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nickyv32
nickyv32 e2 Member 6135 forum postsnickyv32 vcard England
3 Jun 2008 - 1:07 PM

Beware all. I thought it would never happen to me, I have had my Identity stolen and hundreds of pounds worth of stuff purchased with my Credit card over the weekend.....Check you statements. Quickly........They informed me that is manic at the moment so Beware !!!!!

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conrad
conrad e2 Member 910870 forum postsconrad vcard 116 Constructive Critique Points
3 Jun 2008 - 1:14 PM

So - any idea how they got your credit card info?

bangalicious
3 Jun 2008 - 1:14 PM

Thank you for the advice.

Another reason why i dont have a credit card.

Is the credit card company dealing with this?

nickyv32
nickyv32 e2 Member 6135 forum postsnickyv32 vcard England
3 Jun 2008 - 1:24 PM

The items purchased are still coming through on my statement so I have to ring the bank each time one appears......
I purchased some prints online from Snapfish, I hope this isn't where it was stolen from, but who knows.....
The bank are refunding the money as they come through.....Cheek of it was someone bought a mobile phone for over 100 and then had the nerve to top it up with O2 for 50.....

Last Modified By nickyv32 at 3 Jun 2008 - 1:24 PM
Carabosse
Carabosse e2 Member 1139368 forum postsCarabosse vcard England269 Constructive Critique Points
3 Jun 2008 - 1:30 PM

I'm not too worried about using my credit card, but I do avoid using my debit card for anything other than cash withdrawals.

With a credit card there is at least a "breathing space" between getting a statement which you can check before it is paid - and challenge... I have done this successfully in the past.

With a debit card the money is taken from your bank, usually before you have the slightest chance of stopping it.

Coleslaw
Coleslaw e2 Member 813402 forum postsColeslaw vcard Wales28 Constructive Critique Points
3 Jun 2008 - 1:35 PM

My friend just told me someone called forever21bp.com took 200+ from his bank account.
Can't even find that in google.
Sad

Geraint
Geraint  7715 forum posts Wales34 Constructive Critique Points
3 Jun 2008 - 1:39 PM

Credit card all the time for me. I've been defrauded twice (online purchases both cases - and only reputable companies), and on both occasions the bank dealt with the situation and I was not out of pocket. If I'd used a debit card the money defrauded would have been 'my' money, rather than the bank's money on credit; it would probably have been a nightmare for me to try and claim that money back. Credit cards offer you much more protection than debit cards. I, like Carabosse, only use my debit card for cash withdrawals. Though there's no guarantee of safety with this either!

Michelle_S
3 Jun 2008 - 1:39 PM

Sorry to hear that Nicky and Col Sad

Carabosse
Carabosse e2 Member 1139368 forum postsCarabosse vcard England269 Constructive Critique Points
3 Jun 2008 - 1:49 PM

My father takes it to the next level with debit cards... he won't even use them for cash withdrawals! Still uses cheques to withdraw cash.

However, he uses his credit card quite happlily.

nickyv32
nickyv32 e2 Member 6135 forum postsnickyv32 vcard England
3 Jun 2008 - 2:00 PM

I have just spoken to the Company that SHE purchased the goods from and they said she went in with my Debit card in her hand and made the purchase, so WHERE did she get my PIN number and HOW as I still have my card in my purse...........
The plot thickens.

Metalhead
Metalhead  61863 forum posts England2 Constructive Critique Points
3 Jun 2008 - 2:10 PM

Sounds like it might've been "skimmed" and copied onto a blank card. I think this happens when someone dodgy works in a store and swipes your card in a second machine that copies the details then "imprints" them onto a fresh card, PIN details and everything. I've read about this kind of thing, and it seems the only way to have a physical card if you've got the original...

Or maybe someone infiltrated your post and ordered a new card under your details?

People are so deviant these days, yet most of us (myself included!) use our cards so liberally. Though I do burn all paperwork with any details on it.

Sorry to hear you've been scammed - hope it gets sorted soon.

Coleslaw
Coleslaw e2 Member 813402 forum postsColeslaw vcard Wales28 Constructive Critique Points
3 Jun 2008 - 2:12 PM

I have just spoken to my friend, apparently someone used his debit card to purchase alcohol (wine?) fom America (forever21bp) and to top up Orange phone!
The bank said they will refund him and cancel his card, luckily.

Strobe
Strobe  61254 forum posts United States
3 Jun 2008 - 2:13 PM


Quote: WHERE did she get my PIN number and HOW as I still have my card in my purse...........
The plot thickens.

When you use your PIN number the data on the CHIP & PIN device is unencrypted and therefore quite easy to get (for someone who knows what they are doing). I have seen how this gets done first hand and it is quite scary how often it happens. Gangs can record all the data from your card, including PIN and re manufacture the same card.

conrad
conrad e2 Member 910870 forum postsconrad vcard 116 Constructive Critique Points
3 Jun 2008 - 2:15 PM


Quote: I do burn all paperwork with any details on it.

So do I. And on advice of the banks in my country I always check what happens to my credit card when I hand it over for a payment. If a clerk would take it out of sight, I would immediately protest and demand to see what he or she is doing with it.

mark_delta
3 Jun 2008 - 2:20 PM

Looking on the net I found this on a group:
The most common method of card details theft is the wireless pin and chip terminal, these are well know to be getting intercepted and the information decoded just using a radio scanner and laptop, the details are just programmed in to a new card, as they already have your pin captured over air, then its a easy job !
they just make a copy and use your pin number
The banks opted for the lower security option to save money on the encryption software, rumour from the internet has it that the encryption was hacked by a 14 year old child within 4 hours of going live.

the other thing to remember is that call centres abroad are not covered by our data protection laws, so giving out details to off shore call centres is just plane stupid !

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