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User_Removed
25 Oct 2012 - 7:26 PM


Quote:
On a 24-70, there would obviously be a big difference in horizontal and vertical at the wider end, and rotating the body would therefore effect the image and any distortion.

That's garbage, Paul.

As a user of the D800 and a Nikkor 24-70mm f/2.8 lens myself, I can confirm that the lens is sharp right to the edges on any orientation. And, of course, when cropping a portrait format from a landscape image, you are not going anywhere near the edges of the lens projection. Wakey Wakey!! If you were worried about lack of sharpness of distortion at the edges, then the suggested cropping technique would be exactly the way to go.

I think that one of the reasons given for shooting everything landscape and then cropping to portrait if desired was specifically to avoid the extra bulk, weight and hassle of adding a battery grip. A Landscape Raw image on the D800, cropped to portrait, still has better resolution than a full-frame portrait image from a D700 and I suspect that, for the type of work he did, that resolution was more than adequate. However, as always, horses for courses.

Last Modified By User_Removed at 25 Oct 2012 - 7:29 PM
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25 Oct 2012 - 7:26 PM

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paulcookphotography

I think you misunderstand what i was referring to. I was not commenting on any softness at the edges, but how the image distorts at wider angles, which, in a landscape view would be on the left and right, and on a portrait view would be top and bottom (hence the differences seen), I use the same lens myself, so i am familiar with its performance and wide angle characteristics.

However, the point i was making was spending money on a camera higher with spec sensor, only to crop down images later due to not composing the images while shooting seems a little bit strange. Composing images as you shoot saves time, and you are much more likely to get results if you know what you are aiming for there and then. Perhaps it is becoming a regular practice, but i would have expected a professional to be working in a much different way.

Are we all looking forward to massively superior sensors in the future where we no longer have to worry about focal length and instead just stand far enough back and crop later?

As far as cropping the edges due to distortion, well, i would pass on a hint and tell your friend not to shoot wide angle on portraits unless they WANT the distorted effect (although unlikely for most wedding shoots). Lenses (like cameras) fit well with certain aspects of photography and not others

Last Modified By paulcookphotography at 25 Oct 2012 - 7:54 PM
Graysta
Graysta  91134 forum posts England
25 Oct 2012 - 7:58 PM

As the OP posted as sqare farmat, why does the D800 owner not switch to square format in camera?

Last Modified By Graysta at 25 Oct 2012 - 7:58 PM
Sooty_1
Sooty_1 Critique Team 41195 forum posts United Kingdom196 Constructive Critique Points
25 Oct 2012 - 8:01 PM

I would suspect that is exactly what we're waiting for! If the picture was square, with a good quality sensor you could crop to whatever aspect you want without rotating the camera. Some cameras get round it by rotating the back so you don't have to turn the camera on its side.
With a camera of 30MP, you can afford to crop 2/3 of the frame and still have more than enough for a decent enlargement.

With a 24 on full frame, there isn't much distortion at normal ranges, only increasing as you get closer, plus there is more into the corners than along the middle of the edges. Again, with that much MPage you can afford to crop looser and adjust later.

Nick

paulcookphotography

lol, well thats just gonna fall into the Photoshop haters laps.

Good photography is no longer about composition. Shoot now, think later

A bit of cropping here or there is one thing, but investing in a higher spec camera so you can lose a third (at least) of an image for 'convenience' is crazy in my view

Snapper
Snapper  93731 forum posts United States Minor Outlying Islands3 Constructive Critique Points
25 Oct 2012 - 9:13 PM

There was an article in B&W Photography magazine recently where Tim Clinch pointed out that Lightroom has a number of presets for photos and that he had been using 5x4 as it just had that certain something. Worth a try?

cats_123
cats_123 e2 Member 104009 forum postscats_123 vcard Northern Ireland25 Constructive Critique Points
25 Oct 2012 - 10:02 PM


Quote: There was an article in B&W Photography magazine recently where Tim Clinch pointed out that Lightroom has a number of presets for photos and that he had been using 5x4 as it just had that certain something. Worth a try?

if anyone has the link to that preset I would be interested in giving it a try Smile

Just Jas
Just Jas  1225751 forum posts England1 Constructive Critique Points
25 Oct 2012 - 10:10 PM


Quote: But it wouldn't produce a sharp edge such as this surely?

Also the fall-off in light intensity would be noticeable moving towards the edge of the image.

