Take your photography to the next level and beyond...

  • NEWS
  • REVIEWS
  • INSPIRATION
  • COMMUNITY
  • COMPETITIONS

Why not join for free today?

Join for Free

Your total photography experience starts here


PRIZES GALORE! Enter The ePHOTOzine Exclusive Christmas Prize Draw; Over £10,000 Worth of Prizes! Plus A Gift For Everybody On Christmas Day!

Thank god we have come out of the dark ages


Carabosse e2
11 39.7k 269 England
16 Jun 2012 10:47PM

Quote:Some people believe that fairies exist


Cue for this photographic story. Smile

Join ePHOTOzine for free and remove these adverts.

16 Jun 2012 11:03PM
Must have been the famous 'Fairy nuff' Wink
Carabosse e2
11 39.7k 269 England
16 Jun 2012 11:06PM
These days Photoshop would be the prime suspect. Can you imagine any of those photos being accepted as genuine these days? Grin
Carabosse e2
11 39.7k 269 England
16 Jun 2012 11:23PM
These little creatures I photographed were entirely genuine though! Tongue

fairies.jpg

Carabosse e2
11 39.7k 269 England
16 Jun 2012 11:46PM
Oh and I just about managed to fire off another shot before as they flew off.... but they are so ethereal, when in flight, it can be bit hard to see the creature in this photo. I do hope nobody feels sceptical about these pics....................... Smile

fairies2.jpg



tongue2-light.jpg

Jestertheclown 6 6.6k 242 England
16 Jun 2012 11:52PM
CB!
As if I'd ever doubt or question your integrity.


. . . or you, mine!
monstersnowman 9 1.7k 1 England
16 Jun 2012 11:57PM
Well I have seen some amazing images of John Terry and I can't see them being fake ... its got me wondering Grin

Really ?? JT gets around
Tooth 9 5.8k 227 Ireland
17 Jun 2012 1:42AM

Quote:I watched a programme that filmed a cold reading. At the end the person believed the reading had gone amazingly and that the medium was pretty much bang on. With facts they couldn't have known. It was laughable because the whole reading was riddled with false statements, lots of leading and information given by the person to the medium. The correct things came from being read by the medium in their responses, things they said and guesswork. The vast majority of things said by the medium were wrong and any avenues gone down by the medium were backed out of when the reading showed the medium it was not right. The amazing thing was that the person having the reading did not remember any of the wrong suggestions or how they gave things away. They only remembered the good bits and thought it was an excellent reading when anyone watching could see how very bad it was. Added to that, in re-telling the quality of the reading to friends the person will probably, without even realising, embellish the story to make their account more astounding and they will probably recall things as being even better themselves over time .... All from a terrible piece of cold reading from someone with no powers


Straying off a bit, but it's similar to the way complementary/alternative health therapies have massive sales desppite an absolute lack of scientific evidence for their effectiveness. Most things naturally get better with time, and if you happen to be taking (or giving to your animal) a therapy at the same time, it's easy to accredit that with the improvement. The times it had no effect get forgotten and shrugged off, but the improvements get remembered..

I seriously wonder at the morals of pharmacies today when they are forced to make a large (if not the greatest) part of their income from "alternative" items which the scientifically trained pharmacists almost certainly know have no benefical effect.

dscuss Wink
monstersnowman 9 1.7k 1 England
17 Jun 2012 2:16AM
The term 'alternative' may be a broad school ... many medicines that may be called alternative or herbal may be very effective and indeed many natural drugs are effective if not also so effective they can be dangerous. As a slight aside, I dont go for this homeopathy lark and studies have regularily shown no effect other than placebo but it remains very popular. I am a firm believer that a lot of people suffer aches and pains that stem from psychological reasons even if these pains feel very real so it is no surprise if a harmless and ineffective drug does offer psychological benefits and in turn pain relieving results - placebo trials usually sort the wheat from the chaff tho. A moral dilemma is - if a medicine that is technically and medicinally ineffective relieves a persons psychological pains and troubles (whether they accept their troubles are psychologically based or not) should it be prescribed and paid for by the NHS even tho the NHS know it is nothing more than a sugar pill ? The psychological treatment may be truer to the cause but more long term, expensive and less effective ... what avenue should be taken - some may see prescribing sugar pills as an expense the NHS should not meet as it is in itself not treating the cause and is definately misleading and deceiving the patient as to the nature/content of the drugs or sugar they are taking and, in many cases, paying for.
joolsb 10 27.1k 38 Switzerland
17 Jun 2012 9:19AM
It's a shame nobody seems to have noticed some salient points:

1) The original 'crime' occurred during 1941 when paranoia about an imminent German invasion was at its height
2) The seance took place in Portsmouth, a port with a long naval history
3) information about a sinking was 'revealed' which was being kept quiet by the military for tactical reasons (presumably the navy crews and their relatives all knew and this information was 'extracted' by the usual techniques of mediums).

