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UK Photography Copyright revisited & sharing information


This morning I discovered this resource about UK Copyright regulations for UK based photographers.

Then I searched the EPZ forums and realised that there has not been much discussion here about photography copyright for quite a while (the latest thread I found was dated 2007, maybe there is a more current one that I couldn't find?).

The subject of Photography Copyright has come into my consciousness for a couple of reasons. This first is reading the online article "Digital thieves swipe your photos - and profit from them" from the Guardian (which is probably already known to you) and listening to the latest TWIP podcast I heard specific tips about US copyright and I wondered what a UK photographer's position might be?

What news, views, stories, concerns, information and/or insights do you have as a UK based photographer on the subject of Photography Copyright?

Thanks in advance


Stephen

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keith selmes
11 7.1k 1 United Kingdom
21 Jun 2008 11:12AM
Related topics crop up fairly often.
Image copying from websites - whether to watermark - whether to put work on the web at all - images being misused by clients outside the terms of contract, whether to sell copyright, pictures appearing in newspapers without attribution or with wrong attribution.
Recently the potential change in IP law in the USA came up again - the one where you can't enforce your copyright unless you've paid to register - although maybe its not that bad now they've rehashed it.
Sometimes people hotlink to images, causing excess bandwidth use.

A forum search to find these topics is difficult as they are often buried inside something else.
keith selmes
11 7.1k 1 United Kingdom
21 Jun 2008 11:21AM
A bit like this page
craigj e2
8 17
21 Jun 2008 4:49PM

Quote:Recently the potential change in IP law in the USA came up again - the one where you can't enforce your copyright unless you've paid to register - although maybe its not that bad now they've rehashed it.


The existing laws simply limit damages if your images are not registered with the US government. Unfortunately the latest revisions appear make it far worse than that. It now heavily shifts the advantage from the copyright holder to the infringer.

Unless you register your images with the proposed databases (at your expense) in the US, anyone can use them and if challenged merely need to demonstrate they took reasonable steps to locate the copyright holder (what those steps is not defined). If caught the publisher of the image only has to pay the copyright holder what they consider a fair fee for the use, that is the publisher determines what is a fair fee, not you the copyright holder. The publisher could simply look up the latest price for an image at one of the many microstock sites and pay you 1 dollar or so.

The global nature of the internet means this will affect non US photographers just as much as US photographers, arguably more so because they are less likely to have registered their images in the US.

Sites like epz could become rich pickings for unregistered images. It's not difficult to remove any copyright metadata from an image then make a hard copy print of a google search that the image was not found in and hey presto you have a legitimate orphaned image. There is also a fear that organisations might harvest the internet for unregistered images and create their own profit making orphans stock library from these images.

See here and here

If you value your copyright I suggest people add their name to the petition here .

Craig.
keith selmes
11 7.1k 1 United Kingdom
21 Jun 2008 5:26PM

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