Take your photography to the next level and beyond...

  • NEWS
  • REVIEWS
  • INSPIRATION
  • COMMUNITY
  • COMPETITIONS

Why not join for free today?

Join for Free

Your total photography experience starts here


Who will inherit your photos?


cats_123 e2
10 4.3k 25 Northern Ireland
8 Jan 2013 10:52AM
Trying not to be too dark and depressing, but the recent sad departure of epz members and with some who are suffering ill-health...just begged the questions...

Have you thought about what will happen to your `collection' after you've gone?
Will it be condemned to being cleansed from the hard drive or have you made arrangements in `the cloud' so that your treasured images will live for eternity? SmileSmile
Will you donate them to a museum of photography...does such a scheme exist?


that's the trouble with getting old.....SadSad

Join ePHOTOzine for free and remove these adverts.

Pete e2
13 18.7k 96 England
8 Jan 2013 10:59AM
It's an interesting thought. Look on ebay and you will see collections of transparencies being sold as job lots by those who have inherited and being bought by people hoping to find hidden treasures.

I've been digitally archiving all my old memorabilia (old concert ticket stubs, fliers and autographs)...and then either throwing away or selling the physical copy. I plan to scan my best transparencies in at some point, but have been putting off that task as it will take many hundreds of evenings.
8 Jan 2013 11:04AM
A visiting speaker to my club mentioned this issue and suggested that the pile of prints which take up space would be the first thing your relatives will throw out. Out will go all those old negatives/slides and what will happen to your computer. Assuming it is not also dumped, it will probably be re-formatted for re-use. Even if you have cloud storage who will have your password so the images may eventually be erased after no one has accessed them for years. All very depressing but it still sounded realistic. He then produced an rather splendid hard back book of his best images along with some background text which he produced using Lightroom 4 and Blurb. He suggested that no one would throw out a really nice coffee table book full of good photographs and I think he is right. It is on my To Do list but not yet high priority.

Dave
Pete e2
13 18.7k 96 England
8 Jan 2013 11:11AM

Quote:He suggested that no one would throw out a really nice coffee table book full of good photographs and I think he is right.

That's a really good idea - it may get taken to a charity shop but at least it will live on. It also makes you selective. What is really worth keeping? I was going through an albums of transparencies the other night. I'd looked through a few years ago and thrown away the non keepers that I'd once thought were keepers. I managed to get rid of another bunch. I'm sure if I go back in another few years I can do the same. If I went through with the intention of printing them in a book there would be few I'd want in. So maybe I should throw all the others away now and save me a job (or someone else) in the future Wink
cats_123 e2
10 4.3k 25 Northern Ireland
8 Jan 2013 11:18AM

Quote:A visiting speaker to my club mentioned this issue and suggested that the pile of prints which take up space would be the first thing your relatives will throw out. Out will go all those old negatives/slides and what will happen to your computer. Assuming it is not also dumped, it will probably be re-formatted for re-use. Even if you have cloud storage who will have your password so the images may eventually be erased after no one has accessed them for years. All very depressing but it still sounded realistic. He then produced an rather splendid hard back book of his best images along with some background text which he produced using Lightroom 4 and Blurb. He suggested that no one would throw out a really nice coffee table book full of good photographs and I think he is right. It is on my To Do list but not yet high priority.

Dave



Over the past two/three years we have produced `coffee table' style books from all our holidays...they're much easier to bore people with than a load of prints or a slide show GrinGrin

Hopefully they will live on...I probably ought to sign and date them for posterity Smile
cats_123 e2
10 4.3k 25 Northern Ireland
8 Jan 2013 11:19AM

Quote:He suggested that no one would throw out a really nice coffee table book full of good photographs and I think he is right.
That's a really good idea - it may get taken to a charity shop but at least it will live on. It also makes you selective. What is really worth keeping? I was going through an albums of transparencies the other night. I'd looked through a few years ago and thrown away the non keepers that I'd once thought were keepers. I managed to get rid of another bunch. I'm sure if I go back in another few years I can do the same. If I went through with the intention of printing them in a book there would be few I'd want in. So maybe I should throw all the others away now and save me a job (or someone else) in the future Wink



Why not produce a `year' book...or a `decade' book of your `best' images SmileSmile
JohnParminter
7 1.3k 14 England
8 Jan 2013 11:25AM

Quote:Have you thought about what will happen to your `collection' after you've gone?


Indeed, I'm producing and publishing a high quality photographic book of my best images of my favoured subject which I hope should out-live me.