So, the military was faced with someone who goes to sensitive areas, claiming to put people in touch with dead servicemen and, in so doing, manages to extract (benignly), and make public, information that the military didn't want people to know (for perfectly valid reasons, given the situation).

OK, the charges were nonsensical but it was obviously felt, in that atmosphere of paranoia, that the woman was a threat to national security. Yes, it was all a bit heavy-handed but I can see why the powers-that-be of the time would want her locked up.
lemmy 7 2.0k United Kingdom
17 Jun 2012 12:59PM

Quote:I don't believe that most of the small time mediums out there are frauds, most are fooling themselves as much as they are fooling their clients.


Absolutely. I've watched several in action through my job. But actually listen to what they say and they are fishing, picking out and stating the obvious. They are very instinctively clever in the way that a good con man is. They know what buttons to push, how to work on weaker peoples' fears and uncertainties. I remember seeing a TV magician doing a psychic act (having told you he was not a mystic or a psychic) and he was able to perform more convincingly and with more allegedly 'how could he have know that' facts than most of the real ones.

Someone says 'imagine your state of mind if you lost someone close'.

My father died when he was 39 and I was a boy. It hit me like a sledgehammer. I lost a great friend to an IRA bomb in the 90s. Neither event led me to believe in or go to pychics because I stayed rational. Terrible things happen. They are random and acceptance is the only way through them, a long process. Psychics, in my view, prevent acceptance. On the other hand, if you are the kind of person who cannot accept the world as it is, I don't suppose the psychics do too much harm.
monstersnowman 9 1.7k 1 England
17 Jun 2012 1:12PM

Quote:It's a shame nobody seems to have noticed some salient points:

1) The original 'crime' occurred during 1941 when paranoia about an imminent German invasion was at its height
2) The seance took place in Portsmouth, a port with a long naval history
3) information about a sinking was 'revealed' which was being kept quiet by the military for tactical reasons (presumably the navy crews and their relatives all knew and this information was 'extracted' by the usual techniques of mediums).

So, the military was faced with someone who goes to sensitive areas, claiming to put people in touch with dead servicemen and, in so doing, manages to extract (benignly), and make public, information that the military didn't want people to know (for perfectly valid reasons, given the situation).

OK, the charges were nonsensical but it was obviously felt, in that atmosphere of paranoia, that the woman was a threat to national security. Yes, it was all a bit heavy-handed but I can see why the powers-that-be of the time would want her locked up.



I didn't miss this ... I did state that this was an exercise in silencing and prosecuting someone divulging sensitive military information during wartime. If you ask me she was lucky she only got what she got, considering she was basically a person, in wartime, stood onstage, in public giving away military secrets she had come by somehow, for anyone to hear, threatening our national security, our soldiers and our chances of being invaded and losing the war ... not to mention being a fraudsters. Does she deserve any sympathy, nope.
lemmy 7 2.0k United Kingdom
17 Jun 2012 3:22PM

Quote:Does she deserve any sympathy, nope.


She'll get some, though, because many people do not have enough imagination to place her in the context of a time of destruction, death, scarcity and fear. They judge everything by present times. They have always been cosseted by a welfare state and cannot imagine how anything could harm them so they take a liberal stance on everything without thought or understanding.

Those people are the first ones to turn nasty when their comfortable lives are disrupted, though.
joolsb 10 27.1k 38 Switzerland
17 Jun 2012 8:16PM

Quote:I didn't miss this ...


Indeed you didn't. Smile

For 'nobody', read 'nobody apart from monstersnowman...' Wink
monstersnowman 9 1.7k 1 England
18 Jun 2012 5:13AM
Thats better joolsb ... sometimes reading the posts is better than posting a comment after assuming nobody has reached the same conculsion you have some pages earlier Wink Credit us with some intelligence.

Sign In

You must be a member to leave a comment.

ePHOTOzine, the web's friendliest photography community.

Join For Free

Upload photos, chat with photographers, win prizes and much more.