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Software to swap the C: drive on my PC?

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MikeA
MikeA  91175 forum posts England
20 Aug 2012 - 9:27 PM

My 4yr old C: drive is 80% full, what software is available / recommended to transfer the content of my current disc to a new, larger disc that would boot in place of the old one when swapped into the system please.

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20 Aug 2012 - 9:27 PM

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MeanGreeny
20 Aug 2012 - 9:59 PM

Acronis True Image Home [40] is excellent and I use it monthly as a boot drive backup

..........or try the freeware ones here:

Snapfiles' Choice of Disk Cloning Freeware

Tried cleaning out the TEMP files and all the other crap that is lurking there? You might be surprised at what you recover...........

Last Modified By MeanGreeny at 20 Aug 2012 - 10:00 PM Helpful Post! This post was flagged as helpful
MikeA
MikeA  91175 forum posts England
20 Aug 2012 - 10:12 PM


Quote:

Tried cleaning out the TEMP files and all the other crap that is lurking there? You might be surprised at what you recover...........

Hi, Thanks for the software info. I clean c: drive daily so no mileage there I am afraid.

MikeA.

redsnappa
redsnappa  121916 forum posts United Kingdom
21 Aug 2012 - 6:51 AM

Another vote for Acronis True Imaging.
I had need to use it yesterday when my wife got her laptop infected with loads of viruses. I restored her laptop from a recent backup image & she was back up and running within 20 minutes.

thewilliam
21 Aug 2012 - 9:47 AM

Have you thought of fitting the new drive(s) to hold your data? It's good practice to keep system and data on different spindles.

Helpful Post! This post was flagged as helpful
Carrera_c
Carrera_c  5256 forum posts United Kingdom3 Constructive Critique Points
21 Aug 2012 - 12:01 PM

+1 for thewilliam's point. It's good practice to have your C: just holding all the system files (Operating System, installed programs, etc) and have a separate drive(s) for actually storing your content (photos, video, mp3, whatever).

This has a lot of advantages, there's a slight performance boost because you're helping to optimise the disk i/o a bit. It's easier to backup as you only really need to backup your files and not the system files so you can just target your second drive.

MikeA
MikeA  91175 forum posts England
21 Aug 2012 - 12:03 PM


Quote: Have you thought of fitting the new drive(s) to hold your data? It's good practice to keep system and data on different spindles.

Thanks for the tip but I have no "data" on my C: drive it is held on two internal 2Tb drives with a 300Gb scratch disc + 5Tb of external drives.

My interest is in swapping out the current 300Gb for something larger without the hassle of re-installing, good house keeping is something I already practice Smile)

Last Modified By MikeA at 21 Aug 2012 - 12:07 PM
thewilliam
21 Aug 2012 - 6:21 PM

A few months back, I tried to use Norton Ghost to copy the C drive to another spindle because I'd been ignoring the smart failure warnings for too long. All seemed well until I removed the original C and tried to boot up from the new "system" drive. Even though I'd pointed to the new drive in setup, it wouldn't work and I had to re-load everything. We all know what a pain that can be!

Helpful Post! This post was flagged as helpful
MikeA
MikeA  91175 forum posts England
21 Aug 2012 - 6:37 PM


Quote: A few months back, I tried to use Norton Ghost to copy the C drive to another spindle because I'd been ignoring the smart failure warnings for too long. All seemed well until I removed the original C and tried to boot up from the new "system" drive. Even though I'd pointed to the new drive in setup, it wouldn't work and I had to re-load everything. We all know what a pain that can be!

Thanks for the info. that pain is what I am trying to avoid if possible, if it isn't then I might as well bite the bullet and look for a new system probably with 8 or 12 cores to replace the Quad Xeon I currently run.

theorderingone
21 Aug 2012 - 7:28 PM

I've used Macrium Reflect Free to make an image of my laptop hard drive to copy to ssd, which is basically the same job as you're looking at, with no issues.

I put a guide through the process on my blog.

Hope this helps.

Helpful Post! This post was flagged as helpful
MikeA
MikeA  91175 forum posts England
21 Aug 2012 - 7:43 PM


Quote: I've used Macrium Reflect Free to make an image of my laptop hard drive to copy to ssd, which is basically the same job as you're looking at, with no issues.

I put a guide through the process on my blog.

Hope this helps.

Hi, Thank you I will check through your blog later.

MikeA.

theorderingone
21 Aug 2012 - 7:59 PM

No Problem. Just substitute the SSD with your larger hard drive and the process is the same.

If you're comfortable connecting the new drive up with a Sata cable, rather than a USB caddy, the process will be much quicker too. Smile

MikeA
MikeA  91175 forum posts England
22 Aug 2012 - 10:37 AM


Quote: No Problem. Just substitute the SSD with your larger hard drive and the process is the same.

If you're comfortable connecting the new drive up with a Sata cable, rather than a USB caddy, the process will be much quicker too. Smile

A good guide to follow, might even update my laptop as well Wink) I was going to temporarily substitute a new drive unit for one of my existing discs and update to that.

theorderingone
22 Aug 2012 - 12:13 PM

I'm glad it's helpful Smile

MikeA
MikeA  91175 forum posts England
28 Aug 2012 - 7:51 PM


Quote: I'm glad it's helpful Smile

Just updated the laptop with a Crucial 520Gb SSD - came with cloning software "Ez Gig 3" and cable. It took about an hour and half to clone the hard drive to the SSD. Swapped over the drives in the laptop, booted and away to go.
The software partitioned the drive as per the original, C: and D:, with all software working fine but much faster, especially when loading files / data. One programme Dragonframe seemed to load its 500 images from the last usage as the programme loaded whereas before the programme loaded then the files slowly loaded. Very impressed. Next is my Workstation, the original computer I was interested in updating Smile)

Last Modified By MikeA at 28 Aug 2012 - 7:52 PM

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