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Paul Morgan
Paul Morgan e2 Member 1315362 forum postsPaul Morgan vcard England6 Constructive Critique Points
29 Aug 2014 - 9:21 PM


Quote: Let's get thyroid out of equation. The only decease that changes sugar (glucose) balance directly is diabetes. But that is different gland. Yes, hyperthyroidism often causes loss of weight as a collateral of hyperactivity. But hypo-activity does not seem to be a direct result of hypothyroidism, rather person's lack of will to deal with lifestyle adjustment. This assumes the condition is known to the person, of course.

As all the "low energy" drinks, etc. - I am always very aware about including in my diet any substances that are not part of natural human food. Cannot be avoided completely, rather need to be consumed in moderation. That's my recipe, bake whatever you like from itWink.There is a lot of confusion between hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism: Hypothyroidism is caused by having an under-active thyroid while hyperthyroidism is caused by having an over-active thyroid.

I went from one extreme to the other Smile

As for eating healthy, everything in moderation is just fine, I don`t diet or watch what I eat.

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29 Aug 2014 - 9:21 PM

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Chris_L
Chris_L e2 Member 883 forum postsChris_L vcard United Kingdom
29 Aug 2014 - 9:57 PM

In January I was diagnosed with "low thyroid" - I'd put on weight and I was constantly tired. I have to take Levothyroxine. I've lost a stone but I don't feel any more energetic. My whiskers seem to grow faster. Doctor increased the dose the other day.

Was talking to someone who has had problems for years. She reckons GPs don't study the thyroid too much when training. She warned me about exercise. Normally it's good to push yourself hard to get the most from exercise but if you have certain thyroid conditions, your body's recovery time is much longer and you can make yourself quite ill from over exercising. Insomnia is common (at the minute I never get to sleep before 4am).

Paul Morgan
Paul Morgan e2 Member 1315362 forum postsPaul Morgan vcard England6 Constructive Critique Points
29 Aug 2014 - 10:05 PM

Is you GP still running routine blood test, it could take a while to get the levels just right, it still quite early days for you Chris so persevere.

Also take the thyroxine first thing in the morning on an empty stomach, 30 minutes to one hour before food, it gets absorbed better this way.

Also get your cholesterol checked, its often raised if your hypo.

Last Modified By Paul Morgan at 29 Aug 2014 - 10:08 PM
Chris_L
Chris_L e2 Member 883 forum postsChris_L vcard United Kingdom
29 Aug 2014 - 10:22 PM

Yeah my cholesterol is high (and I avoid that kind of food) nurse thinks I should get a statin, doctor doesn't agree. Get bloods every six months. Am seeing a different doctor soon, I'll see if she has a different take on things.

Paul Morgan
Paul Morgan e2 Member 1315362 forum postsPaul Morgan vcard England6 Constructive Critique Points
29 Aug 2014 - 10:38 PM

Most GP`s are pretty well up on the the thyroid, being hypo is very common, its probably more common than type 2 diabetes, after your next set of blood test they will probably have a better picture.

I wouldn`t worry to much about exercise, exercise is always good, just do what you can cope with, your own body will tell you if your pushing it to much.

gcarth
gcarth e2 Member 102289 forum postsgcarth vcard United Kingdom1 Constructive Critique Points
30 Aug 2014 - 3:49 PM


Quote: Yeah my cholesterol is high (and I avoid that kind of food) nurse thinks I should get a statin, doctor doesn't agree. Get bloods every six months. Am seeing a different doctor soon, I'll see if she has a different take on things.

I think your doctor may be right. However, I'm no expert and you are quite right to get advice from another doctor. If your cholesterol wasn't high, I would think statins should be a last resort because exercise together with diet can eventually lower your cholesterol levels. As I say, I think you are doing the right thing to see another doctor. My own cholesterol levels are borderline (or just over) and my doctor is monitoring me at 3 month intervals and will only recommend statins if my condition doesn't improve or worsens (I have hypothyroidism).

