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What Printing Ratio should I use?

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    cadley
    cadley  6 England
    20 Aug 2012 - 4:24 PM

    Hi,

    I have just bought a full frame digital SLR but am confused as to what print size is best to opt for so I don't experience any cropping when the mages are printed. Is it a 3:2 ratio or is it something different?

    Another question is if I crop an image in photoshop to anything outside of these ratios will it effect the print? i.e. If I used a 6 inches by 4 inches crop tool would it be different in the final print if I cropped the image say 6 inches by 5 inches (to get rid of something unwanted in the picture to make a portrait picture landscape)?

    Please help as I have got myself so confused!

    Thanks

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    JJGEE
    JJGEE  96106 forum posts England18 Constructive Critique Points
    20 Aug 2012 - 4:57 PM

    I should not worry about any of that.

    Just process the image, which includes cropping, then choose the size of paper large enough on which to print it.
    If your final image does not conform to a set ratio then the print may have a border around it which can be trimmed off if so desired.

    JackAllTog
    JackAllTog e2 Member 53471 forum postsJackAllTog vcard United Kingdom58 Constructive Critique Points
    20 Aug 2012 - 5:01 PM

    Hi Richard,

    The answer depends on the paper you are printing on. If you print on the smaller 6" by 4" traditional size paper sheets then no cropping at all.
    If you print on A4 then there will either be some cropping or a white border top and bottom.
    You will need to print out a few draft prints to get a fee for this.

    What you crop in photoshop will be on the print, but as above there may be white bands where it does not fit the paper exactly.

    Many people trim their prints after printing to remove the unprinted white area, or some make it into a feature with a white border all around the picture.

    try a few out in draft mode to save the ink.

    User_Removed
    20 Aug 2012 - 5:37 PM

    I stick to multiples of 3:2 as it suits my camera's native aspect ratio. I sometimes crop to fit certain frames. This is a good read about the subject

    Nick_w
    Nick_w e2 Member 63723 forum postsNick_w vcard England98 Constructive Critique Points
    20 Aug 2012 - 6:21 PM

    Why constrain yourself to predefined aspect ratios? Crop for the image and not the frame. Then use mounts with bespoke apertures to fit in the frames.

    RoyBoy
    RoyBoy  9148 forum posts United Kingdom2 Constructive Critique Points
    20 Aug 2012 - 8:03 PM

    I agree with all above.

    However one thing to consider is the size of the final print and how it is going to be mounted. The standard mount size for most camera club and national competitions is 50cm x 40cm. This is great because it also happens to be one of the standard sizes for ready made frames.

    Whether in portrait or landscape orientation, ideally it is best to have the width of the left, right and top borders the same and with that on the base a little bit wider. The deeper base gives the image something to sit on and brings balance to the whole look and feel of the finished article. Just look at professionally mounted images (photographs, paintings, etc) and you will frequently see this.

    If the image is square and you are placing it on a rectangular mount make sure that the mount is in portrait orientation and the image is mounted higher up, again with a much larger width at the bottom.

    Having said all that, it is the image which is important and sometimes loosing a part of an image to achieve such proportions is just not worth it.

    I hope this helps

    bigalguitarpicker


    Quote:

    Whether in portrait or landscape orientation, ideally it is best to have the width of the left, right and top borders the same and with that on the base a little bit wider. The deeper base gives the image something to sit on and brings balance to the whole look and feel of the finished article. Just look at professionally mounted images (photographs, paintings, etc) and you will frequently see this.



    I asked about this recently in the framing shop where I get my window mounts cut. The framer will happily cut any size and shape of mount required, but he told me that the broader depth at the bottom is falling out of favour. I thought the "broader at the bottom" presentation looked good (still do) when using 50cmx40cm mounts for my A4 prints, but if I'm mounting A4 in 30cmx40cm mounts, then equal spacing seems to work better.
    Alex.

    cadley
    cadley  6 England
    21 Aug 2012 - 9:36 AM

    Thanks for all of the above.

    Now what would happen if say I was taking them to the printers to be delivered at one of their standard sizes? would do you recommend I do then?

    Thanks

    User_Removed
    21 Aug 2012 - 2:52 PM


    Quote: Why constrain yourself to predefined aspect ratios? Crop for the image and not the frame. Then use mounts with bespoke apertures to fit in the frames.

    Definitely.

    Cropping is an essential part of the whole composition process. Some subjects suit 5:4, some 5:3, some 4:1, some square and many in-between.

    Probably the most useful "accessory" I own is my Logan mat-cutter which allows me to cut bevel-aperture mounts to suit any aspect ratio of print.


    .

    Last Modified By User_Removed at 21 Aug 2012 - 2:52 PM
    JJGEE
    JJGEE  96106 forum posts England18 Constructive Critique Points
    21 Aug 2012 - 3:21 PM


    Quote: Now what would happen if say I was taking them to the printers to be delivered at one of their standard sizes? would do you recommend I do then?

    Choose another printer Wink

    Focus_Man
    Focus_Man  4481 forum posts United Kingdom631 Constructive Critique Points
    24 Sep 2012 - 9:39 AM

    if you want 6" x 4" prints, then teh files you offer should all be cropped to that ratio ie 3:2 = 1:1.5. better still just use your software crop tool to make 6" x 4" files.

    If you want 7" x 5" prints then crop to that size, all very simple.

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