Login or Join Now

Upload your photos, chat, win prizes and much more

Username:
Password:
Remember Me

Can't Access your Account?

New to ePHOTOzine? Join ePHOTOzine for free!

Like 0

Wedding venues

Join Now

Join ePHOTOzine, the friendliest photography community.

Upload photos, chat with photographers, win prizes and much more for free!

55% OFF new PortraitPro 12 - use code EPHZROS414.
monkeygrip
16 Sep 2012 - 1:18 PM

At least once a week someone will post a question about shooting weddings on this forum and the answers always ask about the venue to suggest appropriate equipment needed to produce the best results.

I have shot weddings all over the country in churches, hotels, castles to name a few and the one thing that is constant with the vast majority of them is that little or no consideration is given to the photographer.

A few examples,

Everyone seems to get married in the dark.
There is almost always a badly placed mirror or picture frame behind the registry signing desk so a degree in geometry is needed to work out your flash bounce angle.
Large flower displays are often placed directly in your line of site at the alter/front.

I am sure you will add your favourites to the list but wouldn't you think that these venues would at least consult a photographer as the images are probably the best source of marketing to secure more bookings.

Have I got a point here or have I become a photographic deva (or whatever the male version is)

Last Modified By monkeygrip at 16 Sep 2012 - 1:19 PM
Sponsored Links
Sponsored Links 
16 Sep 2012 - 1:18 PM

Join ePHOTOzine for free and remove these adverts.

Carabosse
Carabosse e2 Member 1139367 forum postsCarabosse vcard England269 Constructive Critique Points
16 Sep 2012 - 1:27 PM

It wouldn't be a bad idea for EPZ to have a comprehensive, up to date and consolidated technique/advice article for wedding photography. I know there is stuff dotted about.

Then we can answer all questions by just giving the link! Wink

monkeygrip
16 Sep 2012 - 1:39 PM

I guess that's my point CB how can we offer advice on wedding photography when every venue has its own unique challenges.

I might add that sometimes a research visit to prepare for the venue is sometimes no help at all because the couple or the venue often will decide to change the layout.

I only have 4 years of experience shooting weddings and I have to admit there have been situations that have tested my skills to the absolute limits extreme training but terryfying at the time.

pulsar69
pulsar69  91611 forum posts United Kingdom6 Constructive Critique Points
16 Sep 2012 - 2:57 PM

I completely agree with your comments on the venues, however it is really the b&gs day and they arrange it how they see it and then its up to us photographers to overcome all the difficulties and try and reproduce the b&gs vision in print , its that challenge in itself that I love and I think if everyone made everything perfect the job would be far to easy and all sorts of people would be doing weddings Wink

monkeygrip
16 Sep 2012 - 3:28 PM

You are right Andrew, I must admit I love the challenges and the ability to think fast and get the job done right is why so many people won't even try to shoot a wedding.

It's just frustrating when you spot the perfect shot and a crappy plastic tree with LED lights on it is in the way lol.

I had an embarrassing moment yesterday when adjusting my flash as the bride arrived at the front of the ceremony and my diffuser decided to pop off and bounce under the brides dress. We all laughed and just got on with it, that kind of thing could crush a less confident photographer.

scottishphototours

I've worked with a couple of local venues and the results were quite interesting:

- pointing out the pitfalls of placing that hideous framed print of two horses behind the top table, behind the B&G's heads
- mounting that 12 foot by 8 foot framed mirror somewhere else, other than behind the top table...
- switching off the multicoloured light curtain behind the Registrar so the vows pics don't look like they're taken in a disco
- disguising that CCTV column that the hotel got installed right behind the area they'd specifically set aside for the group pictures
- installing blinds to disguise the industrial coffee machine sitting right at the window of the beautiful hotel facade
- moving the fire extinguisher point, at the base of the art-deco staircase, which every Bride wants pictured at...

Churches have been fun too:

- Actually asking the Priest to turn the couple during the vows so that everyone in the Church can see them
- Moving the notice board that ALWAYS appears behind the Bride as she walks down the aisle with Dad
- Removing the piece of dayglow paper asking people to pay for candles that's taped to the wall - and appears right behind the couple during their vows...

I think it's safe to say that most places don't have a clue when it comes to photography, but also that most don't actually CARE either...

monkeygrip
16 Sep 2012 - 4:49 PM

Andy I have made similar comments to venues and their response is often "Oh your not the first photographer to mention that" and yet they do nothing.

User_Removed
16 Sep 2012 - 4:56 PM

Let's just face fact.

As far as "the big day" is concerned, photography comes very far down the list of priorities.

Venue, Ceremony, minister, guests, meal, drinks, band, speeches, etc., etc, are all infinitely more important to the principal participants than a side-issue like photography.

From some of the posts that we see here on this forum, you'd think the photographer had a very inflated notion of self-importance.

Think back to your own weddings, guys. You couldn't have given a flying f*** about the photography as long as the champagne didn't run out, the band didn't stop playing and your guests enjoyed themselves.