StrayCat
StrayCat e2 Member 1014803 forum postsStrayCat vcard Canada2 Constructive Critique Points
30 Aug 2014 - 4:19 PM

I have refused on a number of occasions to take cholesterol meds, they're very quick to prescribe them. The first time the doctor prescribed them for me about 20 years ago, I took them for a week or so, till I had researched what I was taking and found that it had barely passed the FDA approval tests in the US; it caused cancer of the kidneys, deadly, in a percentage of patients, but was approved by the FDA because the benefits barely out-weighed the cons. I've had 3 close friends who were taking it die from kidney cancer, and I know of a few more that I was told about. I don't remember the name of the medicine, but it's worth researching. Look into a reduced carb diet, along with moderate exercise such as walking as the quickest way to lower cholesterol levels, and about the easiest way to keep them where they should be. Watch the tryglyceride levels also, which tie in with the cholesterol; one big culprit in regards to high levels of these is alcohol. I have myself down to 2 metformin and 1 needle per day for diabetes 2, and one blood pressure pill, which I don't think I need, but the doctor says it also helps protect the kidneys. My BP is consistently 100/60-65.

One food that the dietician at the diabetes research centre told me to eat daily is Oat Bran, and it so happens, I love the stuff. It is one of the best foods for helping lower cholesterol, along with Olive Oil, which I put in my oat bran after cooking, great breakfast, and great snack in the late evening.

gcarth
gcarth e2 Member 102289 forum postsgcarth vcard United Kingdom1 Constructive Critique Points
30 Aug 2014 - 4:53 PM


Quote: Look into a reduced carb diet, along with moderate exercise such as walking as the quickest way to lower cholesterol levels, and about the easiest way to keep them where they should be.

Absolutely agree!

Wow! the rest of your quote was quite an eye-opener, Denny! I haven't done any real research but I think from what you say, it may be very wise to at least consider findings like yours.

StrayCat
StrayCat e2 Member 1014803 forum postsStrayCat vcard Canada2 Constructive Critique Points
30 Aug 2014 - 5:06 PM

We've mentioned the US as a culprit for developing unhealthy fast foods here. I read a study done on what is described as an epidemic of osteoporosis in children in the US, and at the time the suspected culprit was coke and Pepsi, because of a substance contained in them that prevents the body from absorbing calcium. Makes sense to me. I have a friend who is a coke-aholic, he used to drink a couple of those big bottles every day, he was hiding the stuff from his wife. He has done this since he was a child, and he's 69 now. He just got out of the hospital; close to 300 lbs, and covered with weeping sores, which his wife has been treating for years, externally. The problem is easy enough for a 5 year old to see, he has to stop drinking coke and eating fast food. His wife is off taking care of the grandchildren, and he's off eating deep fried fish and French fries, yummy. The thyroid hasn't been mentioned yet.

Yes, sugar is the big culprit when it comes to weight gain. We have a program on TV here, an investigative type program, always a very good, informative one-hour show. Several months ago it was about sugar, and how the refined product has permeated virtually all of our food products, the processed ones that is. Firstly, sugar does not exist in nature, without fibre. I wonder about honey? Some of the richest families in the world are the sugar barons, and the program pointed out that it was very difficult to track down these super wealthy people, and once they did, they could not gain access to them.

15 years ago when my wife and I quit smoking, we put on weight, despite walking 1.5 hours per day, and curbing our intake of junk food. I was told by our doctor that when quitting smoking, the metabolism slows for up to 3 years, and the appetite increases. We eventually went on the Atkin's Low Carb diet. This was back when the max carbs per day for the first 2 weeks was 25 g, that's only one apple. We stuck to it; I lost 41 lbs, and my wife lost 30 lbs in 3 months. I have never felt so good; boundless energy, no trouble sleeping through the night, my cholesterol was normal, as were the tryglycerides. However, it is almost impossible to re-introduce carbs to one's diet without going overboard, we're addicted to them. The excess carbs are converted to sugar by the body, and stored in the fat cells, and back goes the weight.

Back to sugar; while we were looking for low carb foods when we were on the diet we discovered that Campbell's food company, which I understand is worldwide, does not make one product without adding refined sugar. I wrote them, and asked them about it; why add sugar to soup? They didn't reply. They were a target of the study I mentioned above. Go to your grocer's and try and find processed food products that haven't had refined sugar in some form added; it's a futile exercise. Not only will refined sugar put weight on you if you don't go right out and burn it off with some sort of exercise, it will eventually start destroying the nerves in your body, starting with the extremities, as it does with diabetics who don't keep levels of it under control. Sugar is deadly, as is coke and pepsi.

Paul Morgan
Paul Morgan e2 Member 1315362 forum postsPaul Morgan vcard England6 Constructive Critique Points
30 Aug 2014 - 5:14 PM


Back to sugar; while we were looking for low carb foods when we were on the diet we discovered that Campbell's food company, which I understand is worldwide, does not make one product without adding refined sugar. I wrote them, and asked them about it; why add sugar to soup? They didn't reply.


