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Which is better ? A CCD sensor or a backlit cmos sensor


steve_i e2
3 545 United Kingdom
2 Dec 2013 3:50PM
I'm still looking at buying a new bridge camera but now I have a new problem thrown into the decision which sensor is better ccd or backlit cmos?After googling it just confused me even more Tongue so any advise would really be helpful
thanks Steve

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joshwa e2
4 710 United Kingdom
2 Dec 2013 5:52PM
This explains the differences in CCD vs backlit CMOS:
http://www.ephotozine.com/article/buyers-guide-to-digital-camera-sensor-technology-16808

In addition, backlit CMOS in compact / bridge cameras gives fullHD video, quick continuous shooting etc
Dann
1 223
2 Dec 2013 7:03PM
CCD..?? Old technology - and very firmly surpassed by anything offered from the 'CMOS' stable.

Until something new comes along... Wink
2 Dec 2013 7:38PM
Some entertaining Wink reading:
CCD V CMOS
as far as cameras are concerned, I get the impression that nowadays those with CCDs tend to be at the lower end of the manufacturers' ranges.
ChiliMan e2
8 135 17 Singapore
2 Dec 2013 11:51PM
Thanks for the links and info, Josh and Pete.

Andrew
3 Dec 2013 8:58AM

Quote:
In addition, backlit CMOS in compact / bridge cameras gives fullHD video, quick continuous shooting etc



Are you saying that CCD doesn't offer this? Some of the best video cameras made are CCD - my Panasonic HD is a CCD based camera and its video (and stills) are excellent.

When digital cameras were in their infancy almost all of them had CCDs because they gave greater sensitivity - partly because their whole surface area collects light, unlike CMOS. The trouble was that they were very expensive to make for larger sensor cameras. So some manufacturers started using CMOS for the DSLRs where sensitivity was less important - but CCDs were still retained for the compact cameras because CMOS wasn't good enough at high ISO.

Over the years so much development has been put into overcoming the CMOS deficiencies that it's now comparable to CCDs and it has some advantages - like the ability to put on-chip electronics such as a convertor/amplifier for each pixel. I still reckon that the CCDs had a "pop" that CMOS doesn't seem to have - look at a Nikon D100 or Sony A100, which still take brilliant pictures.
joshwa e2
4 710 United Kingdom
3 Dec 2013 9:35AM
Hi Steppenwolf, no sorry, my comments were just relating to compact cameras in general, and not camcorders etc. Cheers Smile
3 Dec 2013 11:15AM
Some of the Olympus owners used to say how much nicer the IQ and colours were from the old Kodak CCD sensors In early Olympus DSLR's. Compared to CMOS sensors, CCD did have limited performance because of noise at any thing much above 400 ISO.
Agreed about the Sony A100, Minolta 5D as well, superb pictures.
ChrisV e2
8 889 26 United Kingdom
3 Dec 2013 11:40AM
Unless I'm much mistaken most medium format sensors still use CCDs - they're supposed to offer finer tonality [I'm not sure that necessarily equals broader dynamic range] and richer colour fidelity. There was a comparison done I recall between the D800 and a similar resolution MF sensor. The studio guy who used both said they still preferred the MF at lower ISOs. Once ISO went over fairly modest levels by today's standards, [it was only ISO 400 or 800 AFAIR] the CCD output lost out big style. Of course you'd usually use MF in a studio environment anyway where you're controlling your own light, but out in the field the D800 would be king for all sorts of reasons.

What's this got to do with the sensors in bridge cameras? Not a lot.
keithh e2
11 23.4k 33 Wallis And Futuna
3 Dec 2013 11:49AM
CCD sensors are used in high end digital backs and cameras for one reason.....what comes out the other end.
steve_i e2
3 545 United Kingdom
3 Dec 2013 12:13PM
Ok I've been looking at the Pentex x5 and the cannon sx500 (amongst others) one has the backlit cmos and the other has CCD and I just don't know which is better even after reading all the information lol think I must be having a thick day Smile
3 Dec 2013 10:34PM
Hi, I remember reading on the site the review for the Pentax x5 I am quite confident that they would have reviewed the Canon sx500. In case they have different sensors, what I would do is to print two of the sample pictures one from each, from the same printer and compared how they look. You can view the testing images and compare them if you want too. That is what it matters. The picture is not just the work of the sensor but of the quality of the glass in front of it. Check which one has more aspect options, so you don't hassle with the shape of the frame on the pc when you are home. Go for the one that gives you more options: 1:1, 3:2, 4:3, etc. Comprende?
steve_i e2
3 545 United Kingdom
4 Dec 2013 9:55AM
I just think I will have to go look and play lol
4 Dec 2013 1:18PM

Quote:I just think I will have to go look and play lol


That's probably the best idea. If there are any differences between the two cameras due to the sensor technology then it'll probably be that the Canon is slightly less good at high ISO (probably about a stop or so) but it might make up for this in other ways. It's difficult to judge which is better really because there are just so many ways you can adjust the output of modern digital cameras that it takes weeks to work out how to get the best out of any camera.
steve_i e2
3 545 United Kingdom
4 Dec 2013 4:11PM

Quote:I just think I will have to go look and play lol

That's probably the best idea. If there are any differences between the two cameras due to the sensor technology then it'll probably be that the Canon is slightly less good at high ISO (probably about a stop or so) but it might make up for this in other ways. It's difficult to judge which is better really because there are just so many ways you can adjust the output of modern digital cameras that it takes weeks to work out how to get the best out of any camera.


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