I am sure that I am like 99.9999999% of people in that I have never once looked at the photographs of my own wedding in the 44 years since we got back from our honeymoon. Yet I suspect that my late father-in-law probably paid the equivalent of a week's salary for them.

.

Last Modified By User_Removed at 16 Sep 2012 - 4:59 PM
monkeygrip
16 Sep 2012 - 5:13 PM

Ah yes the good old fashioned groom opinion, personally I agree.

Very often you are hired by the bride and in today's digital world where they can't wait to show off to the world on Facebook their wonderful wedding day your images are tomorrows adverts.

The days of the album in the loft are overWink

pulsar69
pulsar69  91611 forum posts United Kingdom6 Constructive Critique Points
16 Sep 2012 - 6:01 PM


Quote: Let's just face fact.

As far as "the big day" is concerned, photography comes very far down the list of priorities.

Venue, Ceremony, minister, guests, meal, drinks, band, speeches, etc., etc, are all infinitely more important to the principal participants than a side-issue like photography.

From some of the posts that we see here on this forum, you'd think the photographer had a very inflated notion of self-importance.

Think back to your own weddings, guys. You couldn't have given a flying f*** about the photography as long as the champagne didn't run out, the band didn't stop playing and your guests enjoyed themselves.

I am sure that I am like 99.9999999% of people in that I have never once looked at the photographs of my own wedding in the 44 years since we got back from our honeymoon. Yet I suspect that my late father-in-law probably paid the equivalent of a week's salary for them.

.

Way Way Way off the mark and certainly far from fact, todays b&g unlike those of 40 years ago ( if your model is correct ) are VERY interested in their photography and spend many hours choosing the photographer looking at photo styles and many many more hours after the wedding showing off the album , posting photos on the internet and really getting into the spirit. Admittedly they love photography but dont necessarily understand it all so couldnt possibly put right all those little niggles we deal with as they dont even realise they are there. So there is an element of truth to the fact that during the event the B&G will not be focussed on the photography - why should they be thats our job.

That therefore becomes part of our role in the day , to make things look good and use our experience to bend peoples rules and venues pre conceived ideas of what is right in a professional manner that will leave the B&G with breathtaking photos to treasure.

pulsar69
pulsar69  91611 forum posts United Kingdom6 Constructive Critique Points
16 Sep 2012 - 6:02 PM

Or in Lucians case - to run in , burn some photos to a memory stick , and do one .......

Graysta
Graysta  91118 forum posts England
16 Sep 2012 - 6:40 PM

A few points
3.30pm in February
Adverts/ posters for the venue in key area's
Fire exits/ect
organisers that think it's fun to send everone to the bar as you want the groups, then they all take ages to get back.
Beer, once this is applied the whole thing can turn to s--t
Grass. they pick an ideal location with nice grass & woodland no way does that Bride want to do that in high heels & wedding dress.
On the plus side just done a wedding for a farmers daughter marrying a farm manager we had Tractor as wedding car. wellies on bride use of private fishing pond and all the family pet's sunshine & smiles all the way How bloody easy is that
50 side album.from 2000+shots on the day all up for it. I enjoyed doing it so much I nearly gave them a discount

janeez
janeez e2 Member 51147 forum postsjaneez vcard United Kingdom8 Constructive Critique Points
16 Sep 2012 - 7:19 PM

a real pain in the A*** for me is where they place the wedding cake! In such awkward, dark, obscure little corners of a room on a stupid little table with no thought as to how the B&G will get to cut the cake let alone how the photographer is meant to get anything other than the backs of the B&G!

On the other hand. we are shooting a wedding next year with the B&G taking all the guests on a wellie walk before the wedding breakfast. Smile

KarenFB
KarenFB Junior Gallery Team 74167 forum postsKarenFB vcard England159 Constructive Critique Points
16 Sep 2012 - 7:53 PM

My daughter has a real challenge for her photographer next year. First of all we are going on a steam train to a tiny railway station waiting room, then back to the station to go on board a boat for a river cruise reception!! Smile Only 25 guests, so a nice small group. The photographer we've chosen seems quite enthusiastic about it all.

The first photographer she found soon got the 'heave ho!'. A few days after contacting him, he phoned her saying she'd have to make her mind up quickly because another couple wanted to book him for that day. She phoned me in a panic..................I told her to play his bluff. So she did! He phoned her back and asked why she hadn't chosen him, so she said she'd asked family opinion and someone else had been chosen. His parting words were "Well, *sniff*, that's up to you - such a shame though, I've recently done a shoot there and knew all the best angles". Funny how he hadn't mentioned that when she phoned up to book him. Tongue

thewilliam
16 Sep 2012 - 7:57 PM

When I was assisting She-who-must-be-obeyed and doing the cake cutting, the wedding co-ordinator told me off for placing the bride away from the light because that wasn't how it was done at that venue. I just asked her to humour me. It seemed sensible to place the dark suit and skin nearer the light rather than in the gloomy corner.

Add a Comment

You must be a member to leave a comment

Username:
Password:
Remember me:
Un-tick this box if you want to login each time you visit.