Snapper
Snapper  93731 forum posts United States Minor Outlying Islands3 Constructive Critique Points
25 Oct 2012 - 10:56 PM


Quote: There was an article in B&W Photography magazine recently where Tim Clinch pointed out that Lightroom has a number of presets for photos and that he had been using 5x4 as it just had that certain something. Worth a try?if anyone has the link to that preset I would be interested in giving it a try Smile

Open photo in Lightroom and hit "R" to bring up the crop tool. In the top right corner side section there's a little padlock that keeps your aspect ratio the same when locked, or lets you crop where you want when it's unlocked. Just to the left of the padlock you click on the word "Original" and a dropdown box appears offering you a variety of size options. You can choose any of the ratios and that will put a crop of the exact proportions on your image. By keeping the aspect ratio locked you can then alter your crop and keep the 5x4 proportions or whichever one you chose.

RogBrown
RogBrown  73001 forum posts England10 Constructive Critique Points
25 Oct 2012 - 11:00 PM


Quote: But it wouldn't produce a sharp edge such as this surely?

Also the fall-off in light intensity would be noticeable moving towards the edge of the image.

Quite so Jas.

cats_123
cats_123 e2 Member 104009 forum postscats_123 vcard Northern Ireland25 Constructive Critique Points
26 Oct 2012 - 8:47 AM


Quote: There was an article in B&W Photography magazine recently where Tim Clinch pointed out that Lightroom has a number of presets for photos and that he had been using 5x4 as it just had that certain something. Worth a try?if anyone has the link to that preset I would be interested in giving it a try Smile

Open photo in Lightroom and hit "R" to bring up the crop tool. In the top right corner side section there's a little padlock that keeps your aspect ratio the same when locked, or lets you crop where you want when it's unlocked. Just to the left of the padlock you click on the word "Original" and a dropdown box appears offering you a variety of size options. You can choose any of the ratios and that will put a crop of the exact proportions on your image. By keeping the aspect ratio locked you can then alter your crop and keep the 5x4 proportions or whichever one you chose.

many thanks SmileSmile

LenShepherd
LenShepherd e2 Member 62450 forum postsLenShepherd vcard United Kingdom
26 Oct 2012 - 9:53 AM


Quote:
One of the huge benefits he says he gets from the 36Mp sensor is that he no longer needs to change the orientation of his camera between "Landscape" and "Portrait" when shooting. He finds it far easier now to simply shoot every photograph holding the camera in "Landscape" position and simply crop to portrait format if that is what he wants for a particular print.


One of the interesting things about the new high MP cameras is they open up new ways of taken photographs.
If you subscribe to the view 12 MP is usually enough for a good quality A3 print, as I do, then 36 MP shot with 24 MP square in mind and cropped to about 20 MP for a 5:4 format portrait is enough for much wedding work.
A relative weakness of Nikon 51 and 39 AF point bodies is there are no cross type sensors in the 2 outer AF blocks - sometimes a relative portrait photo weakness with the camera in portrait position. Holding the camera in landscape position for portraits puts puts more effective cross type sensors in the region of the subjects eyes.
A lesser issue is the relative poor corner performance at the wide end of lenses like a 24-70 f2.8 when used wide open when working to high standards show in 12 MP images, and more so in 36 MP images using the standard 3:2 format. Some of the corner issues are avoided opting for the D800 5:4 crop option, and all should be avoided cropping the way that is being suggested.
I am not sure about a square format option. On the one hand it reduces file sizes which is sometimes useful, and on the other hand it requires dumping more MP to print 5:4 or 3:2.
The group shots are usually taken in landscape position. If some-one orders a crop of 1 person in a group shot, the more MP there are to start from the better.

photofrenzy
1 Nov 2012 - 12:17 AM

Nikon have the 5:4 format on some of thier full frame cameras such as the D3/ D4/D800 which is nearly a square crop. Its actualy formatted to give you a perfect 10x8 crop, Ideal for wedding photography.

Paul Morgan
Paul Morgan e2 Member 1315157 forum postsPaul Morgan vcard England6 Constructive Critique Points
1 Nov 2012 - 12:39 AM

If think must dslr`s these days offer a square format amongst others.

Carabosse
Carabosse e2 Member 1139395 forum postsCarabosse vcard England269 Constructive Critique Points
1 Nov 2012 - 12:44 AM

The Olympus OM-D certainly offers square format. Not bothered trying it yet.

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