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Time for a whole new PC....Help!

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ChrisJD
ChrisJD  496 forum posts Scotland
9 Dec 2013 - 9:28 PM

It really does help guys, mucho thanks one and all.

Best wishes
Chris

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9 Dec 2013 - 9:28 PM

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CathR
CathR  7139 forum posts United Kingdom563 Constructive Critique Points
10 Dec 2013 - 10:21 AM

Another vote for PCSpecialist. I took a deep breath and tried them as I couldn't get the spec I wanted from any of the major suppliers. Believe me, nobody is as dumb as me when it comes to these things, but I managed it and would really recommend PCSpecialist. What you could do is look at their forums where people are checking their specs and see if you can find a spec which is broadly similar to your needs. I found PC Specialist more user friendly for the non-geek than Overclockers.

Good luck

Catherine

andygeol
andygeol  1 United Kingdom
12 Dec 2013 - 12:49 PM

Good advice from the above. A word of caution re Internet security. Having spent days getting rid of norton, I moved to McAfee---thought I was ok until constant series of browser hijackers that McA was not picking up. Took some advice from IT security professional and he recommended Kaspersky. Sits and works very effectively in the background and doesn't hog resources (check program manager for processes if you don't believe me)

Much happier PC now
Andy

Railcam
Railcam  8480 forum posts Scotland
12 Dec 2013 - 1:26 PM


Quote: Having spent days getting rid of norton, I moved to McAfee

"Out of the frying pan into the fire" comes to mind. Norton and McAfee are both space hogs. You have made a good move going to Kaspersky.

robdebank
robdebank e2 Member 5164 forum postsrobdebank vcard United Kingdom
12 Dec 2013 - 2:21 PM

As Chris says above, it's just as easy to get and off the shelf PC from any number of suppliers. At the same price or even less than you can buy the component parts. And it comes with a warranty and some technical support.

In the past I've bought a pre-clocked motherboard from Overclockers, complete with processor, fan and matched memory for less than buying the bits separately. This is then installed in a Coolermaster case with a stabilised 700w or more power supply ( 70 - 110 in itself )

If you've never built your own PC from scratch before, then think about it before you jump in the deep end. I've been building my own for over 20 years and whilst it's great fun and very satisfying, it's not without it's pitfalls. If you have a running PC whilst you're building the new one, then that relieves some of the potential headache.


Quote: a decent monitor that won't need too much in the way of frequent calibration

All monitors should be calibrated on a weekly basis, if you are serious about colour matching with a good photo printer and paper with ICC profiles.

Personally, Ive had lots of different monitors and I currently run 2 Hazro 27 IPS screens resolution 2560x1440 the quality is simply amazing. These were from Overclockers and have a 3 year warranty. Im sure there are other makes out there, which are just as good.

As for the hardware there is so much to choose from. As noted in a previous thread, Macs now run identical Intel processors and are no better than any Windows based PC, with the same spec. Dont get me wrong - they are lovely machines, but way overpriced. You can get 2 PCs for the price of one Mac.

As for hard drives whatever you do go for an SSD boot drive, preferably with a conventional data drive ( min. 1TB ) An SSD is the biggest single performance boost you will ever get in a machine. More than the fastest memory or 400 graphics card upgrade can ever give you.

Good luck.

ChrisJD
ChrisJD  496 forum posts Scotland
13 Dec 2013 - 7:10 PM

OK, I've checked all of the websites above and I'm seriously confused. I'm just not able to get my head around what I really need. Many of the "build-your-own" PC's seem to have very near identical components and I'm just not PC-savvy enough to appreciate the differences. I don't mind calling the companies but I'm pretty lost so when they ask "do you need a blah blah" they may as well be asking if I want the case filled with cement!

Big favour request! Could someone please scribble up a quick list of what I need based on my original post. Budget around 1000-1100. A big tube of smarties awaits the most helpful reply!

THANK YOU!

KenTaylor
KenTaylor e2 Member 102983 forum postsKenTaylor vcard United Kingdom2 Constructive Critique Points
14 Dec 2013 - 10:37 PM

You will end up with list after list taking you right back to where you came in.
SSD with a decent graphic card.
As you need it for photography it would be so easy to go through the roof where a professional needs top spec hardware, very different from wanting it.
PC Specialist are friendly enough to advise you on a machine with plenty of power easily meeting your budget.

billeden
billeden  7 United Kingdom
17 Dec 2013 - 4:40 PM

I will vouch for Pc specialist, had my pc for a couple of years now and no problems, but if I was you I would get rid of all purchased anti virus, as it is so much bloatware, and use avast free version. There is a purchased version if you want it. I have never ever purchased any virus protection software since I started using pc's (win 95 thru to win 7 now) and always used free antivirus without any problems. Same with spyware / malware.
Will you be playing many up to date games, if not then you dont need and upto date graphics card for half of your budget. Tell the company you eventually use, what the machine is going to be used for eg mostly photo processing and storage, lots of it and they will put you right.
Plus for that budget you will prob get a decent monitor too if you need it.

