Take your photography to the next level and beyond...

  • NEWS
  • REVIEWS
  • INSPIRATION
  • COMMUNITY
  • COMPETITIONS

Why not join for free today?

Join for Free

Your total photography experience starts here


PRIZES GALORE! Enter The ePHOTOzine Exclusive Christmas Prize Draw; Over £10,000 Worth of Prizes! Plus A Gift For Everybody On Christmas Day!

Tiff or PSD?


canonfan46 5 1.1k United Kingdom
17 Jan 2013 8:41PM
Hi all, I'm back again.
I am in the process of reviewing my complete work flow using LR4 and CS6.

I have been looking at my preferences in LR and was wondering about the best file format and Colour Space to use between the two programs.
My current settings in "External Editing" are:-
Format = TIFF
Colour Space = Prophoto RGB
Bit Depth = 16 bits
Resolution = 240
I dont know enough about these to have a preference of one over the other, so I am relying on advice from members on here.

My system is Vostro 470, 64bit, 8gb RAM, on Windows 7 (if that makes a diff)
I also use an external drive for storing my images.

Any advice would be appreciated.

John

Join ePHOTOzine for free and remove these adverts.

justin c 11 4.6k 36 England
17 Jan 2013 9:07PM
Adobe RGB would be my choice for working space.

I convert Raw images to tif. Then when I've finished doing any editing in Photoshop, I save them as 16 bit unflattened PSD files. I don't think they're is an awful lot of difference between saving for tif or psd, both formats will keep any adjustment layers intact (if desired). I believe the file size may be slightly smaller with a psd file compared to tif. The reason I use the above procedure is because I can see at a glance that a tif file represents an unedited (but Raw converted) file and a psd file represents a completed, final, master file. One disadvantage of this method is that an unflattened 16bit psd file is pretty large and takes up a fair bit of storage space, but saying that, modern hard drives are large and relatively inexpensive so it's not a major issue. Another method which I guess would work well is just using Lightroom to do all the editing and making virtual copies if needed, instead of physically creating another file.
GlennH 9 1.9k 1 France
18 Jan 2013 1:48AM
Your current settings seem to make a lot of sense for bouncing files around between the two programs, John, otherwise you'd potentially lose data merely through translation (ProPhoto RGB and 16-bit always go hand-in-hand when editing). The colour space you eventually use for exporting might be a different thing, depending on the potential use you have for your own files. With any given file in Lightroom 4 you can see what colours are going to be clipped in your proposed output (export) colour space using the destination gamut warning in softproofing. Anything highlighted by that will lose detail in the transition.
puertouk 3 1.1k 17 United Kingdom
18 Jan 2013 10:14AM
From what I´ve seen and read regarding Lightroom and PS6, the best method is PSD. Its Adobe´s own, so it makes sense to use it. RGB, if you have the printer set up for that or if you are getting them printed at a lab, Rsgb. If you are using your images for internet, use 72 and for printing 300.
Stephen
thewilliam 6 4.8k
18 Jan 2013 10:41AM
We use sRGB for social photography and ARGB for commercial.
GlennH 9 1.9k 1 France
18 Jan 2013 10:44AM

Quote: Its Adobe´s own, so it makes sense to use it


That's usually the precise reason why people advise against using it; it's an undocumented proprietary file format that offers few or no advantages over the near-universal TIFF file.
canonfan46 5 1.1k United Kingdom
18 Jan 2013 10:58AM
I think I stick with Prophoto RGB and TIFF. I dont know why other than I like the sound of GlennH's reasoning.


Quote:it makes sense to use it. RGB, if you have the printer set up for that


I am not sure what is meant by "set up". I use a Canon Pro9500 MK II printer with Permajet paper.
The only "set up" I use is Permajets own paper profile. Is there something I am missing in this area?
arhb e2
7 2.5k 68 United Kingdom
18 Jan 2013 12:38PM

Quote:Your current settings seem to make a lot of sense for bouncing files around between the two programs, John, otherwise you'd potentially lose data merely through translation (ProPhoto RGB and 16-bit always go hand-in-hand when editing). The colour space you eventually use for exporting might be a different thing, depending on the potential use you have for your own files. With any given file in Lightroom 4 you can see what colours are going to be clipped in your proposed output (export) colour space using the destination gamut warning in softproofing. Anything highlighted by that will lose detail in the transition.


I was unaware of the this Glenn, and have until now been using AdobeRGB for editing(8 and 16 bit), and converting to sRGB for web and some print labs when specified.
I went over to Luminous Landscape to get an overview of ProfotoRGB, and will move over this colourspace for my editing and processing.
GlennH 9 1.9k 1 France
18 Jan 2013 1:06PM
Complex subject. Stephen's advice is pretty sound when it comes to exporting raw files into converted images. Adobe RGB (mistakenly shortened to 'RGB' by some) is a fair choice for most inkjet printing, for the simple reason that only a relatively small proportion of high-end inkjet printers can make use of colour outside of the Adobe RGB gamut. For minilab prints there's almost no lab in the land that can deal with anything other than sRGB. So the main reasons for actually exporting to ProPhoto RGB would be to serve a printer capable of making use of the extra gamut, or to archive rendered images with the maximum amount of data preserved. For 'Edit in Photoshop' purposes, where you'll subsequently be bringing the picture back into Lightroom, it makes sense to me to preserve the data of the raw file by choosing ProPhoto RGB.
Nick_w e2
7 4.1k 99 England
18 Jan 2013 1:24PM
I now always use PSD, as I had problems with TIFF compatibility errors (was when adding a TIF generated from Photomatix to a layer stack. - it caused major issues and froze the PC for 3 hours, - even navigating to the folder froze the PC, I then had to save as PSD, then when I tried deleting the original TIFF it again froze the PC for 3 hours whilst the recycle bin emptied). Why didn't I delete and start again? well I'd spent 5 hours on an image (yes I know without saving).

Also with large files PSD is more stable (PSB even more so).

Sign In

You must be a member to leave a comment.

ePHOTOzine, the web's friendliest photography community.

Join For Free

Upload photos, chat with photographers, win prizes and much more.