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The War Years

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KarenFB
KarenFB Junior Gallery Team 84271 forum postsKarenFB vcard England163 Constructive Critique Points
21 Apr 2010 - 4:46 PM

My middle daughter posed a question I couldn't answer! We even looked on Google, but couldn't find out.

"When people's houses were bombed in the war, were they 'given' a new one?
Or was one just lent to them, until they'd found somewhere else?
Did they have to pay rent on it?
Where did they go until they were 'given' a new one?
What was the process they had to go through?"

If anyone here can throw some light on the subject, we'd be very grateful. It's not for school/college or anything like that - I just hate not being able to answer a question posed!

Last Modified By KarenFB at 21 Apr 2010 - 4:47 PM
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andytvcams
andytvcams  1110396 forum posts United Kingdom
21 Apr 2010 - 5:26 PM

From another website.


Quote: If your house was bombed you got NO compensation for anything,not even contents.You had to move in with relatives/friends,or if you had some income you could rent a house or flat.
Of course many women's husbands were away fighting,so they had very little income,and even less choice of where to live.
This is why there were so many Council Houses built so soon after the war,as many people were living in cramped (or overpriced) conditions;obviously they could not afford to buy a house,and before the war very few people had mortgages anyway;about 90% of people rented.
Basically,if your were bombed out you gathered up what you could,and hoped that a neighbour or relation would help you.
My Mother was killed when her house was bombed,and my 4 siblings had to go and live with my Aunt who already had 4 kids at home,and no man to support her/them.
Maybe I should write a book about this side of the war,the "forgotten" women and kids who had to put up with some awful experiences and living conditions.
To a certain extent we in the Army had it easy.At least we had a roof over our heads (most of the time) and food in our stomachs(always) and money in our wallets(even if it wasn't that much).
So to summarise an answer for you.
The Governments answer was~
"Get on with it,and don't expect much help from us"
It was the women and kids that really suffered.

Hope that helps.

Helpful Post! This post was flagged as helpful
Doglet
Doglet  755 forum posts United Kingdom
21 Apr 2010 - 5:44 PM

On a surreal note it's a bit like the present governments GrinGrin

thewilliam
21 Apr 2010 - 5:53 PM

No, it's nothing like the present government. Our present excuse for a government isn't leading us in a world war that was absolutely necessary, as during 19389-45.

Bailing out the banks did cost roughly the same amount as fighting the war, if you take inflation into account. And our fighting forces are every bit as brave and committed as they were then!

KarenFB
KarenFB Junior Gallery Team 84271 forum postsKarenFB vcard England163 Constructive Critique Points
21 Apr 2010 - 6:01 PM

Thanks for your input! grin-dark.jpg

When watching all the war documentaries, there is never much mentioned about the families left behind, and how they survived when their whole streets disappeared!

KevSB
KevSB  101407 forum posts United Kingdom5 Constructive Critique Points
21 Apr 2010 - 6:03 PM

Only reference i found was same as andy with this bit


During (and well before WW2) most working class people did not have house/contents insurance,if it existed,and I am not sure that it did.
If it DID then Insurance Companies (even now) do not pay out for "Acts of War"so certainly wouldn't have then.


In fact drawing parallels with today does modern day insurance not cover acts of terrorism

Helpful Post! This post was flagged as helpful
Doglet
Doglet  755 forum posts United Kingdom
22 Apr 2010 - 7:56 AM


Quote: No, it's nothing like the present government. Our present excuse for a government isn't leading us in a world war that was absolutely necessary, as during 19389-45.

Bailing out the banks did cost roughly the same amount as fighting the war, if you take inflation into account. And our fighting forces are every bit as brave and committed as they were then!

Excuse me but where in my comment did I say that the government in 1939/45 took us into an unnecessary war??? Also no comment was made about the brave troops fighting our cause!

Read the last para in the first post THIS is what was being referred too.