Hope you find what you are after.
Bill

KenTaylor
KenTaylor e2 Member 102983 forum postsKenTaylor vcard United Kingdom2 Constructive Critique Points
17 Dec 2013 - 9:45 PM


Quote: and always used free antivirus without any problems. Same with spyware / malware.

I can add that you have been shall we say fortunate. I would be cautious with free internet security.
Some Infection can be missed with the freebies as the search is limited. If you use online banking or other financial transactions then any compromise may not be acceptable by the bank. Rather like seat belts in a car.

Last Modified By KenTaylor at 17 Dec 2013 - 9:46 PM
Jestertheclown
17 Dec 2013 - 9:55 PM


Quote: I can add that you have been shall we say been fortunate. I would be cautious with free internet security.
Some Infection can be missed with the freebies as the search is limited. If you use online banking or other financial transactions then any compromise may not be acceptable by the bank. Rather like seat belts in a car.


I've never paid for anti-virus/malware software and in many years of using a PC, I've only had one really impressive attack. I can't recall its name but it was doing the rounds and just about noting could stop it.
On the other hand, at the school where I used to work, they insisted, as you do, on using the paid for stuff; believing it to be more secure and had Kaspersky installed.
They were hit by one thing after another and eventually decided to ditch Kaspersky and go for Macafee instead.
If anything, that made things worse.
Finally someone suggested the free version of Avast, which they grudgingly installed, expecting the worst.
It turned out to be the most effective of the lot.
I'm not sure what you mean re.the bank. I wouldn't have thought that your details were likely to be stolen by a virus and A/V software won't keep a hacker at bay.

Last Modified By Jestertheclown at 17 Dec 2013 - 9:57 PM
billeden
billeden  7 United Kingdom
18 Dec 2013 - 3:27 PM


Quote: I can add that you have been shall we say fortunate. I would be cautious with free internet security.
Some Infection can be missed with the freebies as the search is limited. If you use online banking or other financial transactions then any compromise may not be acceptable by the bank. Rather like seat belts in a car.

All anti virus and malware software can miss infections, you need to keep them upto date. Mcaffee, and norton, to name a couple stuff a lot of useless stuff onto your computer that is not needed, Avast free and purchased is nowhere as bloated as the big company ones pushed along with new pc's. I do use online banking and the security for that is in the banks hands not mine!!

To original OP, as long as you tell the computer supplier / manufacturer what you wish to do they should (if they are any good) sell you something that will last you without having to upgrade any major components for a good couple of years if not more.

chrs
Bill

oldblokeh
oldblokeh  3836 forum posts United Kingdom
18 Dec 2013 - 3:44 PM

I just had to spend two hours cleaning up a neighbour's PC from stuff that up-to-date Norton missed.

billeden
billeden  7 United Kingdom
18 Dec 2013 - 4:57 PM


Quote: I just had to spend two hours cleaning up a neighbour's PC from stuff that up-to-date Norton missed.

2 hours you will never get back!, hope you got more than a cup of teaWink

Robert_Malcolm
19 Dec 2013 - 10:54 PM

If this isn't too late, consider PC Specialist (pcspecialist.co.uk) which is where I 'built' and bought my most recent acquisition. Quad i7 with 32GB ram and NVidia GTX760, dual DVD/Bluray writers and no card reader (wasn't enough space in the case so I opted for external) and Win 7 was 1k ex vat. I use it for video editing/authoring (up to 3 V/A tracks, 2 V-only and 3 Audio) and it handles everything I throw at it. I still use Adobe Design Suite on the old Dell XPS because I don't want to slow the new system down. 2TB mirror RAID internal and 3TB external drives keep everything in place.

Alternative idea is to buy a cheaper system and install all of your less-used software onto it, giving you the option of completely clearing out your primary editing system apart from essentials. Either way you should get a speed boost.

Only downside is that you end up with multiple monitors (I have 3) and keyboards/mice (2) which occasionally cause frustration and space difficulties. My desk is 8ft wide and still gets crammed, especially when I pull out a graphics tablet.

Happy hunting.

Dowie
Dowie  1 United Kingdom4 Constructive Critique Points
19 Dec 2013 - 11:20 PM

Get a mac, don't waste time and money on a PC,

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