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    eddie1
    eddie1 e2 Member 2eddie1 vcard United Kingdom
    11 May 2012 - 5:53 AM

    Anyone tell me what filter i need to give my waterfalls that soft effect. i have an nd4,8,and 12, but they are only cheap ones and i cant seem to get the right effect.help.

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    StrayCat
    StrayCat e2 Member 1014852 forum postsStrayCat vcard Canada2 Constructive Critique Points
    11 May 2012 - 6:19 AM

    Either of those filters should work. What I would suggest is at first try the #4, unless it's bright sunny conditions, then use 8 or 12. Select aperture priority and set a high number (small aperture) like 16 or 22. This should give you a slow enough shutter speed to get the blurred effect. Also, you must use a tripod and remote release or the camera's timer release.

    Good LuckGrin

    Last Modified By StrayCat at 11 May 2012 - 6:21 AM
    mattw
    mattw  105189 forum posts United Kingdom10 Constructive Critique Points
    11 May 2012 - 8:39 AM

    Its all about using a slow shutter speed - so if you go late afternoon on a dull, overcast day, chances are you will not need a filter at all.

    You want to experiment with exposures between 0.5 seconds to 2 seconds

    I would start by setting the ISO as low as possible, and stop down the aperture to around F11 to F13. If you do need to add a filter to further slow the shutter speed, then the one I recommend for waterfalls is a Polariser, which will also allow you to control the reflections on the water

    dangertaylor
    30 May 2012 - 11:17 PM

    polariser + a longer shutter speed (1/8 or slower, generally)
    a tripod will be needed, or a VERY stable spot for the camera, as well as a remote (or you can use the auto timer)

    User_Removed
    31 May 2012 - 6:29 AM


    Quote: Its all about using a slow shutter speed - so if you go late afternoon on a dull, overcast day, chances are you will not need a filter at all.

    You want to experiment with exposures between 0.5 seconds to 2 seconds



    It rather depends upon the speed/volume of the waterfall.

    With a heavy flow, speeds of 1/15th - 1/8th will do nicely. If it is more of a trickle than a full-blown fall, then around 1/4 or 1/2 may be needed.

    But it also depends upon the effect that you want. If you want a solid flow of "milk" with no sparkle, then an even slower shutter speed may be required. Personally, I don't like that although it was a popular fad a few years ago.

    As emphasised several times in the thread, a tripod is a prerequisite.

    Use Aperture Priority (or Manual) and set the aperture to what you want (f/11 or f/16 is good) and then adjust ISO downwards and/or add ND or CPL filter to achieve the shutter speed you are looking for. It may be (reading between the lines) that you have stuck on an ND filter but left the camera on an auto exposure mode that has resulted in it trying to find a compromise without slowing the shutter enough.

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