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Taking imaginary photos with your hands...

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yellowmunky
17 May 2009 - 8:41 PM

OK... what's your thoughts on people who hold up their hands and shape the fingers into a 'representation' of a final image?

I watched the 'Apprentice' last week where a candidate did this and I just laughed a proper 'snorty' laugh.

Naturally, the candidate on the show is a complete tool (not even a useful tool; a jelly hammer, if you will)...

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17 May 2009 - 8:41 PM

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Pete
Pete Site Moderator 1318446 forum postsPete vcard ePz Advertiser England96 Constructive Critique Points
17 May 2009 - 8:52 PM


Quote: I watched the 'Apprentice' last week where a candidate did this and I just laughed a proper 'snorty' laugh.

It wasn't just once either, he did it about seven times. It's as though he'd found a new toy Wink

I have to admit to using this technique as a framing device to save getting the camera out. I've not done it for a long time though.

Last Modified By Pete at 17 May 2009 - 8:54 PM
andytvcams
andytvcams  1110396 forum posts United Kingdom
17 May 2009 - 9:01 PM

Often used in film and television.
But what is really funny we get paid doing it.

Last Modified By andytvcams at 17 May 2009 - 9:03 PM
yellowmunky
17 May 2009 - 9:03 PM

It's something i have done at most twice, and felt no benefit over my own eyes...

That Ben chap on the show though; i really was in tears of laughter, especially when they collated those bits for the sister show 'You're fired' Smile

Coleslaw
Coleslaw e2 Member 913403 forum postsColeslaw vcard Wales28 Constructive Critique Points
17 May 2009 - 9:06 PM

I don't understand the logic of that though. Surely, it depends on the lens you use, as you might not get the 'frame of your fingers' otherwise.

Just people trying to make themselves look like a pro... Smile

justin c
justin c  104527 forum posts England36 Constructive Critique Points
17 May 2009 - 9:09 PM

I find gluing a hot shoe spirit level to the top of the index finger helps keep the horizon straight Wink

Last Modified By justin c at 17 May 2009 - 9:09 PM
yellowmunky
17 May 2009 - 9:15 PM

I did try stirring my tea once with an L series lens... not a good idea upon reflection...

joolsb
joolsb  927115 forum posts Switzerland38 Constructive Critique Points
17 May 2009 - 9:23 PM

I do it all the time. I've also gone to the trouble of cutting up some mountboard so it has a cut-out that's the same size as a sheet of 5x4. I find it's a useful aid to composition as it cuts out all the clutter and allows you to look hard at what you want to photograph.

It makes a lot of sense if you don't want to get the camera out and 'machine-gun' everything.

Pete
Pete Site Moderator 1318446 forum postsPete vcard ePz Advertiser England96 Constructive Critique Points
17 May 2009 - 10:11 PM


Quote: I've also gone to the trouble of cutting up some mountboard so it has a cut-out that's the same size as a sheet of 5x4

Yes I did the same when I used to use my MPP because it was such a faff getting the camera set up so you could see the image through the lens on the ground glass screen. But for SLR photography it's almost as quick to use the camera.

keith selmes
17 May 2009 - 10:59 PM

I have a beginners guide to painting and drawing which recommends having several viewfinders made from light card in different formats.

I have tried it for MF and LF with an MPP.

The beginers guide also describes how to make a Claude Glass

Interesting idea, and might be instructive, but I've never tried it.

I think I have done the framing with fingers thing as a leg pull, but not seriously.

Fishnet
Fishnet  104976 forum posts United Kingdom5 Constructive Critique Points
18 May 2009 - 12:20 AM

I tried it after I saw the Apprentice and I found it really annoying and having the rest of my vision obscured made it harder for me to compose the image.

SuziBlue
SuziBlue  1116195 forum posts Scotland10 Constructive Critique Points
18 May 2009 - 12:30 AM

I find I can block out what doesn't need to be in the image by just seeing what I want there to be in the frame. So it's half seeing it and half feeling it.

riprap007
riprap007  101568 forum posts England37 Constructive Critique Points
18 May 2009 - 12:38 AM

'I've also gone to the trouble of cutting up some mountboard', I seen this technique used often when people teach composition in photography

yellowmunky
18 May 2009 - 2:03 AM

This is the way I see it... in the 'Apprentice', it was laughable... the guy (Ben) has probably never stepped beyond the realms of a throwaway jobbie, yet still let his ego be his amigo...

In our profession, it's different... it's not for me, but I can appreciate some people adopting this approach it it aids them... for me, I've always had no issue with visualising the composition without any card or hands, and am quite happy to move on my feet, or use a zoom... my hands or card to myself are no substitute for my eyes and imagination, but again, that's just down to my preference, and have the utmost respect for whatever tools (or lack of tools) people use to bag their final image/s

Last Modified By yellowmunky at 18 May 2009 - 2:05 AM
Graywolf
Graywolf  7964 forum posts United Kingdom
18 May 2009 - 7:15 AM

What's the apprentice?

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