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Teleconverters/Extenders

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    gjfereday
    gjfereday  246 forum posts United Kingdom
    16 Jan 2013 - 12:24 PM

    I've just bought a Canon EF 70-300mm lens and considering buying a 1.4x converter to go with it. I realise this affects the aperture but my question is whether I'll have difficulty shooting wildlife in the local conservation area because of this.

    Buying a 400mm prime lens just isn't in my budget unfortunately so any advice would be greatly appreciated.

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    cameracat
    cameracat  108578 forum posts Norfolk Island61 Constructive Critique Points
    16 Jan 2013 - 12:45 PM

    That lens & converter option is best avoided, Assuming it works in the first place.

    As for shooting wildlife, Assuming a converter would work with the lens you mention, Your AF speed would be adversely affected, You may even find it will struggle to focus at f/5.6, Maybe not even that, So you would need to shoot manual focus, Great if you subject stands still for long enough.


    Quote: Buying a 400mm prime lens just isn't in my budget

    Why a prime? You can get something like a Sigma 150mm X 500mm zoom, With stabilising, This would give you much better results than a 70-300mm with telecon attached.

    Its your call though....Wink

    To be honest, Unless your making your living at wildlife photography, Primes are just an expensive toy.....Wink

    Last Modified By cameracat at 16 Jan 2013 - 12:48 PM
    gjfereday
    gjfereday  246 forum posts United Kingdom
    16 Jan 2013 - 12:54 PM

    Camercat, thank you, that's exactly the advice I needed. I'll cancel my order and go down this route instead. Thanks You.

    MikeRC
    MikeRC e2 Member 93501 forum postsMikeRC vcard United Kingdom
    16 Jan 2013 - 1:59 PM

    Hi...bear in mind it weighs in at 2 ton...sorry 2 kilos....just feels like 2 ton Smile
    .....Mike

    KathyW
    KathyW  111793 forum posts Norfolk Island12 Constructive Critique Points
    16 Jan 2013 - 2:33 PM

    I hope you have cancelled your order Graham, because the 1.4 extender (I assume that is what you mean) won't fit on it. Losing the AF wouldn't be an issue because it won't physically fit on the 70-300 anyway. Maybe look for a S/H 100-400 or the Sigma that Cameracat suggested?

    mikehit
    mikehit  56476 forum posts United Kingdom9 Constructive Critique Points
    16 Jan 2013 - 6:50 PM

    The Canon 1.4x tc will not fit on the 70-300 but the Tamron or Kenko tcs will.
    The 150-500 is still a good alternative though.

    KathyW
    KathyW  111793 forum posts Norfolk Island12 Constructive Critique Points
    16 Jan 2013 - 8:53 PM

    Yes, non-canon brands will fit - sorry, just assumed it was the canon one, possibly because I have a 1.4x mk2 to sell if anyone is interested... goes nicely on prime L lenses or 70-200 2.8L Smile

    MichaelMelb_AU
    16 Jan 2013 - 9:38 PM


    Quote: I've just bought a Canon EF 70-300mm lens and considering buying a 1.4x converter to go with it. I realise this affects the aperture but my question is whether I'll have difficulty shooting wildlife in the local conservation area because of this.

    Buying a 400mm prime lens just isn't in my budget unfortunately so any advice would be greatly appreciated.

    If you are not doing it for money and do not produce large prints - better buy a modern superzoom. There would be a few reasons for that:
    1. You need tele- for making closeups of animals from some distance. Superzoom will do that for you, and while picture will be slightly less detailed, it will be much sharper.
    2. Superzoom will give you up to 1000mm lens for roughly the cost of a decent teleconverter. Do not forget - teleconverter needs to extend lens signal lines as well. This sort of converter is very expensive.
    3.Superzoom will allow you to take images in dimmer light. With light loss in teleconverter the whole DSLR system may be too "dim" for dusk or dawn use.
    4.You will not need to use a tripod, a must for 300mmx1.4 - unless in a very bright light. Modern superzooms have very efficient image stabilizers, and they are much lighter to hold steady.

    Image quality of zoom cameras was very restricting in recent past, but modern progress in sensors/optics put them almost on par with DSLR for small print/Internet imaging.
    Have fun!

    Last Modified By MichaelMelb_AU at 16 Jan 2013 - 9:40 PM
    StrayCat
    StrayCat e2 Member 1014818 forum postsStrayCat vcard Canada2 Constructive Critique Points
    16 Jan 2013 - 9:50 PM

    With a teleconverter on that lens, you will lose auto-focus, and the image quality would be very questionable. Teleconverters should only be used on lenses with a wide max aperture such as f2.8, or a minimum of f4.0, because you will lose 1 stop of light with a 1.4, and more with a higher magnification. There's no really cheap way of getting to the focal length, and retaining quality, you're looking for, I'm afraid.

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