So to summarise an answer for you.
The Governments answer was~
"Get on with it,and don't expect much help from us"

Last Modified By Doglet at 22 Apr 2010 - 7:57 AM
lobsterboy
lobsterboy Site Moderator 1014128 forum postslobsterboy vcard United Kingdom13 Constructive Critique Points
22 Apr 2010 - 8:51 AM


Quote: During (and well before WW2) most working class people did not have house/contents insurance,if it existed,and I am not sure that it did.

Don't forget that in those days:
Most working class people rented their homes.
The contents wasn't worth that much either (no computers, play stations, TVs,cars, etc)

People say "back in those days you could leave your front door open" - it was mainly because no one had anything worth stealing!

Helpful Post! This post was flagged as helpful
brian1208
brian1208 e2 Member 1110234 forum postsbrian1208 vcard United Kingdom12 Constructive Critique Points
22 Apr 2010 - 9:33 AM


Quote: Most working class people rented their homes.

in fact most people rented their homes in those days.

Home ownership as we see it today is a quite recent thing with a big surge during the Thatcher years. In the earlier days a house was just somewhere to live, not an "Investment".

Last Modified By brian1208 at 22 Apr 2010 - 9:33 AM Helpful Post! This post was flagged as helpful
answersonapostcard
answersonapostcard Site Moderator 1012601 forum postsanswersonapostcard vcard United Kingdom15 Constructive Critique Points
22 Apr 2010 - 9:54 AM

Dont forget the 'good ole' PreFab

cats_123
cats_123 e2 Member 104014 forum postscats_123 vcard Northern Ireland25 Constructive Critique Points
22 Apr 2010 - 10:17 AM

if my memory serves me correctly, my parents (both took an active part in the war) had to live with relatives for about 4 yrs after demob. They eventually were able to get a council house, and after about 13/14yrs later managed to buy a house. My dad was a civil servant, a well respected job (in those days) that brought home more than average, my mom was a mom. So even with a decent salary, they couldn't afford a house of their own.

The house they bought (and lived in until they died) cost 4500. It is a large 3 bed semi in the W Midlands and we sold it on probate for about 180000.

I still remember visiting an aunt who lived in a prefab in B'ham and there are still post war pre-fabs in Letchworth, and also over here in NI.

Perhaps your daughter could make it a project to interview a few old people? There are sadly loads in care homes who would be only too pleased to talk to someone. Smile

Last Modified By cats_123 at 22 Apr 2010 - 10:17 AM Helpful Post! This post was flagged as helpful
KarenFB
KarenFB Junior Gallery Team 84271 forum postsKarenFB vcard England163 Constructive Critique Points
22 Apr 2010 - 10:17 AM

Oh yes, I've heard of the PreFabs.
Did all local governments build them?
Who decided who was to live in them?
Was it just a local government thing, or first come first served?
Was there a huge waiting list you had to join?

Each answer seems to lay itself open to more questions! Smile

montechoro
montechoro  112340 forum posts United Kingdom2 Constructive Critique Points
22 Apr 2010 - 10:30 AM

I was involved in the demolition and replacing of many pre-fabs with new housing.

Some of the tenants absolutely loved them and fought tooth and nail to keep their home and many years of family memories that went with them.

The prefabs originally had a very short 10 year design life - but if looked after they were fine.

Some are still dotted around I believe and much loved by the occupiers - 50 years after they were erected.

The Pre-Fab Four

A blast from the past

Last Modified By montechoro at 22 Apr 2010 - 10:33 AM Helpful Post! This post was flagged as helpful
KarenFB
KarenFB Junior Gallery Team 84271 forum postsKarenFB vcard England163 Constructive Critique Points
22 Apr 2010 - 12:10 PM

Thanks for the newspaper report - it made interesting reading!

Photogeek
Photogeek  9605 forum posts Wales6 Constructive Critique Points
22 Apr 2010 - 12:40 PM

My Aunt still lives in a prefab . . . . but then that's the valleys for you Tongue

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