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ErictheViking
ErictheViking e2 Member 1124 forum postsErictheViking vcard Scotland102 Constructive Critique Points
11 Dec 2012 - 12:18 PM


Quote: Can we be 100% sure that this was the reason the nurse decided to end her life, and not for some other reason?

The answer to this is of course no, but as an employee of the NHS I can only guess the pressures placed on all the staff will the care of a Royal VIP and I don't believe the NHS report that they were supporting the nurse after the prank. They would be looking for were the blame can go and making sure all managerial a*rses were covered.

All pranks like this will have consequences and this nurses culture made the humiliation of her slip in protocol a shame she found difficult to come to terms with the whole series of events contributed to this woman feeling she could live no longer ... her culture, the pressure of work, possible pressures at home and the blame placed on her for the mistake she made at a time in the day when she was about to end her shift and go home to bed.

My thoughts are with the husband and children who have lost an important part of their lives, not with the juveniles (by this I mean people with influence who behave like children) who seem to be guiding our younger generation through their mindless / thoughtless actions with no consideration of the consequences.

Eric Sad

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11 Dec 2012 - 12:18 PM

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KenTaylor
KenTaylor e2 Member 102980 forum postsKenTaylor vcard United Kingdom2 Constructive Critique Points
11 Dec 2012 - 12:49 PM


Quote: I don't believe the NHS report that they were supporting the nurse after the prank. They would be looking for were the blame can go and making sure all managerial a*rses were covered.

It was a high ranking private hospital that has nothing to do with the NHS.

mrswoolybill
mrswoolybill Critique Team 7440 forum postsmrswoolybill vcard United Kingdom1028 Constructive Critique Points
11 Dec 2012 - 1:21 PM


Quote: All pranks like this will have consequences

Precisely, and whilst pranks have always existed, in the past they were observed by a handful of people not tens of millions worldwide.

Quote: this nurse's culture made the humiliation of her slip in protocol a shame she found difficult to come to terms with

That will be for the inquest to determine. But for someone with a conscientious, professional attitude, to be tricked into compromising patient confidentiality would be deeply humiliating. I do suspect that the broadcasters in question would not be able to understand such professionalism.

Last Modified By mrswoolybill at 11 Dec 2012 - 1:23 PM
paulcookphotography

For the last time, she wasn't tricked into anything. She answered a call, and forwarded it to a nursing station where another nurse took over the call.

How that can be deemed humiliating I'm not sure. We simply don't know how she felt before and after the call. For all we know, the prank may have gad nothing to do with it

ErictheViking
ErictheViking e2 Member 1124 forum postsErictheViking vcard Scotland102 Constructive Critique Points
11 Dec 2012 - 1:50 PM


Quote: Brady: When you weren't hung up on - and, let's be honest, you thought it was a coup at the time - were you quite shocked that you even got that far to talk to the nurse beside Princess Kate?


Quote: THE nurse who took a prank call from two Australian DJs asking about the pregnant Duchess of Cambridge has been found dead this morning.
Mum-of-two Jacintha Saldanha, 46, is believed to have committed suicide as police are not treating the death as suspicious.
Read more: http://www.thesun.co.uk/sol/homepage/news/4686549/tragedy-as-woman-who-answered-...


Paul these quotes clearly state Jacintha Saldanha was the nurse who spoke to the DJ's and not just a receptionist. Your can listen to the call on You Tube and hear the call being transferred from the switch board to the ward and the nurse speaking.
And yes your right Ken it is a private hospital but from my experience with private and NHS hospitals the managers are all the same.

Eric.

paulcookphotography

It has been previously reported that she was the nurse who answered the call initially, and not the nurse who divulged information. Have a look back though the thread and at the transcript (she was referred to as receptionist in this, but we now know she too was a nurse)

mikehit
mikehit  56555 forum posts United Kingdom10 Constructive Critique Points
11 Dec 2012 - 2:28 PM


Quote:

Paul these quotes clearly state Jacintha Saldanha was the nurse who spoke to the DJ's and not just a receptionist. Your can listen to the call on You Tube and hear the call being transferred from the switch board to the ward and the nurse speaking.
And yes your right Ken it is a private hospital but from my experience with private and NHS hospitals the managers are all the same.

