bar).

That's not a million miles from the truth today.
It's not exactly the same, but it's illegal to serve someone in a pub or bar if their already drunk.
Even if you sold them the drink that they got drunk on in the first place!
keith selmes
11 7.1k 1 United Kingdom
9 Apr 2012 11:22PM
Most of those weird laws seem not to be true, but apparently it is true that all whales caught or found in the UK belong to the Queen, and that wearing armour in Parliament is not allowed.

http://www.dracos.co.uk/scribblings/absurd-laws/


and some things you musn't do in the street

don't hang out your laundry
Under the Town Police Clauses Act 1847 it is an offence, punishable by a £1,000 fine or 14 days in prison, to air even clean laundry in public.

and

You cannot sing “any profane or obscene song or Ballard” nor use “profane or obscene language”.
You cannot ring any doorbell so as to “wilfully and wantonly disturb any inhabitant”.
You cannot fly a kite in the street.
You cannot shake or beat any carpet rug or mat, except door mats, which must be beaten or shaken before 08:00am only

( http://www.morrlaw.com/news/uk-s-strangest-laws-fact-or-fiction )
darranl e2
5 318 England
10 Apr 2012 11:48AM

Quote:It's not exactly the same, but it's illegal to serve someone in a pub or bar if their already drunk.


I wonder why that law seems to be seldom used. We have regular coverage of how bad binge drinking is or trouble in city centers at closing time but surely for everyone involved it was not the last drink they had that tipped them over from not being drunk to being drunk.
Carabosse e2
11 39.7k 269 England
10 Apr 2012 12:16PM
Many younger people, in the UK, seem to think it is pretty much compulsory to get drunk when you go out to the pub... and the pubs don't seem to discourage this.
Jestertheclown
6 6.6k 242 England
10 Apr 2012 1:09PM

Quote:I wonder why that law seems to be seldom used.

It's to do with money, I guess. Many pubs will serve anyone, in any state, just for the revenue it generates.

As an aside and speaking of obscure laws, there are four categories of people that you must not serve on licensed premises and when you apply for a liquor licence, the magisatrates will expect you to know them all.
People who have had too much already constitute one.
Does anyone know what the other three are?
darranl e2
5 318 England
10 Apr 2012 1:16PM

Quote:It's to do with money, I guess. Many pubs will serve anyone, in any state, just for the revenue it generates.


Yeah I know why the businesses continue to sell it but was more wondering why the actual law is not enforced.

The other two I know of are police officers and those under 18 but not sure about a fourth.
10 Apr 2012 1:20PM
I think another was a police officer in uniform. Due to the recent change in licensing law, it was taken out of the hands of Magistrates' Courts, and handed over to local councils. Yes, and another was a person under 18 yrs of age. Although there were exceptions to that in respect of where under 18s were present at licensed premises, and were in a party having a meal; but again there was a further age restriction. The laws re drunkeness still apply.-
simple drunk; drunk and disorderly; drunk and incapable. However, one force in the UK sends a drunk home by taxi rather than inconvenience themselves with having to lock him up, and send them on to court.
Jestertheclown
6 6.6k 242 England
10 Apr 2012 1:32PM
A police officer in uniform is one.
Anyone that you consider to be under eighteen, although as you say, the family party/meal loophole allowed sixteen year olds to be served, still at your discretion.
The fourth and least well know, is that you must not serve a known prostitute.
I'm not entirely sure how you'd be expected to know though!
It's been a while since I worked in the licenced trade but I'm not aware that anything's changed.
11 Apr 2012 2:23PM
Been talking to an ex-publican this morning. Party/meal loophole, and there was also the 'supper hour' extension where people were having a meal and they could be sold alcoholic drinks in the hour extension. But that was blatantly ignored. At closing time persons would enter the meal area sit down at a table, then used dining plates were put in front of them. They would then buy drinks, and if the law came in, they 'had just finished a meal.'
Jestertheclown
6 6.6k 242 England
11 Apr 2012 2:49PM
I've never used that ploy myself but I once worked in a pub which had a separate dining area in which a table was always kept laid. The landlord reckoned that that was adequate should the police ever have looked in after closing time and everyone was still drinking.
19 Apr 2012 12:24PM
Another under the Town Police Clauses Act, was people had to clear snow from outside their premises. I do not know if it is still in force, but during the past winter, someone was clearing the snow from the footpath outside their house, or whatever, and Health and Safety told him not to do so, as it could be dangerous for passers-by !!!!!!! I cannot follow that logic.
keith selmes
11 7.1k 1 United Kingdom
19 Apr 2012 1:04PM

Quote:clearing the snow from the footpath outside their house, or whatever, and Health and Safety told him not to do so, as it could be dangerous for passers-by
There has been at least one case where a shopkeeper cleared the pavement using warm water, which then froze into a thin sheet of clear ice, causing an injury. That had a lot of publicity, but various authorities last year were trying to counteract that, and encouraging people to clear snow, just so long as they don't make it worse.
19 Apr 2012 4:00PM

Quote:The fourth and least well know, is that you must not serve a known prostitute


I suppose it could be argued that you would be living off the earnings of prostitution - in part.

Also, you could be accused of running a house where they can meet/pick up clients i.e. a "disorderly house".

Probably the deterrent effect was the real reason.

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