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Talking about kit is tedious... ?


ade_mcfade e2
10 15.1k 216 England
8 Mar 2011 8:09PM
I think you're referring to "technique" there Lawbert

unless you class buildings as "photographic kit"

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Paul Morgan e2
13 16.2k 6 England
8 Mar 2011 8:58PM
Yep

Unless your baiting Smile
ade_mcfade e2
10 15.1k 216 England
8 Mar 2011 10:40PM
well "getting buildings right" is a technique that is kit-independent, same applies to canon as nikon etc.

techniques are "how" we do things

kit relates to the tools we use


take the humble hammer - we use those to hammer nails in. the technique however is to hold the nail in the place we want it to enter the wood, then accelerate the flat part of the hammer towards the head of the nail - the momentum of the hammer head will cause an impact on the nail, that will then offer opposing force and also some friction as it slides into the wood.... or something like that.

the hammer we use isn't really that important, but the technique is - you end up hitting your hand and getting bruise or broken thumbnail if you get that wrong. Sure, you can get Stanley hammers, they're pretty cool, have a "hook" on the back to pull nails out with too. But in reality, its how "YOU" use it that creates the success or the bruise Wink
Overread e2
6 3.9k 18 England
8 Mar 2011 10:58PM
Ahh but the hammer you use is important - greatly important! As you said some hammers have hooks on the end and a good claw is worth investing in over an average hammer with a poorer quality claw (good claws are really good at getting nails out whilst the rest are just average or poor Wink)

And then there is the size of hammer - sledge or toffee? Or something in the middle?
And then you have the actual grip part of the hammer and how well its attached to the head - it is impossible to hammer with a cheap handle safely (at some point the head will fly off). Wink

Technique of course comes into it and explains why someone with a single average hammer can build a great structure that a guy with 50 of the best hammers for each job can't even get the nail in once right.



For some reason though photographers are always mad about splitting things into hammers, the use of and the final product when in the end its all a multi part process. The net just gets more gearheads because - lets face it - gearheads are more likely to use the net to talk about stuff ( cause they can do it on more gear! Wink).
strawman e2
11 22.0k 16 United Kingdom
8 Mar 2011 11:00PM
Is it not that photography by its very nature is more technical in nature than many other equivalent activities.
Overread e2
6 3.9k 18 England
8 Mar 2011 11:03PM
I'm 100% sure that dedicated amateur artists spend hour upon hour debating upon the best brushes - paints - mixes of paints - pencils - canvas - easels - the best mix for clay etc.... Wink
strawman e2
11 22.0k 16 United Kingdom
8 Mar 2011 11:04PM
I was thinking the difference between a sketch artist and a draftsman for example.
ketch e2
7 770 50 Turks And Caicos Islands
8 Mar 2011 11:21PM
I see you use sable never could get on with that myself - always use virgin badger or vietnamese timber mouse for fine detail work.

Hooray at last a posting that I can 100% agree with - and yes it entirely chimes with the thread on Real Photographers.

Wink
ade_mcfade e2
10 15.1k 216 England
8 Mar 2011 11:22PM
the hammer analogy holds true with lenses I guess

big lenses - big hammers
little lenses - little hammers

you can make a right arse of a job with any of them if you don't know what you're doing Wink


I guess you can either get on with "photography" or get hung-up on the tools you use.
Overread e2
6 3.9k 18 England
8 Mar 2011 11:33PM

Quote:I guess you can either get on with "photography" or get hung-up on the tools you use.


Can't we do both ? TongueWink
ade_mcfade e2
10 15.1k 216 England
8 Mar 2011 11:41PM
you can only do one thing at once

so the answer is "no" I guess Tongue
Overread e2
6 3.9k 18 England
8 Mar 2011 11:59PM

Quote:You can only do one thing at once

so the answer is "no" I guess Tongue



Is this where the women come in to teach us of multitasking? WinkGrin
ade_mcfade e2
10 15.1k 216 England
9 Mar 2011 12:07AM
I was expecting one to jump I must admit Wink

multitasking is a lie - you really can only do one thing at once, you have to "time splice" rather than multi-task... which means you only pay attention to each task a small amount of time before moving to the next, then back to the first then back to the... so you really are better concentrating on the task in hand, then when you've done that, you move on to the next and do that properly Wink
Overread e2
6 3.9k 18 England
9 Mar 2011 12:30AM
Heh having just read Thief of Time and Night Watch I'd say if you want time splicing advice have a chat with Lu-Tze. Though in my own mortal experience of time splicing I can say that it does not work when cooking sausages or BBQs (which is why guys always have to do them Tongue)
ade_mcfade e2
10 15.1k 216 England
9 Mar 2011 12:34AM
..I just knew about it from my old software engineering days Smile

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