Eric.

From the Independent:


Quote: Jacintha Saldanha, 46, a nurse at the King Edward VII's Hospital in central London, answered the call at 5.30am on Tuesday from the Sydney-based 2Day FM station, whose DJs pretended to be the Queen and Prince Charles. Ms Saldanha put them through to a colleague who provided details of the Duchess's condition.

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/home-news/nurse-jacintha-saldanha-who-took-...

Last Modified By mikehit at 11 Dec 2012 - 2:29 PM
paulcookphotography

It also says as much (although granted not as clearly) in the link to the Sun article that Eric provided himself

DOGSBODY
DOGSBODY  61432 forum posts England30 Constructive Critique Points
11 Dec 2012 - 3:50 PM

About a month ago I saw (or read) somewhere that practical jokes are never funny and that the person who is the butt of the joke always gets hurt in some way.

The outcome in this case was certainly not predictable but, perhaps, we should all think twice about the jokes we play on others.

paulcookphotography

The same could be said about all forms of jokes, humour and comedy. Usually there is some individual or situation that's the subject and others laugh at. Usually, humour and comedy is based around its audience and whether they would either get the joke or if it would be deemed offensive.

Now it's very apparent many find the prank offensive and in bad taste, but these people are not (in the majority) the audience of the radio show. Had the nurse not taken her life, it's quite likely the prank would be largely forgotten by now, and no doubt would not have been given as much media coverage and 'angry mob' attention. That's not to say people shouldn't be offended, but that they have to remember they are reacting to the media coverage and what little information has been given.

The prank was never intended to cause offense or indeed expected to result in what appears to have happened. Ask yourself seriously, if the prank hasn't turned out as it did and you heard a radio show badly mimicking accents, pretending to be corgis and the queen asking Charlie for a lift, would you think it was funny/silly, turn it off, or get the pitchforks and torches ready?

monstersnowman
11 Dec 2012 - 4:53 PM


Quote: About a month ago I saw (or read) somewhere that practical jokes are never funny and that the person who is the butt of the joke always gets hurt in some way.

Sad oh dear .. It's not a world I want to live in.

Sooty_1
Sooty_1 Critique Team 41208 forum posts United Kingdom198 Constructive Critique Points
12 Dec 2012 - 12:24 AM

I find it hard to believe that anyone in the hospital wasn't briefed to deflect all calls. Who in their right mind would think HM would telephone at that time of the morning? And who in their right mind would not be suspicious that any call could be an attempt to gain inside information? Think press, terrorist, stalker, whatever you like, the fact remains that with such a high profile guest you would require absolute proof of identity first.

That said, the pair that made the call are not to blame for the way it turned out. I'll-advised? Not really, everyone laughs at Bart Simpson's prank calls, and it happens on radio one all the time, as on many other radio stations.

"I need'a Seymour Butts in here..."

Nick

Paul Morgan
Paul Morgan e2 Member 1315487 forum postsPaul Morgan vcard England6 Constructive Critique Points
12 Dec 2012 - 1:44 AM


Quote: I find it hard to believe that anyone in the hospital wasn't briefed to deflect all calls

I`m so pleased none of my calls got deflected when my son was in surgery Smile

paulcookphotography

Interesting comments on the BBC News website

On a sidenote, i guess April Fools Day will soon be banned. Alongside cultural and religious festivals like Christmas, Easter, Hallowe'en, etc in case it offends anyone (although recent reports of schools banning some festivities kinda indicates we are already in the way to that)

Sad days indeed

paulcookphotography


Quote: I`m so pleased none of my calls got deflected when my son was in surgery Smile

Surely you would not have been deflected being his father? I think i know what you meant by this, but i would have thought a call from the queen would have gone directly to an appointed spokesperson, or through a royal official at least

When i was in hospital after a serious injury a lot of people were simply told that unless they were a close relative then information couldnt be given out. Similarly, when my daughter was born months premature, any info was given by myself or her mum. People understand that (for the most part).

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