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Using Hotshoe Flash - Advice please

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    webby962
    webby962  8128 forum posts United Kingdom1 Constructive Critique Points
    31 Aug 2010 - 9:30 AM

    OK, here is my problem. I have been shooting outdoors for a few years, and think I understand how my camera works, and more importantly, what I need to do to get a sharp and well lit shot in most instances. I have just started shooting in studios, and although I don't profess to be any good, I do believe I understand the technical stuff enough to get a well lit shot that is sharp.
    For outdoor and studio I only use the AV, Tv and M settings as appropriate.

    I have now purchased a Canon Speedlite, and would like the skill to be able to use this when indoors at events etc..
    I have had a play around with it, and have got results using the different modes.
    AV on camera, Speedlite on ETTL gives me well exposed by blurred shots (clearly shutter speed way to low.)
    TV on camera (1/80th), speedlite on ETTL gives me well exposed subject, and sharp. (But aperture flashes at 2.8)
    M on camera (1/100th and F8 and ISO100) gives underexposed shot that is sharp.
    M on camera (1/100th, F8 and ISO400) gives better exposure and sharp.
    For me the answer looks like use Tv and the slowest shutter speed that gives sharp results, but is this the best way?

    For the experts out there, what is the best settings to have when shooting indoors at events?
    And are there any simple tutorials for novice Flashgun users out there?


    (PS my set up is a Canon EOS30D, Speedlite 580EXII, Sigma 24-70mm F2.8 EX DG lens)

    Sorry if this is a bone question Grin

    Rgds

    Adie

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    31 Aug 2010 - 9:30 AM

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    timbo
    timbo  11591 forum posts United Kingdom
    31 Aug 2010 - 10:13 AM

    in studio use your camera on manual. depending on what type of image you are after you can use any shutter speed up to the max sync.
    You will find that getting the flash off camera will improve your images ten fold. Google strobist and there is world of speedlight goodness out there for you. Beware; it's very addictive.

    webby962
    webby962  8128 forum posts United Kingdom1 Constructive Critique Points
    31 Aug 2010 - 10:20 AM

    Thanks, fully understand about studio work, and where to light etc... It's the settings for indoor shoots at events, or people at work etc... that I'm needing help on.
    But I will google stobist, cheers Grin

    Rgds

    Adie

    SosFM
    SosFM  581 forum posts United Kingdom1 Constructive Critique Points
    31 Aug 2010 - 1:07 PM

    Have a look at this guys website it is full of invaluable information for both Canon and Nikon users. I also suggest buying his book (via his website or Amazon in the UK do it as well). It is well written but in easy to understand terms. I am working through it at the moment and find it a tremendous help. Also anything you do not understand you can post questions on his website and he WILL answer you back via the website. Have a look, I promise its worth it.http://neilvn.com/tangents/flash-photography-techniques/

    Helpful Post! This post was flagged as helpful
    webby962
    webby962  8128 forum posts United Kingdom1 Constructive Critique Points
    31 Aug 2010 - 8:56 PM

    thanks, very helpful Grin

    duratorque
    duratorque  11412 forum posts United Kingdom
    2 Sep 2010 - 12:31 PM

    I would shoot in M mode (leave flash on eTTL), set ISO to 400-800, shutter to 1/60s and use f4 or 5.6. If the ambient light level is low, you can get away with very low shutter speed as long as you do not use very long lens. You can adjust DOF by varying the aperture. You should be able to capture a good level of ambient light. I normally bounce my light with a white reflector and never use bare flash.

    Last Modified By duratorque at 2 Sep 2010 - 12:32 PM Helpful Post! This post was flagged as helpful
    webby962
    webby962  8128 forum posts United Kingdom1 Constructive Critique Points
    3 Sep 2010 - 3:29 PM

    Thanks

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