Most fruits and vegetables contain there own sugars and some of this is lost through processing, cooking etc, its normal practice to add a little sugar.

Last Modified By Paul Morgan at 30 Aug 2014 - 5:14 PM
SlowSong
SlowSong e2 Member 64431 forum postsSlowSong vcard England29 Constructive Critique Points
30 Aug 2014 - 5:21 PM

I'm appalled that running on BBC2 at the moment is a programme called Making Sweets Simple. The advertising has been all over the screen early in the evenings, just when kids are watching. In fact, much of the actual advert consists of kids' voiceovers urging parents to watch the programme. How sick is that?! And one of the most popular series, Great British Bake Off, is running at the same time. The sugar industry must be bathing in champagne at the moment, whilst kids and adults are being force-fed these unhealthy and harmful programmes. You'd think someone in control had some sense wouldn't you.

StrayCat
StrayCat e2 Member 1014803 forum postsStrayCat vcard Canada2 Constructive Critique Points
30 Aug 2014 - 5:37 PM

Of course Paul, the sugar is added so that we crave the products, not because of a loss of natural sugars. Also, refined sugar has no fibre, so the body absorbs it into the blood stream almost immediately, giving that quick bump to the "fat hormone," insulin. Every time this happens, and the excess sugars are stored in the fat cells, they get larger. We go on a diet, and reduce the fat in those cells, but they have a memory, and what they remember is the highest fat content, and that's where they start. The next time the cell contains more fat, and so on. The replacing of naturally occurring sugars in nature, such as fruit and veggies, by refined sugar products is a crime against humanity; it is slowly increasing the incidences of diseases such as Diabetes 2. The proof is in the fact that Diabetes 2 is now considered an epidemic in North America, and it is showing up in alarming levels in very young children, being passed along from adult to child.

Another product that I avoid is fruit juices; once the fibre is removed from the product the sugar enters the blood stream in one big burst, and triggers high levels of insulin. This contributes to that mid-morning, and mid-afternoon wall we run up against, where we just have to close our eyes for a few minutes, and we can't help yawning our heads off. I didn't yawn for a couple years after doing the Atkins Diet, same with my wife, and you don't get that mid morning and mid afternoon tiredness. You can argue till you're blue in the face, as you usually do, but I know from experience and my own research that we are being led down the garden path where refined sugar is concerned.

My wife makes several kinds of soups, and sauces, and none of her recipes call for sugar, and we certainly don't miss it. It's one of the biggest scams in the world. Gol through your favorite recipe book, look for recipes that say add refined sugar products; I don't mean baked goods, I'm talking about basic meals.

StrayCat
StrayCat e2 Member 1014803 forum postsStrayCat vcard Canada2 Constructive Critique Points
30 Aug 2014 - 5:41 PM


Quote: You'd think someone in control had some sense wouldn't you.

One thing that the investigative reporters in the sugar program over here said was that their efforts to get the facts were blocked at every turn, including government agencies. The control the sugar industry exercises is huge, and extends far beyond what we can imagine.

brian1208
brian1208 e2 Member 1110266 forum postsbrian1208 vcard United Kingdom12 Constructive Critique Points
30 Aug 2014 - 7:04 PM


Quote: You'd think someone in control had some sense wouldn't you.

One thing that the investigative reporters in the sugar program over here said was that their efforts to get the facts were blocked at every turn, including government agencies. The control the sugar industry exercises is huge, and extends far beyond what we can imagine.

on the other hand, we have a saying in our family "the story is more important than the facts" so my sceptical mind makes me think "they would say that wouldn't they" Grin

arhb
arhb e2 Member 72273 forum postsarhb vcard United Kingdom68 Constructive Critique Points
30 Aug 2014 - 7:23 PM


Quote: I'm appalled that running on BBC2 at the moment is a programme called Making Sweets Simple. The advertising has been all over the screen early in the evenings, just when kids are watching. In fact, much of the actual advert consists of kids' voiceovers urging parents to watch the programme. How sick is that?! And one of the most popular series, Great British Bake Off, is running at the same time. The sugar industry must be bathing in champagne at the moment, whilst kids and adults are being force-fed these unhealthy and harmful programmes. You'd think someone in control had some sense wouldn't you.

This is so true Chris -
Just the amount of food programmes that are broadcast on a daily basis irritates me, given the diet issues the UK has.
I can only assume it's because these programmes are cheap to make?

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