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TV's portrayal of Photo Studio in Aylesbury

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Paul_Anthony
1 Mar 2013 - 8:55 PM

I had an RPS assessment in 2007, passed, paid for 2 years and never bothered with it again. Clients don't really care if you have letters after your name, all they really want to know is whether or not they like your photographs.

Paul.

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PeachLane
PeachLane  1
1 Mar 2013 - 9:10 PM

I know that the general public don't worry if you have letters or qualifications but the reason I want Rachel to do her licentiate is to expand and build on her photography skills and to challenge her. I think BIPP might be a good choice not least of all because the head quarters are about ten minutes from us.

thewilliam
1 Mar 2013 - 11:19 PM

The most valuable part of any qualification is the "working towards" because the process forces the applicant to look dispassionately at his/her work and really think about it. What you do with the letters is irrelevent.

You need to remember that the Licentiate is awarded for basic professional competence. She-who-must-be-obeyed gained her LMPA using images from her first two weddings and her LBIPP with images taken from regular customer sessions. A good practitioner should be delivering Licentiate standard or higher to every customer.

Ask the professional body to assign a mentor. This will save a lot of heartache by helping the applicant to eliminate the multiplicity of little things that can let the images down.

PeachLane
PeachLane  1
2 Mar 2013 - 6:42 AM

Great advice. Thank you The William.

She's excited to start. I want her to get a little out of her comfort zone. It's easy to get stuck in a rut when you're mainly in a studio. Hopefully this will help her learn and grow.

scottishphototours

A qualification is the worst thing in the world.....the customer sees you as a "clone" photographer, producing work that others have OK'd and awarding you a piece of paper to say you're one of "them". You can tell them all by their heavily vignetted images, their soul-less people shots and their over-saturated colours. In 10 years time their work will be as artificial looking as Velvia slides.

Plough your own furrow, develop a style (even from the seed of someone else's idea) and stand out from the crowd!!!

PeachLane
PeachLane  1
2 Mar 2013 - 5:37 PM

Since we appeared on The Fixer we've had a lot stick including a very challenging radio interview where the interviewer started off with the question 'You don't have any qualifications, what makes you think you can train your daughter? She'll be picking up all your bad habits' I wanted to ask him what bad habits he'd noticed but didn't have the nerve. He went on to say that his grandfather was a photographer and he trained with Lord Snowden. I should send my daughter to train with a top London photographer, he said. I was wondering if he'd actually watched the right program or he might have seen that I can't afford to do that.

But it got me thinking, maybe I should give her more opportunities to train and that's why I'm looking into it. It's not going to hurt.

CaptivePhotons
CaptivePhotons e2 Member 111546 forum postsCaptivePhotons vcard England2 Constructive Critique Points
2 Mar 2013 - 5:40 PM


Quote: A qualification is the worst thing in the world.....the customer sees you as a "clone" photographer!

I doubt that anybody who does not have an interest in photography even knows what the letters after a name stand for so they certainly wouldn't pigeon hole somebody with a qualification.



Quote: In 10 years time their work will be as artificial looking as Velvia slides

A lot of stuff will look dated in ten years, it doesn't mean people do not want it in the present.

Last Modified By CaptivePhotons at 2 Mar 2013 - 5:40 PM
Carabosse
Carabosse e2 Member 1139431 forum postsCarabosse vcard England269 Constructive Critique Points
2 Mar 2013 - 5:41 PM

The best training is taking photos - lots of them! Smile

Many of the world's most successful photographers do not have a single photographic qualification to their name. As has been said, plenty of amateurs have LRPS and the like.

Do you have a decent photography book collection?

Last Modified By Carabosse at 2 Mar 2013 - 5:43 PM
lemmy
lemmy  71869 forum posts United Kingdom
2 Mar 2013 - 5:48 PM


Quote: we've had a lot stick including a very challenging radio interview where the interviewer started off with the question 'You don't have any qualifications, what makes you think you can train your daughter? She'll be picking up all your bad habits'

That is a regular journalistic technique and not to be taken personally. The question is designed to get you to think about it and then refute it with your own (preferably) strongly held views. It has the effect of the interviewer putting their case or ideas over effectively.

Taking it personally is like a defendant taking taking the prosecuting lawyer's words personally. On another day, that self-same lawyer might be working for the defendant. Journalists cover many jobs a day.

As I said in a previous post, if these things are going to upset you so, why do you keep doing them? There is no law that says that you have to talk to the media. The most effective way is just to 'no thanks' politely and refuse to discuss the subject of a TV or radio appearance with the station. They won't be bothered, it's only business.

PeachLane
PeachLane  1
2 Mar 2013 - 6:19 PM

He was the first one to ask. I thought it would be a nice fluffy interview. But what the hey? I'm not 'putting myself through it' as you put it. I learn from my mistakes. Smile

thewilliam
3 Mar 2013 - 12:16 AM


Quote: A qualification is the worst thing in the world.....the customer sees you as a "clone" photographer, producing work that others have OK'd and awarding you a piece of paper to say you're one of "them". You can tell them all by their heavily vignetted images, their soul-less people shots and their over-saturated colours. In 10 years time their work will be as artificial looking as Velvia slides.

Plough your own furrow, develop a style (even from the seed of someone else's idea) and stand out from the crowd!!!

What utter rot! MPA, BIPP and RPS are not interested in creating clones and I speak as a trained judge and mentor. Indeed, for a Fellowship, the work MUST be individual.

jondf
jondf  82475 forum posts
3 Mar 2013 - 8:48 AM


Quote: Indeed, for a Fellowship, the work MUST be individual.

So what's new? Is there anything that can be produced photographically that hasn't been done already? The bulk of a successful studio's work will be bread and butter stuff like advertising, portraiture, weddings with specialisation in a couple of specific sub areas where ability and expertise really shine. It's also likely that the actual taking of photographs ends up coming secondary to the administration going on behind the scenes which is as much about selling yourself as is the sale of your product.

thewilliam
3 Mar 2013 - 10:01 AM

Has studio portraiture not changed in the last 150 years?

Carabosse
Carabosse e2 Member 1139431 forum postsCarabosse vcard England269 Constructive Critique Points
3 Mar 2013 - 10:12 AM


Quote: Has studio portraiture not changed in the last 150 years?

They don't use a head clamp any more! Grin

headclamp.jpg

jondf
jondf  82475 forum posts
3 Mar 2013 - 10:14 PM

Guffaw! Grin

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