Smile
keith selmes
11 7.1k 1 United Kingdom
8 Jan 2013 11:32AM
No-one in their right mind would want all my files and trannies and negs, and most would probably have no idea what to do with negatives or raw files.
They would probably have no idea how to sort through it, and no time or inclination.

But, if I selected out about 20% on whatever is the current favourite storage medium, including a readily usable format, jpg at the moment, I think surviving friends and family would find that a treasure trove and would enjoy browsing. They would not agree on what they liked but they would all find something to please them. They might find it a valuable inheritance as well, as some material gains value with age. Equally, if they still thought they had too much garbage, they could each have their own set, and delete what they regarded as junk.

There aren't a huge number of prints, as I've culled already, I think they would probably whizz through picking what they wanted and junk the rest. But I do have a lot of negs and trannies to scan, something which I both dread as a boring task, and look forward to, as I really want to dig out old stuff and get it on the computer where it's more accessible.

The ongoing issues I can think of would be how to handle copyright and whether anyone would have the ability to copy on for their future digital media.
As we have a young photographer in the family, I think at least someone would.

I didn't really get started in photography until about 1999, so it isn't as though I have 40 or 50 years worth, not yet anyway, but obviously as above I have been giving it some thought already.
JJGEE
9 6.4k 18 England
8 Jan 2013 11:33AM

Quote:Have you thought about.....

No


Quote:I plan to scan my best transparencies in at some point, but have been putting off that task as it will take many hundreds of evenings.


Ah, just like me then ..... all my transparencies are my BEST ones Wink
Carabosse e2
11 39.7k 269 England
8 Jan 2013 11:39AM
Having myself inherited photos - prints in albums - I've got a pretty good idea of what will happen to mine.

A high proportion of my prints will be binned, and a similar proportion of my digital files deleted! Grin

From my own observation, the inherited photos people keep are mainly of those they know, i.e. family and friends.
Pete e2
13 18.7k 96 England
8 Jan 2013 11:47AM

Quote:From my own observation, the inherited photos people keep are mainly of those they know, i.e. family and friends.

Very true. I have an old case full of old photos saved from my parents when my dad died. Inside are photos of their memories saved by my mum. They mean nothing to me, but I felt obliged to hold on to them (and would certainly keep hold of all the photos of people I recognise), but there are photos of friends (possibly even relatives) that no one in my family can now identify. I'm now in a mindset that my children who never knew either of my parents will not want any of them. So maybe I should save them the job of discarding them later.

What does have value (as a keeper) are shots taken of locations/fashions/transport etc as they have historical merit and I'm sure that's what people who're buying sets off eBay are looking for.
SlowSong e2
6 4.8k 29 England
8 Jan 2013 11:48AM
I don't expect anyone will even notice my passing so what happens to my images is of no consequence to me. Once I'm gone I won't care.
keith selmes
11 7.1k 1 United Kingdom
8 Jan 2013 11:57AM
I don't know how it was for most people in the past, but our family seemed to have had not much else but family and friends photos. The earliest are a handful of studio portraits, then there are the more casual P&S snapshots, albeit the baby box or folder type of P&S.
Later there are many more of almost any family occasion, but very few of any other topic. I don't think anything was thrown away, they just didn't do anything else. I have struggled with identifying some of the older pictures, and I expect that is why people sometimes bin them. But I have scanned most, and made a selection available to relatives, with whatever information is available.

I haven't thrown anything away, but to be fair, compared with my own photographic stuff, they don't take up much space.
keith selmes
11 7.1k 1 United Kingdom
8 Jan 2013 12:05PM

Quote:I'm now in a mindset that my children who never knew either of my parents will not want any of them. So maybe I should save them the job of discarding them later.
My nephews seem genuinely interested in pictures of their great grandfather and great great grandfather, which are now over 100 years old. There are only a few though. Of my parents and my own generation there are many more, and perhaps again it comes down to deselecting the less deserving or interesting images, and leaving those people might like. If there is a vast quantity, they might just not bother with them.
Carabosse e2
11 39.7k 269 England
8 Jan 2013 12:13PM
I have a feeling generations to come won't be all that interested in the superb photos of water droplets, blue tits (in or out of focus! Grin), 'milky' waterfalls, over-saturated landscapes, still lifes............ and the rest of the usual EPZ fare. Wink

But photos of nudes might live on.....................

Sign In

You must be a member to leave a comment.

ePHOTOzine, the web's friendliest photography community.

Join For Free

Upload photos, chat with photographers, win prizes and much more.