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The Death of Photographic Portraiture

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strawman
strawman  1022010 forum posts United Kingdom16 Constructive Critique Points
21 Jun 2005 - 9:49 AM

It sounds like we have achieved the same compromise on two different types of cameras.

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21 Jun 2005 - 9:49 AM

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Doclassie
Doclassie  91135 forum posts England
21 Jun 2005 - 10:00 AM

Indeedly

Hey, Strawman, I have a bone to pick with you.

"Also maybe allowing number of views to be seen by those other than Ep2 members...... I personally would find that more useful."

I said this last night to which you said something about bobbing along for free means you get what you're given (or more or less)

I'm not an E2 member but I aint bobbing free either.... cost me 5 quid to join this site. The only site of this nature I've ever seen where to do have to pay!

Just Jas
Just Jas  1225752 forum posts England1 Constructive Critique Points
21 Jun 2005 - 10:57 AM


Quote: Jas Do I count as an old hand or an old bodger. Just so I know if I can chip in.

John - Sorry to have opted out of this discussion but I have spent the afternoon in bed in bloody pain! It's a repetitive thing and I just have to put up with it.

Back on the forum later in the week hopefully.

jas

keith selmes
21 Jun 2005 - 11:07 AM

Hi Andrew, a lot of people got in free, and many are no doubt still bobbing along.
The 5 fee is fairly new, it has cut out a lot of bother with trolls and troublemakers, which is why it was introduced.
But I suppose the fee has been there long enough now, that people who paid it aren't flagged as new members any more, so we can't easily see who paid and who didn't.

sillyconguru
21 Jun 2005 - 3:02 PM

I'm one that didn't pay, but I have pre-paid for this book.

c_evans99
c_evans99  117013 forum posts Wales1 Constructive Critique Points
21 Jun 2005 - 3:12 PM

'Sharpness' is not a new concern - 'acutance' entered the fray in film photography with Br Beutler in the early fifties, and there are ways of controlling it in the camera/darkroom - a high-definition developer like Neofin Blau and a thin emulsion film to increase acutance for example, or the use of a 'solvent' developer to reduce grain at the expense of sharpness - there's nothing new undr the sun

strawman
strawman  1022010 forum posts United Kingdom16 Constructive Critique Points
21 Jun 2005 - 3:14 PM

Jas get well soon. I hope the pain eases up.

Doclassie please feel free to pick my bones I could do with losing a bit of weight. Come join e2 its no more than most magazines cost and it will allow more features to be added.

I once suggested that e2 members should have the right to select an ordinary members portfolio and delete the RC's in one post on clicks. sadly they took me seriously.

Just Jas
Just Jas  1225752 forum posts England1 Constructive Critique Points
21 Jun 2005 - 3:23 PM

Thanks John.

Nite all,

jas

acbeat
acbeat  9 United Kingdom
21 Jun 2005 - 4:10 PM

my son is off to college in september on a 4 yr quest to become a photo jounalist. he's not allowed to use digital for the first year only film. this will teach him the basics without ps

david_h
david_h  9181 forum posts
21 Jun 2005 - 5:46 PM

Thank goodness photography in all its fantastic guises is subjective.
David

keith selmes
23 Jun 2005 - 1:45 PM

When we set up our apple labs for the photography and media people, they were behind schedule. (What else is new)
Contemplating the start of term, the chief technician said thoughtfully, well, never mind, they could start the new students with pencil and paper sketching, it'd do 'em good anyway. Back to basics!

magda_indigo
24 Jun 2005 - 9:18 AM

At last a more interesting thread.
I know I have to structure my writing very carefully.
I know it is going to be dissected by the forum forensics (all in good cheers, Im writing this with a big smile).
PHOTOGRAPHY: from the classical Greek
Photon=light
Grafein=to write, to paint.
PHOTOGRAPHY:
1: the act of taking and printing photographs.
2: the process of producing images of objects on photosensitive surfaces.
3: the occupation of taking and printing photographs or making movies. (Dictionary.com)
Like everything else, you need the tools of the trade
Camera, light and ACTION!
Note I wrote camera, no distinction, it is my firm conviction that it is the person using the tools that is responsible for the result.

So that whole squabble and debate about film/digital, I WILL NOT EVEN GO INTO THAT! Because it is irrelevant.
Give me any camera and Ill do you the job, thats a fact not a boast, been there, worn the T-shirt, bla-bla-bla!
Personally, far more important, a good portrait depends on my ability to communicate with the subject, my rapport.
This does not come easy to me, because Im a shy person.
BUT, IT IS A BARRIER I OVERCOME EACH TIME.
If I can put them at ease, often simply by empathizing about the fact that I do understand, because I also do not like to be photographed, relax them, often by explaining what is going on, why a specific light or lens, they get interested and into it.
You always have the hopeless ones (like, for example, radio-people, now I know why they are just a voice!!), but the TV-people are difficult in a different way, as soon as they sense the lens, they give you the stereo-type, standard smile, which is also not what I want.
Why portraits less appreciated on EPZ, I think most people are scared?
I had one comment;
I usually don't click on portraits because I don't know much about them (but I hope to someday). But this is a classic that gives me lots of ideas on how to do them!
Answersonapostcard wrote here:
And Magda is a professional with many years experience. Most of us amateurs are still learning and finding our feet.
Do you think Ive stopped learning? I probably work harder at it than any of you, trying out different, new light settings and techniques.
You must all realize that, like in everything else, theres ever changing TREND.
You only have to look at the family/school/wedding portrait of 50-20 years ago!!!!!!!!
I say it time and time again, ANYBODY who wants my advice on anything can contact me, I love helping people and I have no secrets.
On Monday, another portrait coming, complete with lesson and confession. (*,*)

ljesmith
ljesmith  101092 forum posts United Kingdom
24 Jun 2005 - 9:29 AM

Well said Magda, for me there is no more rewarding photography than portraiture, you can gain so much from the interaction with people, they will let you into their lives and give you what I feel is the ultimate trust.

answersonapostcard
answersonapostcard Site Moderator 1012606 forum postsanswersonapostcard vcard United Kingdom15 Constructive Critique Points
24 Jun 2005 - 9:41 AM

I made no judgment about you having stopped learning Magda, in fact I'm glad to hear you say you still are, because life is a continual learning curve, not just in photography, anyone who says they know it all would be an arrogant person. My point was that we amateurs and our work are being compared to a professional, someone who has had many years experience and has had advice from another professional. If in the first year of your life with a camera someone said that you were killing portraiture because of what you do and said take a look at (for instance) David Bailey, wouldnt you just feel a little disallusioned and downhearted? As far as
Quote: I probably work harder at it than any of you

you should see my lounge! LOL Its a make shift studio, I havent found the TV for months! I worked for 3 hours solid on one flower, taking pictures of it from every angle with every available lighting angle. I eat, sleep and breathe this bloody hobby! LOL! People photography has to be one of the hardest disciplines. I hope this doesnt sound bad but I have never felt so passionate about a subject before.

magda_indigo
24 Jun 2005 - 9:58 AM

K. I'm sorry, but it was not aimed at you.
But now that you've tackled this, maybe that's the problem, 'overdoing' it?
It is not only in PS that shots get 'overcooked', it can also happen in the studio.
A good Artist knows when to stop, when it is 'done'!
Try to keep things fresh, keep it light and fun, above all. You can always go back to experiments.
That's how it works with film anyway, if the results are unsatisfactory, it's back to the drawing board.
Like I said, it's all in good cheer, be passionate but not oversensitive.
(*_*)

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