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tiff v raw

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youmightlikethis
youmightlikethis e2 Member 121015 forum postsyoumightlikethis vcard Scotland
15 Nov 2013 - 8:43 PM

is raw better than tiff

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15 Nov 2013 - 8:43 PM

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Dann
Dann  1191 forum posts
15 Nov 2013 - 9:16 PM

Yes.

LesJD
LesJD  2146 forum posts Wales
15 Nov 2013 - 9:20 PM

Maybe

mikehit
mikehit  56555 forum posts United Kingdom10 Constructive Critique Points
15 Nov 2013 - 9:25 PM

For what purpose?
If you want to do major manipulation, the image is converted to TIFF anyway so it can't be that bad.

There is always a concern that the raw data may not be readable many years from now if the manufacturer goes bust or stops supporting legacy software, so some people convert all raw to DNG and some convert to TIFF as they are more standard codings.

Dave_Canon
15 Nov 2013 - 10:03 PM

A 16 bit TIFF file should be able to store any high quality rendering from a Raw file. However, the original Raw file (or a DNG version) is capable of different renderings whereas the TIFF file is fixed. As you edit a RAW file the editing changes are not immediately applied but only applied in a single process when finally rendered. This is much better than the sequential editing of a TIFF (or any other rendered file). If you edit a RAW file say pulling back some highlights to obtain more highlight detail, the entire rendering is recalculated.

However, though RAW files have their place, so do TIFF files. TIFF files can be sent directly for printing and is a universal open source format. It is also a non-destructive format and thus a good format for archiving. RAW files are particularly advantageous at the early stages of image processing when you need to edit the local or global tonal range to cope with dynamic range and contrast. TIFF is advantageous in the latter stages for multiple layers, cloning, printing and archiving so it is not a question of one or the other as they both have their place.

I f you capture in Raw, you will almost certain end up with a TIFF or PSD file after fully editing for archiving or converting to other output formats. I personally store both the original RAW file and the final TIFF (or PSD) file. I do not store JPEG versions for long as they can always be recreated when needed from the archived TIFF (or PSD) file.

Dave

gary_d
gary_d e2 Member 6539 forum postsgary_d vcard Wales13 Constructive Critique Points
15 Nov 2013 - 10:37 PM

''I f you capture in Raw, you will almost certain end up with a TIFF or PSD file after fully editing for archiving or converting to other output formats. I personally store both the original RAW file and the final TIFF (or PSD) file. I do not store JPEG versions for long as they can always be recreated when needed from the archived TIFF (or PSD) file.''




That makes sense.

MichaelMelb_AU
16 Nov 2013 - 3:51 AM

TIFF vs RAW. There is no vs actually. You either capture RAW or scan (capture with older cameras) to TIFF. While TIFF can be derived from RAW, reverse process is not possible. So something gets lost after all. Should be no accident that in their evolution process digital cameras forgone TIFF in favour of RAWWink

capto
capto e2 Member 21180 forum postscapto vcard United Kingdom6 Constructive Critique Points
16 Nov 2013 - 9:08 AM

The advantage of RAW or DNG is that any edits can be reversed at a later date. For special images it's always worth saving the Raw or DNG files.

indemnity
indemnity  6329 forum posts
16 Nov 2013 - 10:07 AM


Quote: TIFF vs RAW. There is no vs actually. You either capture RAW or scan (capture with older cameras) to TIFF. While TIFF can be derived from RAW, reverse process is not possible. So something gets lost after all. Should be no accident that in their evolution process digital cameras forgone TIFF in favour of RAWWink

Not true. I use a digital back, it only records IIQ Raw or TIFF.

Dave gives best explanation imho.

Dann
Dann  1191 forum posts
16 Nov 2013 - 2:34 PM


Quote: There is no vs actually.

Ahem.

My camera offers a TIFF shooting option. Tongue

GeorgeBuchan
16 Nov 2013 - 6:28 PM

Raw if you know how to edit them.

Mozzytheboy
Mozzytheboy e2 Member 4550 forum postsMozzytheboy vcard United Kingdom3 Constructive Critique Points
16 Nov 2013 - 7:40 PM

YMLT

Yes undoubtedly! For me I go RAW through PSD in PSE then when I'm ready I will save to TIFF. I'll open said TIFF and save finally to JPEG if wishing to use the image online.

Mozzy

MichaelMelb_AU
16 Nov 2013 - 8:39 PM


Quote: TIFF vs RAW. There is no vs actually. You either capture RAW or scan (capture with older cameras) to TIFF. While TIFF can be derived from RAW, reverse process is not possible. So something gets lost after all. Should be no accident that in their evolution process digital cameras forgone TIFF in favour of RAWWink

Not true. I use a digital back, it only records IIQ Raw or TIFF.
...

I use Canon scanner, it gives TIFF as well, so what? But when I process RAW from my digital camera to TIFF in Lightroom to export into Paintshop - I have white balance and exposure compensation fixed permanently. The same happens when TIFF from your digital back becomes TIFF from image editor. Take time to read and understand this great article from Bob Atkins.

MichaelMelb_AU
16 Nov 2013 - 8:55 PM

And if you or anyone else means possibility of choice between RAW and TIFF on digital backs and other exotic things - well, there's everything in this world. I, for example, can change file type extention of my Canon's .CR2 to .TIFF by the means of computer in a second by simply renaming itWink

Last Modified By MichaelMelb_AU at 16 Nov 2013 - 8:57 PM
indemnity
indemnity  6329 forum posts
17 Nov 2013 - 12:55 AM

Not going to bother...sigh.

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