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To Snap or not to Snap ?


stevenb e2
11 260 6 England
9 Nov 2012 1:48PM
I don't like the term snapper, to me it says something you haven't put much thought or effort into the job .


Bill

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digicammad 11 22.0k 37 United Kingdom
9 Nov 2012 2:37PM
I'd rather be called a snapper than a slapper
digicammad 11 22.0k 37 United Kingdom
9 Nov 2012 2:42PM
To be honest I don't think it is sufficiently important to get wound up about. I know what I am and if non-photographers don't understand the effort which has potentially gone into a shot then so be it. It can actually make for an interesting conversation as you enlighten them.

Life is too short to be upset.
User_Removed 5 4.6k 1 Scotland
9 Nov 2012 3:29PM

Quote:And if you were a carpenter and someone called you "a chippie" (you aren't a fish shop)... Or an electrician and were called a "sparks" (unless you were not a good electrician)..... Or a police officer and were called "a copper" (you're not made of metal, nor are you a metal cooking vessel) .... And so on.
We shouldn't be too precious unless the phrase is intended as an insult. Personally, I hate the term "tog", but it seems to be in common usage by people who can't be bothered to say or write "photographer".

On the other hand, I wouldn't like to be someone who herds cattle for a living and be called a "cowpoke". For one thing, it's slanderous, and for another, I'm sure you can be arrested for that sort of thing these days....

Tongue

Nick



Yes - "Snap" has a long and honourable heritage as a popular term for a photograph. I can remember folk in the 1940s passing round their "holiday snaps".

Like Nick, I find the term "tog" less acceptable.

But hey - in a country comprised of Taffs, Jocks, Paddies and Anglos, maybe we should not be too precious about nicknames.
Gaucho e2
12 2.4k 2 United Kingdom
9 Nov 2012 4:50PM
Not to mention the Argies Smile
Paul Morgan e2
13 16.1k 6 England
9 Nov 2012 6:03PM

Quote:I don't like the term snapper, to me it says something you haven't put much thought or effort into the job


Well if you can`t take a decent snap, your not much of a photographer Smile
redsnappa 12 2.0k United Kingdom
9 Nov 2012 6:37PM

Quote:If you were a socialist as well would you be a 'red snapper'?

Yep definitely, I socialise as well as taking pix
Paul_Anthony 2 385 4 Wales
9 Nov 2012 6:57PM

Quote:I'd reserve the term "photographer" for somebody who has proven skill or qualifications in photography.

Lesser mortals are "snappers".



I am guessing that your tongue is firmly in your cheek here...

If not, then what an absolutely ridiculous statement. IMO anybody taking photographs with absolutely any kind of recording device is a photographer. I have been working as a professional photographer for seven years now and have no problem what so ever with being called a snapper. As long as I am producing the goods and keeping my clients happy they can call me anything they want.

The only thing I do abject to being called or labeled as is a "Vulgar Professional" by other professional photographers. Just because I have studied photography, gained experience and charge my clients for my work does not make me Vulgar.

Regards

Paul
SlowSong e2
6 4.8k 29 England
9 Nov 2012 7:37PM
Double Tog - it's all in the title . Grin
thewilliam 6 4.8k
9 Nov 2012 9:23PM
Some years back, when I was using a long lens on a monopod, some idiot asked what had happened to the other two legs. I replied that as a good communist, I'd shared the tripod with a couple of less fortunate colleagues. When he expressed some scepticism, I pointed out that the lens had a red filter fitted.
mixipix 2 12 Australia
14 Nov 2012 2:08AM
I'm with you Pulsar69. I dislike the term immensely. I worked as a press photographer for many years and won many awards, and think that journalists/reporters use the term to discredit the photographer and to direct attention back onto themselves. Over the years I noticed that what was once called reporters began calling themselves journalists and upped the use of the term 'snapper'.
When I objected to them using the term, they quickly labeled me as "precious" and having "no sense of humour", but then quickly objected and became agitated when I introduced them as "my scribbler". What's good for the goose...........
StrayCat e2
10 15.5k 2 Canada
14 Nov 2012 3:32AM
The worst thing one can do to people who try to belittle others ....is to ignore them. The moment they get a rise out of you, you're hooked.

What would you do in this case; I was a part of the pilot group, about 3500, of a large intl airline, we were in hot water financially. The company's new President asked for concessions from the Unions. We gave twice as much as all the other unions combined, 100s of millions. Shortly thereafter, the President was on a live talk show with an audience; he said; why do we need two pilots on our airplanes? .....because an IQ of 100 is required to fly one. (big laugh) I talked to him the next day, and he said it was a joke, relax. It was a stupid remark at a terrble time in our companies history, but wtf can you do?

Denny
779HOB 2 1.1k United Kingdom
14 Nov 2012 6:10AM

Quote:when I introduced them as "my scribbler".


I like that!
rhol2 e2
3 320 1 United Kingdom
14 Nov 2012 8:28AM
Surely,professional photographers referring to each other as "snappers",in the UK at least, are just following the British tradition of modesty.. or even self deprecation, which may be unfamiliar to some of the posters here.
thewilliam 6 4.8k
14 Nov 2012 10:10AM

Quote:Surely,professional photographers referring to each other as "snappers",in the UK at least, are just following the British tradition of modesty.. or even self deprecation, which may be unfamiliar to some of the posters here.


Many foreigners do seem to get confused when "not bad" means very good and "bloody marvelous" means bad.

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