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Triggering Studio Flash Remotely from Hotshoe Trigger

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    davidburleson
    davidburleson ePHOTOzine Staff 72337 forum postsdavidburleson vcard United Kingdom
    5 Aug 2010 - 4:34 PM

    Apologies for this novice question. I have a Pentax *ist D (i know, its old) which came with no manual. I want to trigger some lighting with a hotshoe trigger. It works in Auto, but when I go to Shutter Priority, it doesn't trigger. How can I get it to trigger in Shutter Priority?

    Thanks for help!

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    Pete
    Pete Site Moderator 1318442 forum postsPete vcard ePz Advertiser England96 Constructive Critique Points
    5 Aug 2010 - 4:58 PM

    You wouldn't use flash in shutter priority David. The camera will not know what the flash exposure will be so it would not set the correct aperture. This is only possible with TTL flash which normal studio lighting doesn't have. You need to switch to manual and set the shutter speed to 1/125sec (the flash sync speed) and then take a meter reading using a flash meter, or take a shot and see how oit looks on the screen. Try f/8 for starters. If the photo is too bright stop down to f/11 or f/16 if it's too dark open up to f/8 or f/5.6. If it's still not right move the flash closer to lighten or further from the subject to darken the photo..

    davidburleson
    davidburleson ePHOTOzine Staff 72337 forum postsdavidburleson vcard United Kingdom
    5 Aug 2010 - 5:00 PM

    Ah, thanks for that. I'll have a go tomorrow and see how it works.

    Freefall
    Freefall e2 Member 10675 forum postsFreefall vcard United Kingdom
    5 Aug 2010 - 5:06 PM

    Also, don't forget that changing the shutter speed won't have any effect on the exposure when using studio flash (it's very different to shooting with continuous lighting, daylight etc as the flash duration is usually much less than the synch speed)

    davidburleson
    davidburleson ePHOTOzine Staff 72337 forum postsdavidburleson vcard United Kingdom
    5 Aug 2010 - 8:25 PM

    thanks guys for the help. Im going to be shooting some portraits with a white background, probably going to convert to black n white, so any suggestions/tips are welcome!

    davidburleson
    davidburleson ePHOTOzine Staff 72337 forum postsdavidburleson vcard United Kingdom
    6 Aug 2010 - 9:17 AM

    I switched to aperture priority and now the flash fires which is great! Can I use aperture priority and still get decent shots?

    Pete
    Pete Site Moderator 1318442 forum postsPete vcard ePz Advertiser England96 Constructive Critique Points
    6 Aug 2010 - 9:41 AM

    No...you have to be in manual. In aperture priority the camera may think there's little light (especially if the modelling lights aren't bright) Because it's reading available light and not the flash that goes off when the shutter is fired. So the shutter speed will be slow, and you may get ambient light recorded on the shot which is not what you want. Read my previous explanation and work like that.

    Set the camera to M (manual)
    Set the shutter speed to 1/125sec (the flash sync speed)
    Take a shot at f/8 (see how it looks on the screen)
    If the photo is too bright stop down to f/11 or f/16 if it's too dark open up to f/8 or f/5.6.
    If it's still not right move the flash closer to lighten or further from the subject to darken the photo.

    davidburleson
    davidburleson ePHOTOzine Staff 72337 forum postsdavidburleson vcard United Kingdom
    6 Aug 2010 - 10:03 AM

    I had a feeling that was going to be the case. Manual mode it is then. Wish me luck, my first proper portrait shoot.

    doingthebobs
    10 Dec 2010 - 8:12 PM

    Of course a hand held flash meter would help as well.

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